Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Past Skin

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

In today’s technological environment, we can style, extend, and broadcast ourselves at will, projecting into digital realms that in turn shape us. The six artists in Past Skin take up science historian and cyber-feminist Donna Haraway’s provocation, “Why should our body end at the skin?,” testing the growing porosity between our bodies and habitats in a contemporary world where virtuality is ubiquitous and surreality is increasingly normalized. As much as we exert influence on our bodies and surroundings, the technologies that enable this influence also influence us. No longer simply “users” of technology, we become players renegotiating the stakes of our world, engineering natural and synthetic environments to fulfill social imperatives and emotional needs. Featuring 20 works across a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, drawing, sound, video, and virtual reality—by artists Cui Jie, Jordan Kasey, Hannah Levy, Abigail Lucien, Jillian Mayer, MSHR, and Madelon Vriesendorp, Past Skin highlights works that merge figures with landscapes to examine the state of the contemporary body in and beyond nature.

Past Skin is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

 

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A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976–2000

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976-2000, a selection of archival materials documenting the vast array of artists who worked and exhibited in the museum’s building over the course of its first 25 years. Surveying a period that spans from the institution’s inaugural 1976 exhibition Rooms to its merger with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000, the exhibition brings together hundreds of objects drawn from the MoMA PS1 Archives, including artist’s proposals, exhibition posters, photographs, correspondence, flyers, postcards, residency applications, and other ephemera.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1; and Jonathan Lill, Leon Levy Foundation Project Manager, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, June 8, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow in theater. Watch video of the remarks.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise nearly 400 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, and photographs, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Young Architects Program 2017: Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio

June 29, 2017–September 04, 2017

MoMA PS1

Lumen, an immersive, interactive installation by Jenny Sabin Studio, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard beginning June 29. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s structure evolves over the course of the day, with responsive textiles that display subtle color in sunlight and emit glowing light after sundown. Lumen serves as the setting for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series, incorporating a custom lighting program to complement these vibrant, popular events. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Made of over 1,000,000 yards of digitally knitted and robotically woven fiber, Lumen features two large-scale cellular canopies with 250 hanging tubular structures that create opportunities for visitors to interact with the work. The design incorporates 100 robotically woven recycled spool stools and a misting system that responds to visitors’ proximity to produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s adaptive architecture is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure transforms throughout the day and night, responding to the density of bodies, heat, and sunlight. The result of collaboration across disciplines, Lumen applies insights and theories from biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering—integrating high-performing, formfitting, and adaptive materials into a structure where code, pattern, human interaction, environment, geometry, and matter operate together.

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Landmark 20th Season of Warm Up Begins July 1

July 01, 2017–September 02, 2017

 

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up celebrates its 20th season in 2017, with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music—both local and global—across a range of genres. Warm Up 2017 begins on Saturday, July 1 and runs through Saturday, September 2, featuring a to-be-announced lineup of emerging and established artists as part of an ambitious and wide-ranging program.

Advance tickets are now available for all Warm Up 2017 dates. In celebration of Warm Up’s founding year, MoMA PS1 will offer a special “1998” ticket package providing access to all ten dates for only $98, available for a limited time only. Full ticketing information can be found within the full press release, in the press kit section of this page, or at mo.ma/warmup .

Over its 20 seasons, Warm Up has featured more than 750 artists, including pop artists Solange, Jamie XX, and Grimes, experimental musicians Arca, Black Dice, and Four Tet, and legendary DJs like DJ Premier, Ritchie Hawtin, and Derrick May. One of the longest-running music programs within a museum, Warm Up has a history of supporting seminal artists before they come to prominence and providing a platform for experimentation, unique collaborations, and new material. 

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Stanya Kahn: Stand in the Stream

July 08, 2017–September 04, 2017

MoMA PS1

In Stand in the Stream, Stanya Kahn weaves together deeply personal and emphatically political imagery into a meditation on intimacy, alienation, and resistance. Both a work of mourning and a call to action, the film is also a documentary portrait of four generations of Kahn’s family: her grandmother, her mother, her son, and herself. MoMA PS1’s exhibition is the New York premiere and first museum presentation of this work.

Built from footage Kahn shot primarily over the past six years, Stand in the Stream records the artist in the act of both living and seeing, culminating in her activist mother’s decline into dementia and eventual death in 2015, and in events leading up to and surrounding the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. In a rhythmic flow of images, punctuated by irruptions of protest, solidarity, and violence, Kahn’s film charts the intersection between private and public life in today’s America.

The film’s title refers both to the stream of digital images and to Bertolt Brecht’s play, Man Equals Man, which deals with the ways in which human beings are instrumentalized in the manner of machines. As Kahn connects to random strangers in internet chatrooms while wearing Halloween monster masks, or voyeuristically records anonymous riders on the subway, she plays with distinctions between the intimacy of family and the estrangement of contemporary life.

The film’s sound design includes original compositions by Kahn and by musician/composer Alexia Riner. All footage is shot live or livestream screen-recorded in real time.

This presentation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction

July 17, 2017–August 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction, presented at The Museum of Modern Art from July 17 through August 31, will screen 70 science-fiction films from all over the world—22 countries including the United States, the Soviet Union, China, India, Cameroon, Mexico and beyond—that explore the question: What does it mean to be human? In a departure from other exhibitions of science-fiction cinema, Future Imperfect moves beyond space travel, visions of the distant future, alien invasions and monsters. Instead, all 70 films take place on Earth in the present (or near present), questioning our humanity in all its miraculous, uncanny, and perhaps unknowable aspects.

Since the dawn of cinema, filmmakers as diverse as Kathryn Bigelow, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Kinji Fukasaku, Jean-Luc Godard, Barry Jenkins, Georges Méliès, Michael Snow, Alexander Sokurov, and Steven Spielberg have explored ideas of memory and consciousness; thought, sensation, and desire; self and other; nature and nurture; time and space; and love and death. Their films, lying at the nexus of art, philosophy and science, occupy a twilight zone bounded only by the imagination, where “humanness” remains an enchanting enigma.

Future Imperfect is organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), consists of an evolving cast of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these events were part of “an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” Recitals, which Adkins orchestrated with the Corps through collective improvisation, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as abolitionist John Brown, musician John Coltrane, explorer Matthew Henson, and singer Bessie Smith.

Projects 107 is the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. In addition to a selection of Adkins’s sculptures, performance props and paraphernalia, and documentary videos of recitals, Projects 107 features a series of live performances by the Corps. The performance program brings together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians in the Lone Wolf Recital Corps: Sanford Biggers, Juini Booth, Blanche Bruce, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Dick Griffin, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Cavassa Nickens, Demetrius Oliver, Clifford Owens, Kamau Amu Patton, Marshall Sealy, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, and Kiane Zawadi; and others, including Da’Niro Elle Brown, Zachary Fabri, LaMont Hamilton, Jason Moran, and Kambui Olujimi.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Modern Matinees: Directed by John Cassavetes

September 01, 2017–October 27, 2017

 

The name John Cassavetes is usually at the top of any list of American independent filmmakers. He raised his own production funds and wrote, directed, and often starred in the features he made, alongside a stalwart group of loyal actors. Steadfastly working outside the Hollywood studio system, Cassavetes (1929–1989) endeavored to bring truly authentic narratives to the screen, regularly focusing on stories about marriage, male friendship, family dynamics, and reconciliation. The subject matter was raw, deeply affecting audiences who saw much of their own lives reflected onscreen.

Cassavetes began his career as an actor in the nascent days of television. By the time he began work on his first feature film, Shadows, in 1959, he had already helmed episodes of Alfred Hitchcock PresentsThe Philco-Goodyear Playhouse, and Playhouse 90. This immersion in television production as both a director and actor provided both the money needed to finance his own films and valuable experience working nimbly with a small budget, limited equipment, and a like-minded cast. According to Shadows producer Seymour Cassel, the film was shot so economically that the 16mm camera equipment was borrowed from fellow New York filmmaker Shirley Clarke. While some of Shadows was improvisational, much was fully scripted by the time the film was shot—including scenes filmed right here in The Museum of Modern Art.

Though each film was an uphill battle, Cassavetes persevered while remaining truly independent. His outsider films were commended by critics, embraced by audiences, and even managed to garner major industry awards. Cassavetes was nominated for two Oscars—for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay—and received awards from the Venice Film Festival and the National Society of Film Critics.

John Cassavetes Directs includes 10 feature films and a short, all drawn from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Kelly Reichardt: Powerfully Observant

September 12, 2017–September 25, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Kelly Reichardt is a true American auteur; you know her films when you see them. Her camera focuses on a landscape and remains, still and patient, until the most minor action occurs—and then she holds for a moment more, an audaciously minimalist style that challenges the audience to focus on light, shadow, or the merest sound. Reichardt’s films have always been preoccupied with the ordinary, tricky messes characters cook up in their daily lives, and her characters are conflicted, exhausted, inhabiting unremarkable worlds laden with broken promises. But when they do break out, like the miserable Florida housewife in River of Grass—beware!

From the unconventional buddy movie Old Joy, to the parched, harrowing wagon train journey of Meek’s Cutoff, to the trio of small-town stories in last year’s Certain Women, Reichardt plumbs human memory, survival, self-reliance, and loneliness. Another unconventional buddy movie, Wendy and Lucy, reflects the economic downturn of 2008 through a taciturn, pragmatic woman who packs up her car and her dog to find work in Alaska.

This mid-career retrospective includes the six feature films Reichardt has made since 1994—a seemingly modest filmography for more than 20 years of work. But these intricately produced and fiercely independent are well worth the wait. As Catherine Wheatley wrote of the characters in Certain Women, “They know to keep their counsel, these women: know the importance of restraint, silence, of knowing when to speak and when to act and when to stay still.” These same qualities characterize the graceful, intensely perceptive films of Kelly Reichardt.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film. Thanks to Dan Berger of Oscilloscope Films and Brittany Shaw.

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