Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

Modern Mondays


The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

Building upon the Museum’s eight-decade tradition of fostering cinematic innovation and experimentation, Modern Mondays invites artists working in the expanded field of film, video, performance, and sound to present their work in an intimate setting. A platform for both emerging artists and pioneering figures who have changed the way we think about the moving image, this series premieres new projects and rediscovers landmark works. Considering avant-garde narratives from the 21st century, the program also celebrates legacies of influential historical figures in a contemporary context. Each evening presents a unique opportunity for audiences to engage in dialogue with artists, along with curators and other guests.

Organized by the Department of Film and the Department of Media and Performance Art.

An Evening in Honor of Carolee Schneemann
Monday, March 5, 6:30 p.m., Theater 2

In conjunction with the MoMA PS1 retrospective Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting, this screening event and discussion in celebration of the artist’s work features special guests Melissa Ragona, Associate Professor of Contemporary Art and Critical Studies, School of Art, Carnegie Mellon University, on the role of sound in Schneemann’s work; Jenny Jaskey, Director, The Artist’s Institute, on the experimental film Plumb Line (1968–72); artist Amy Sillman, on Schneemann as painter; and Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipoli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, on the Lebanon Series (1981–99). A conversation and Q&A with Schneemann follows.

An Evening with Michael Holman
Monday, March 12, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

 Throughout the 1980s, artist and impresario Michael Holman thrived at the intersection of Manhattan’s No Wave and hip-hop scenes, producing pioneering work across music, performance, and television. In this live appearance, Holman revisits an early performance with his Gray bandmate, Wayne Clifford, in which Super8 and analog video loops were manipulated live, much like a DJ at a turntable, in the spirit of the band’s structural aesthetics. At MoMA, the new iteration of this loop performance, titled The Subjective Gaze, will consist of improvised moving images by Holman and sound by Nick Taylor, also of Gray, as a starting point in an expansive exploration of loops as a motif across scientific, spiritual, and artistic realms, in a hypnotizing study of the inherent structures underlying creativity.

This program accompanies Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983.

An Evening with Morgan Fisher
Monday, March 19, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

Point Counterpoint: Avant-Garde Film Scores, 1955–1973 culminates in a special Modern Mondays evening with the Los Angeles–based artist Morgan Fisher, who presents the North American premiere of his latest work, Another Movie (2017), in dialogue with Bruce Conner’s A MOVIE (1958). In his 50 years of making films, paintings, and installations, Fisher has explored the defining properties of each artistic medium in ways that are conceptually provocative, sensual, and even humorous. Reflecting on the relationship between sound and image, he will introduce his 1973 film Pictures and Sound Rushes as a prelude to considering the use of Ottorino Respighi’s symphonic tone poem Pines of Rome(1924) in Bruce Conner’s classic experimental film A MOVIE and in Fisher’s Another Movie, made some 60 years later. Fisher writes, “Conner turns the music to his purposes by putting images to it that are radically different from the four scenes Respighi said his music describes. Another Movieuses Respighi’s composition in its entirety, and it literalizes the third movement, which Conner omitted. This leaves the rest of Respighi’s music to be haunted by our memory of Conner’s indelible imagery—by turns pathetic, exotic, ridiculous, comical, catastrophic, grotesque, banal, glorious.” 

An Evening of Computer Films with Ken Knowlton
Monday, March 26, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

Ken Knowlton, formerly of the Computer Techniques Research Department at Bell Labs, was one of the critical computer researchers who pioneered computer-animated films. This evening features screenings and a conversation illustrating the history of computer-animated films and Knowlton’s involvement in their development.

This program accompanies Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989.

An Evening with Shannon Plumb
Monday, April 16, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

Shannon Plumb (American, 1970) becomes a literal one-woman show when she stars as all of the characters in her humorous, often caustic short films. She weaves her life as an artist, wife, and mother into these comedic works, morphing the ordinary into the astonishing by channeling the physicality of Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, and Lucille Ball. There is also a charming low-tech aesthetic in Plumb’s work, particularly with her preference for Super 8mm film and handmade costumes and props. But the payoff is sophisticated, shrewd, and wholly original, offering deft commentary on fashion, domesticity, body image, and the curious world of contemporary art.

In 2013 Plumb’s first feature film, Towheads, a self-assured visualization of modern-day motherly responsibility, premiered in MoMA’s New Directors/New Films festival. Plumb again played all of the key roles, defining her fictional characters using wigs, stuck-on mustaches, and the nobility of a woman pushed to the edge by two young sons and a distant husband. Many of these familial themes are persistent in Plumb’s work—a result of her constant intertwining of real life and art making.

Shannon Plumb joins us to screen several of her films—including Rattles and CherriesRollercoaster, and Olympics—and premiere a performance from her new work Chopped Liver.

An Evening with Candy Kugel
Monday, April 23, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

In Candy Kugel’s new film I, Candy (2018), the process of deconstructing a childhood drawing triggers the artist’s reflections on a personal history with anti-Semitism, political activism, and life choices affected by luck and determination. Displaying an encyclopedic range of animation techniques with remarkable dexterity, I, Candy is a testament to Kugel’s pioneering 45-year career in the field. Animation artist and historian John Canemaker joins Kugel to discuss her legacy as a woman artist in the traditionally male business of independent animation in New York.

An Evening with Tamer El Said
Monday, April 30, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
The filmmaker joins us for a discussion of the occasion of MoMA’s weeklong run of his In the Last Days of the City.

MoMA Announces Major Gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

October 17, 2016


The Museum of Modern Art announced that it has received a major gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, which will add more than 100 works of modern art by major artists from Latin America to the Museum’s collection, and establish the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America. The Cisneros Institute will be dedicated to an expansive approach to the study and interpretation of modern and contemporary art from Latin America.

The gift includes 102 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, made between the 1940s and the 1990s by 37 artists working in Brazil, Venezuela, and the Río de la Plata region of Argentina and Uruguay, including Lygia Clark, Hélio Oiticica, Lygia Pape, Jesús Rafael Soto, Alejandro Otero, and Tomás Maldonado. They join 40 works previously given by Patricia and Gustavo Cisneros over the last 16 years; Mrs. Cisneros is a longtime MoMA Trustee and a member of several acquisitions and funding committees, including the Latin American and Caribbean Fund, of which she is chairman and founder.

The Cisneros Institute, to be located on MoMA’s Midtown Manhattan campus, will offer opportunities for curatorial research and travel, host visiting scholars and artists, convene an annual international conference, and produce research publications on art from Latin America. It is poised to become the preeminent research center in the field, building on MoMA’s history of collecting, exhibiting, and studying the art and artists of the region, dating back to 1931. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works by artists from Latin America.

The breadth of this gift is unprecedented, and the accompanying research initiative devoted to the study of the works and their integration into the overall narrative of modern art will greatly enrich MoMA’s collection and scholarly activities. As an integral program of The Museum of Modern Art, the Cisneros Institute represents a singular commitment to the region, and will foster intensive research on and engagement with the region’s art and artists.

For more information and a full list of works, please visit:


Constantin Brancusi Sculpture

July 22, 2018-February 2019

Floor Two, Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Poet Erza Pound spoke of artist Constantin Brancusi’s work as providing “the master keys to the world of form.” Over a career that spanned half a century, his innovations transformed sculpture as it had been known, and influenced generations of artists to come. After moving to Paris in 1904 from his native Romania, Brancusi affected the appearance of Romanian peasant—a long beard, work shirt and sandals—while embedding himself in avant-garde art circles. He soon began pushing modernist sculpture to the threshold of abstraction, developing a new, simplified vocabulary—graceful crescents, gleaming ovoids, and rough-hewn blocks—that often evoked rather than resembled the things named in their titles, such as Bird in Space and Fish. He placed the natural properties of his materials on display, carving directly into wood and stone, polishing metal to high reflectivity. The bases for his sculptures were often built of stacked elements—wood cubes, cylindrical slices, pyramidal blocks or cruciform stones—becoming an integral component of the work itself and hinting at the possibility of infinite rearrangement, an idea that would prove fertile for future decades.

Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, this concise presentation of Brancusi’s career features 11 of the artist’s sculptures, a selection of drawings and photographs, and a rich collection of archival material chronicling the artist’s production and his relationships with his sitters, patrons, and The Museum of Modern Art.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture


Young Architects Program 2018: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine

June-September 2018


Hide & Seek by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of ARUP, has been named the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program. Opening in June 2018, this year’s construction is a responsive, kinetic environment that features nine intersecting elements arrayed across the entirety of the MoMA PS1 courtyard. Drawn from among five finalists, Hide & Seek will serve as a temporary urban landscape for the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series, and remain on view through the summer.

Inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city, Hide & Seek enables surprising connections throughout the adjoining courtyards of MoMA PS1 and the surrounding streets. Each of the horizontal structures contains two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors suspended from a frame. The mirrors move in the wind or with human touch, permitting dislocating views and unique spatial relationships across the space that foster unexpected interactions. As the vanishing points disappear into the depths of the mirrors, the illusion of space expands beyond the physical boundaries of the Museum and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside. In reference to these unpredictable gestures, the upper registers of the steel structure will be filled with a cloud of mist and light, responding to the activity and life of Warm Up at night. Scriptive elements, including a runway and a large-scale hammock, invite visitors into performance and establish platforms for improvisation.

Bloomberg Philanthropies has supported the Young Architects Program since 2007. In 2016, MoMA PS1 and The Museum of Modern Art were thrilled to announce that this lead sponsorship had been extended for three years, enabling the Young Architects Program to thrive and excite audiences through summer 2018.

MoMA PS1 Building Images



Images of MoMA PS1’s building are located through Press Access.


Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures

February 1–15 and August 9–23, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art announces Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures, a two-part series organized by MoMA in association with The Film Foundation and Paramount Pictures. The 30-film program begins on February 1 at 7:00 p.m. with Alfred Santell’s seldom-seen masterwork That Brennan Girl (1946), and continues through February 15; part two of the series will begin August 9 and run through August 23. Curated by Scorsese, the program celebrates a new beginning for the Republic library, which is currently being restored and returned to wide distribution by Paramount. 

“From the ’30s through the ’50s, the different studio logos at the head of every picture carried their own associations and expectations,” said Martin Scorsese. “And for me, the name Republic over the eagle on the mountain peak meant something special. Republic Pictures was what was known as a ‘poverty row’ studio, but what their pictures lacked in resources and prestige they made up for in inventiveness, surprise, and, in certain cases, true innovation. Among the many ‘B’ pictures produced at Republic in the studio’s heyday, there are so many titles that have been overlooked or forgotten; waiting for decades to be seen again. I’m truly excited that MoMA will be presenting 30 of these films, some in newly restored versions courtesy of Paramount Pictures and The Film Foundation. For two weeks this February and two weeks in August, you need to go to MoMA. I can promise you that you have some discoveries in store.” 

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.



The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries, Fifth Floor


Fifth floor

The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries feature on the fifth floor roughly span the years 1880 to 1940. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Post-Impressionism, Cubism, the work of Henri Matisse, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, and Surrealism, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. 

Browse selected works on view.


The Museum of Modern Art, designed by Yoshio Taniguchi. Entrance at 53rd Street. Photo © 2011 Timothy Hursley

Touring and Off-Site Exhibitions



Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
February 21–May 22, 2017

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (KNW), Düsseldorf, Germany
March 4–June 11, 2017

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from the Museum of Modern Art
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virgina
March 10–June 18, 2017

Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire
September 30–April 9, 2017

Robert Rauschenberg
Tate Modern, London, England
November 30, 2016–April 9, 2017

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
November 4, 2017–March 25, 2018

Masterworks from MoMA
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
June 8–October 7, 2018

ALL THAT IS SOLID by PATTU (Cem Kozar, Işıl Ünal) Selected project of YAP Istanbul Modern 2014-2015

Young Architects Program International



With its international partnerships, Young Architects Program (YAP) offers selected young designers and architects across the globe the opportunity to create designs that promote diverse uses such as rest, play, and relaxation as well as hosting a series of live events such as shows, music, dance, exhibitions, and performances. In addition architects are encouraged to address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling, to create highly innovative projects that provide shade, seating, and water. To achieve these goals, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are currently partnering with the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI) in Rome, CONSTRUCTO in Chile, and Istanbul Modern in Turkey (on a biennial cycle).

In May 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul announced a new partnership that further expands the international YAP to South Korea. YAP Korea provides opportunities for emerging architects in South Korea to create temporary exterior installations for summer programming at the MMCA.

A dedicated YAP International website,, features the selected proposals and designs from the winner of YAP International. The website also includes an archive of past MoMA/MoMA PS1 YAP finalists and winning proposals, interviews with the curators, and installation videos.


Max Ernst: Beyond Painting

September 23, 2017–January 01, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany. 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went “beyond painting” to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II. Featuring approximately 100 works drawn from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition includes paintings that challenged material and compositional conventions; collages and overpaintings utilizing found printed reproductions; frottages (rubbings); illustrated books and collage novels; sculptures of painted stone and bronze; and prints made using a range of techniques. Several major, multipart projects represent key moments in Ernst’s long career, ranging from early Dada and Surrealist portfolios of the late 1910s and 1920s to his late masterpiece—a recent acquisition to MoMA’s collection—65 Maximiliana, ou l’exercice illégale de l’astronomie (1964). This illustrated book comprises 34 aquatints complemented by imaginative typographic designs and a secret hieroglyphic script of the artist’s own invention.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Talia Kwartler, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.