Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first comprehensive retrospective of the work of Carolee Schneemann (American, b. 1939) in the United States, bringing together over 300 works spanning her prolific six-decade career. As one of the most groundbreaking artists of the second half of the twentieth century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into the social construction of the female body and the sexual and cultural biases implicit in traditional art historical narratives have had an indelible impact on subsequent generations of artists.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings from the 1950s, charting their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s—which integrated found objects, mechanical elements, and painterly interventions. A central protagonist of New York City’s downtown avant-garde community, Schneemann explored hybrid art forms that culminated in experimental theater events. She was a co-founder of the innovative Judson Dance Theater and the first visual artist to choreograph for the ensemble. During this period, Schneemann began to position her own body in her work with the intent of performing the roles of “both image-maker and image.” Responding to representations of sexuality made predominantly from the perspective of male artists, Schneemann’s provocative pieces foregrounded her body in ways that challenged prevailing attitudes about female sexuality. In parallel, Schneemann’s outrage over the atrocities of the Vietnam War are starkly reflected in several of her works from the mid-1960s.

The exhibition grounds Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of her lifelong commitment to painting and action, tracing the early developments that would lead to her iconic performances and films from the 1960s and 1970s, through to her multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s exploring feminist iconography, intimacy, and personal loss, as well as political disasters, captivity, and the destruction of war.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting is organized by the Museum der Moderne Salzburg. The exhibition is curated by Sabine Breitwieser, Director, Museum der Moderne Salzburg; and consulting curator Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipolli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, New York; and organized at MoMA PS1 by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Major support is provided by Lonti Ebers and The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Cathy Wilkes

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first monographic exhibition of Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. On view from October 22, 2017 through March 11, 2018, the exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016.

Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures, and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Naeem Mohaiemen: There Is No Last Man

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

 

In his films, installations, and essays, Naeem Mohaiemen (b. London, 1969) researches memories of leftist political utopias, and the contemporary legacies of decolonization. Bringing together two distinct works, Naeem Mohaiemen: There Is No Last Man imagines a relationship between two lonely narrators, each trapped at the edge of history.

Tripoli Cancelled (2017), a fiction film loosely inspired by the artist’s father, follows the daily rituals of a man stranded in an abandoned airport. The film follows him through his daily routine of walking, smoking, writing letters to his wife, staging scenes with mannequins in flight attendant uniforms, and reading from the dark British children’s book Watership Down (1972). Mohaiemen shot the film in Ellinikon Airport in Athens, Greece, loosely inspired by his father’s experience of being stuck in this same airport for nine days in 1977 after losing his passport. Designed by architect Eero Saarinen in the 1960s, Ellinikon was abandoned in 2001 and was recently used to house refugees entering Greece, and then proposed as a site for luxury real estate development during European Union negotiations over Greek debt.

Volume Eleven (flaw in the algorithm of cosmopolitanism) (2016) comprises diptychs that investigate six problematic essays by Mohaiemen’s great uncle, the Bengali writer Syed Mujtaba Ali, who mistakenly embraced German military might as an antidote to British colonial rule in India. When the artist began translating Ali’s short stories of the late 1930s, he was dismayed to discover several writings in which Ali expressed a hope that Nazi Germany would defeat Britain and liberate India from colonial rule. Volume Elevenexplores the intellectual underpinnings of this short-lived fascination with German political thought among a wide range of Indian intellectuals of the period.

The exhibition title responds to Francis Fukuyama’s book The End of History and the Last Man (1992), which proposed that Western liberal democracy and capitalism would be the final shared fate of humanity. Mohaiemen’s work suggests that there will be no “last man” or “end of history” in an era marked by the growing prominence of non-Western histories that acknowledge multiple viewpoints and perspectives on the development of modernity. The artist often works through the literature generated in the aftermath of political defeats, bringing the traumas of history into conversation with his own family narratives. Here, two men struggle at the margins of larger events, telling themselves fables and fictions to keep living.

Naeem Mohaiemen: There Is No Last Man is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator.

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Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

October 31, 2017–April 08, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 31, with remarks to follow.

Remarks were livestreamed.

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the public’s imagination around the world. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition examining the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of downtown New York’s seminal alternative space in full. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Club 57 is accompanied by three film series: You Are Now One Of Us: Film at Club 57, co-organized with guest curator and defining Club 57 artist John “Lypsinka” Epperson (October 29, 2017–February 2018); New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive (December 1, 2017–April 2018), and This Is Now: Film and Video After Punk 1978–1985 (March 15, 2018–March 25,2018), presented in spring 2018 in partnership with LUX and British Film Institute.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.

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The Long Run

November 11, 2017–November 04, 2018

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes what follows.  “The Long Run” provides an alternate view: by chronicling the continued experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking, persistent observation, and countless hours in the studio.  Each work in this presentation exemplifies an artist’s distinct evolution.  For some, this results from continually testing the boundaries of a given medium, for others it reflects the pressures of social, economic, and political circumstances.  Often, it is a combination of both.  “The Long Run” includes monographic galleries and rooms that bring together artists broad ranging in background and approach, drawn from MoMA’s collection.  All the artists in this presentation are united by a ceaseless desire to make meaningful work, year after year, across decades.  They include Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Joan Jonas, Ellsworth Kelly, Helen Levitt, Joan Mitchell, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O’Keeffe, Frank Stella, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents the most comprehensive exhibition ever organized of photographer Stephen Shore’s work, on view from November 19, 2017, until May 28, 2018. The exhibition tracks the artist’s work chronologically, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current work with digital platforms. Stephen Shore establishes the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argues for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Born in 1947, Shore spearheaded the New Color Photography movement in the United States in the 1970s, and became a major catalyst in the renewal of documentary photography in the late 1990s, both in the US and Europe, blending the tradition of American photographers such as Walker Evans with influences from various artistic movements, including Pop, Conceptualism, and even Photo-Realism. Shore’s images seem to achieve perfect neutrality, in both subject matter and approach. His approach cannot be reduced to a style but is best summed up with a few principles from which he has seldom deviated: the search for maximum clarity, the absence of retouching and reframing, and respect for natural light. Above all, he exercises discipline, limiting his shots as much as possible—one shot of a subject, and very little editing afterward.

Stephen Shore is organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 
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Winter/Spring 2018 VW Sunday Sessions

January 28, 2018–April 15, 2018

 

The sixth season of MoMA PS1’s VW Sunday Sessions continues on January 28, with twelve more weekly programs that address a range of current social and political issues, explore the life and legacy of alternative spaces, and foster cross-disciplinary collaboration. Encompassing performance, music, dance, conversation, and film, VW Sunday Sessions underscores how live art forms encourage engagement with our contemporary world. Featuring a wide range of artists, curators, collectives, and activist groups, the full schedule of programs follows below.

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Maria Lassnig: New York Films 1970–1980

February 01, 2018–June 18, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the world premiere of a series of experimental films the artist Maria Lassnig made in New York City in the 1970s. This presentation focuses on a selection of newly discovered and restored films that examine ways of looking and seeing bound up in bodily sensation. Newly restored by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in close collaboration with the Austrian Film Museum, these films incorporate animation, sound, and poetic voiceovers that encourage entry into the artist’s internal world. The restoration was carried out in close collaboration with the Austrian Film Museum under the directorships of Alexander Horwath and Michael Loebenstein, who were indispensable to the restoration of these documents that attest to core principles of Lassnig’s thinking and practice across canvas and celluloid.

Maria Lassnig: New York Films 1970–1980 highlights both finished films and film fragments, all produced using 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8, comprised of live-action footage, animated drawings, animated paper cut-outs, and documentary footage of the artist’s studio and her surroundings in New York. These newly surfaced films enrich and complicate our understandings of Lassnig’s approach to figuration and self-portraiture, as well as other key themes that she investigated throughout her career, including the social roles assigned to women, the tension between public engagement and private seclusion, and questions of technological advancement, especially of imaging technologies and shifts in the way images circulate.

To kick off this exhibition, a world premiere screening accompanied by a comprehensive presentation detailing the restoration process will take place on January 29 at The Museum of Modern Art as part of the museum’s Modern Mondays series as well as To Save and Project: The 15th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation.

Organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000)

February 03, 2018–March 11, 2018

Floor two, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents a major performance installation by Tania Bruguera (Cuban, born 1968), Untitled (Havana, 2000), for the first time since acquiring it in 2015, from February 3 through March 11, 2018. Initially conceived for the 7th Havana Biennial, the work was first presented in the Cabaña Fortress, a military bunker used as a jail for prisoners of conscience during the Cuban Revolution. The Fortress was used from colonial times through the early years of the Revolution as a site where the counter-revolutionary opposition was submitted to torture and execution by firing squad. Combining milled sugarcane, video footage of Fidel Castro, and live performance presented in near-total darkness, the work suggests the contradictions of life following the Cuban Revolution. The work, which was on view for mere hours before being shut down by the Cuban government in 2000, signifies Bruguera’s complex relationship to authority.

Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000) is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, and performances produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

The exhibition is made possible by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.
 
Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
Special thanks to Air Water & Earth and to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.
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