Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Ian Cheng

Ian Cheng: EMISSARIES

April 9–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. museum solo exhibition for Ian Cheng, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015–17), a series of live simulation works created using a video game engine. Described by the artist as “a video game that plays itself,” the works are comprised of computer-generated simulations like those used in predictive technologies for complex scenarios such as climate change or elections. Populated by a cast of characters and wildlife that interact, intervene, and recombine in open-ended narratives, Cheng’s simulations evolve endlessly as self-contained ecosystems. The exhibition EMISSARIES marks the completion of this series of works, which contemplate timeless questions about evolution, the origins of human consciousness, and ways of relating to a chaotic existence. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is on display for the first time at MoMA PS1.

EMISSARIES is presented as a large-scale installation that transforms the gallery into a portal-like environment for Cheng’s simulations to build, generate, regress, and progress.  The 10-foot-tall projections allow each simulation to unfold at life-size, positioning viewers as observers who can follow the lives of specific characters as they interact within the simulated worlds and each other in an ever-changing environment.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms, an exhibition featuring the work of the Slovakian artist and documentary filmmaker. Since 2009, Rafa (b. Žilina, 1979) has employed the methods of cinéma verité to document what he refers to as “new nationalisms” across Central Europe, creating vivid and stirring portraits of the resurgence of extreme right-wing, xenophobic, and neo-fascist groups in the region.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; and Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Past Skin

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

In today’s technological environment, we can style, extend, and broadcast ourselves at will, projecting into digital realms that in turn shape us. The six artists in Past Skin take up science historian and cyber-feminist Donna Haraway’s provocation, “Why should our body end at the skin?,” testing the growing porosity between our bodies and habitats in a contemporary world where virtuality is ubiquitous and surreality is increasingly normalized. As much as we exert influence on our bodies and surroundings, the technologies that enable this influence also influence us. No longer simply “users” of technology, we become players renegotiating the stakes of our world, engineering natural and synthetic environments to fulfill social imperatives and emotional needs. Featuring 20 works across a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, drawing, sound, video, and virtual reality—by artists Cui Jie, Jordan Kasey, Hannah Levy, Abigail Lucien, Jillian Mayer, MSHR, and Madelon Vriesendorp, Past Skin highlights works that merge figures with landscapes to examine the state of the contemporary body in and beyond nature.

Past Skin is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

 

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A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976–2000

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976-2000, a selection of archival materials documenting the vast array of artists who worked and exhibited in the museum’s building over the course of its first 25 years. Surveying a period that spans from the institution’s inaugural 1976 exhibition Rooms to its merger with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000, the exhibition brings together hundreds of objects drawn from the MoMA PS1 Archives, including artist’s proposals, exhibition posters, photographs, correspondence, flyers, postcards, residency applications, and other ephemera.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1; and Jonathan Lill, Leon Levy Foundation Project Manager, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15, 2017–August 13, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, April 11, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Remarks will be livestreamed at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning but still relatively under-recognized achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features nearly 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by more than 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse. The exhibition will also feature many little-known treasures such as collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and recent acquisitions on view for the first time at MoMA by Ruth Asawa, Carol Rama, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

 

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW

April 30, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, and The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW is the first major survey in New York of the artist Louise Lawler (American, b. 1947), spanning the 40-year creative output of one of the most influential artists working in the fields of image production and institutional critique. The exhibition takes its title from one of Lawler’s most iconic works, Why Pictures Now (1982), a black-and-white photograph showing a matchbook propped up in an ashtray. Reminiscent of an advertising photograph or a film noir still, it asks the viewer to consider why the work takes the form of a picture, and why the artist is making pictures now. Lawler came of age as part of the Pictures Generation, a loosely knit, highly independent group of artists named for an influential exhibition, Pictures, organized in 1977 by art historian Douglas Crimp at Artists Space in New York. These artists used photography and appropriation-driven strategies to examine the functions and codes of representation. Lawler’s signature style was established in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when she began taking pictures of other artists’ works displayed in collectors’ homes, museums, storage spaces, and auction houses to question the value, meaning, and use of art. WHY PICTURES NOW is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, with Kelly Sidley, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Generous funding is provided by the Walton Family Foundation, David Dechman and Michel Mercure, Fotene Demoulas and Tom Coté, Tracy and Gary Mezzatesta, Susan and Arthur Fleischer, Patrice and Louis Friedman, Mark Diker, and by Ann and Mel Schaffer. 

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends

May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. View a video of the remarks.

In 1959, Robert Rauschenberg wrote, “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. (I try to act in that gap between the two.)” His work in this gap shaped artistic practice for decades to come.

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Acclaimed artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas is collaborating on the exhibition’s design to foreground Rauschenberg’s work with dance and performance. MoMA’s presentation is structured as an “open monograph”—as other artists came into Rauschenberg’s creative life, they come into the exhibition, mapping the exchange of ideas. These figures include Trisha Brown, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Sari Dienes, Jasper Johns, Billy Klüver, Paul Taylor, David Tudor, Cy Twombly, Susan Weil, and many others.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition design was created in collaboration with the artist Charles Atlas.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Robert Rauschenberg.

The exhibition is supported at Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by Glenn and Eva Dubin, The Dana Foundation, Donald B. Marron, the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund, Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, Mrs. Ronnie F. Heyman, Helen and Charles Schwab, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III in honor of Jerry I. Speyer, and by Tiffany & Co.

Generous funding is provided by west elm.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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Projects 106: Martine Syms

May 27, 2017–July 16, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

Projects 106: Martine Syms, the first US solo museum exhibition by Martine Syms (b. 1988, Los Angeles), is an immersive installation including photographs and staged objects, and centering around a new feature-length film, Incense Sweaters & Ice.

Shot on location in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, Incense Sweaters & Ice follows three protagonists—Mrs. Queen Esther Bernetta White, Girl, and WB (“whiteboy”)—as they navigate dramas of surveillance, moving between watching, being watched, and remaining unseen. Accompanying the film is a suite of photographs sized to standard American movie posters and a metal mesh structure inspired by the geographies of the Great Migration.

Using video and performance, Syms examines representations of blackness and its relationship to narrative, vernacular, feminist thought, and radical traditions. Her artwork has been exhibited and screened extensively, including presentations at the Berlin Biennale, Manifesta 11, ICA London, The Hammer Museum, the New Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Initiated by MoMA in 1971 as a platform for new and experimental art, the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series, now presented at both The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1, provides a forum for the most urgent international voices in contemporary art. Projects 106: Martine Syms will be accompanied by an illustrated brochure. On the occasion of her exhibition, Syms will premiere a new lecture-performance as part of MoMA’s educational programming.

Projects 106: Martine Syms is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to Brent Freaney at Special—Offer.

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A New Golden Age: Contemporary Philippine Cinema

June 01, 2017–June 25, 2017

 

MoMA presents a survey of Philippine cinema from around 2000 to the present, a period known as the Third Golden Age of Philippine cinema (following the first golden age, in the 1950s, and the second, from the 1970s to the early 1980s). The Philippines’ current wave of sustained creativity is unusual in its diversity of genre and style, audacious formal experimentation, and multiplicity of personal/social/political perspectives. Defying simple description, this dizzying array of distinct cinematic statements makes it an exceptionally unique, vibrant movement. From Lav Diaz’s minimalist tales rendered at epic lengths or Brillante Mendoza’s gritty realist portrayals of the margins of society, to Raya Martin’s experimentation with storytelling and form, Ditsi Carolino’s stark documentaries following the disenfranchised, and Erik Matti’s riveting thrillers, contemporary Filipino filmmakers are pushing cinematic boundaries and heating up the global film scene.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Tess Rances and Vicky Belarmino of Cinemalaya, Gil Quito, Huei-Yin Chen, and intern Dalin Liu.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Modern Matinees: Becoming Jennifer Jones

June 01, 2017–June 30, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Phylis Lee Isley was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1919 to parents who operated a traveling tent show. Isley’s education extended to Northwestern University and the American Academy for Dramatic Arts in New York City, where she met actor and future husband Robert Walker in 1939. Before Hollywood called, Isley and Walker returned to Tulsa to find steady work on radio programs. When the couple finally arrived in Hollywood, there was limited work, with stardom years away.

Ready to return to the theater, Isley auditioned at the New York offices of David O. Selznick for an out-of-town run of Rose Franken’s comedy Claudia. Insecure and inexperienced, she left the producer’s office distraught and unaware that Selznick—who had purchased the film rights to the play—had overheard her audition. In short order, he offered Isley a movie contract with his production company.

Ever the genius producer, Selznick took control of Isley’s nascent career, transforming her into “Jennifer Jones.” What Jones needed next was a prominent role in a high profile picture, and The Song of Bernadette (1943) could not have been a more ideal showcase for her metamorphosis. When Jones was cast as the peasant girl who has visions of the Virgin Mary, Selznick kept her away from the press, photographers, and, legend has it, the film’s premiere, in order to retain the illusion of her youth, chastity, and inscrutability. The newly minted Jennifer Jones walked away with that year’s Best Actress Oscar.

King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946) was another defining moment. Cast as a Native American/Caucasian woman who enters the lives of two brothers living on a remote Arizona ranch, Jones was uneasy about her character’s brazen sexuality—as were the censors. Nonetheless, the film went on to great success and earned Jones another of her five Academy Award nominations.

Becoming Jennifer Jones, our glimpse at the evolution of a great American actress, features a selection of films drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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