Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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ALL THAT IS SOLID by PATTU (Cem Kozar, Işıl Ünal) Selected project of YAP Istanbul Modern 2014-2015

Young Architects Program International

Ongoing

 

With its international partnerships, Young Architects Program (YAP) offers selected young designers and architects across the globe the opportunity to create designs that promote diverse uses such as rest, play, and relaxation as well as hosting a series of live events such as shows, music, dance, exhibitions, and performances. In addition architects are encouraged to address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling, to create highly innovative projects that provide shade, seating, and water. To achieve these goals, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are currently partnering with the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI) in Rome, CONSTRUCTO in Chile, and Istanbul Modern in Turkey (on a biennial cycle).

In May 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul announced a new partnership that further expands the international YAP to South Korea. YAP Korea provides opportunities for emerging architects in South Korea to create temporary exterior installations for summer programming at the MMCA.

A dedicated YAP International website, MoMA.org/yap, features the selected proposals and designs from the winner of YAP International. The website also includes an archive of past MoMA/MoMA PS1 YAP finalists and winning proposals, interviews with the curators, and installation videos.

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The Long Run

November 11, 2017–November 04, 2018

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes what follows.  “The Long Run” provides an alternate view: by chronicling the continued experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking, persistent observation, and countless hours in the studio.  Each work in this presentation exemplifies an artist’s distinct evolution.  For some, this results from continually testing the boundaries of a given medium, for others it reflects the pressures of social, economic, and political circumstances.  Often, it is a combination of both.  “The Long Run” includes monographic galleries and rooms that bring together artists broad ranging in background and approach, drawn from MoMA’s collection.  All the artists in this presentation are united by a ceaseless desire to make meaningful work, year after year, across decades.  They include Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Joan Jonas, Ellsworth Kelly, Helen Levitt, Joan Mitchell, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O’Keeffe, Frank Stella, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Being: New Photography 2018

March 18, 2018–August 19, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 13, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art presents Being: New Photography 2018, the latest presentation in MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series. Since its inception in 1985, New Photography has introduced more than 100 artists from around the globe, and it is a key component of the Museum’s contemporary program. Every two years, New Photography presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human. On view from March 18 through August 19, 2018, the exhibition includes over 80 new and recent works by 17 artists from ten countries. While at various stages in their careers, all are presenting their work at the Museum for the first time.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology.

The artists included are:

Sofia Borges (Brazilian, born 1984)
Matthew Connors (American, born 1976)
Sam Contis (American, born 1982)
Shilpa Gupta (Indian, born 1976)
Adelita Husni-Bey (Italian, born 1985)
Yazan Khalili (Palestinian, born Syria, 1981)
Harold Mendez (American, born 1977)
Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopian, born 1974)
Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương (American, born Hong Kong, 1979; American, born 1976)
B. Ingrid Olson (American, born 1987)
Joanna Piotrowska (Polish, born 1985)
Em Rooney (American, born 1983)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya (American, born 1982)
Andrzej Steinbach (German, born Poland, 1983)
Stephanie Syjuco (American, born Philippines, 1974)
Carmen Winant (American, born 1983)

Being: New Photography 2018 is organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund , David Dechman and Michel Mercure, and The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Courtney Finch Taylor and by James G. Niven.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 290 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, this inclusive retrospective, which will be seen in its entirety only at the Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor – the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The exhibition will encompass the wide range of diverse mediums that Piper has explored for over 50 years: drawing, photography, works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sculpture, and sound. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over 10 years, and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist in the 56th Venice Biennale of 2015 and Germany’s Käthe Kollwitz Prize for 2018.
 
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
 
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
 
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and David Platzker, former Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
 

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and Lannan Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Marilyn and Larry Fields, and by Marieluise Hessel Artzt.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People

April 15, 2018–September 10, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 will present the first US solo museum exhibition of artist Fernando Palma Rodríguez (Mexican, b. 1957), on view from April 15 to September 10, 2018. Since the early 1990s, Palma Rodríguez has combined his training as an artist and mechanical engineer to create robotic sculptures that utilize custom software to perform complex, narrative choreographies. His works respond to issues facing indigenous communities in Mexico, addressing human and land rights, including the violent targeting of these communities, and urgent environmental crises. These concerns have particular significance to the district of Milpa Alta, an agricultural region outside of Mexico City where Palma Rodríguez lives and runs Calpulli Tecalco, a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of indigenous culture.

Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Special thanks to Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Oaxaca.

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Julia Phillips: Failure Detection

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Julia Phillips (German and American, b. 1985), featuring six newly commissioned major works alongside existing sculptures, on view from April 15 to September 3, 2018. Primarily working with ceramics, Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures mostly avoid direct figuration, instead proposing various support structures for the body and emphasizing its absence. Impressions of the human form are visible through casts of orifices, handprints, and other corporeal traces. While suggestive of particular functions and purposes that are overtly physical, these works also produce social and psychological resonances. For Phillips, the body is entangled in both the real and abstract spaces of politics, made evident through indications given in her arrangements as well as the works’ titles, which are often directives for specific actions.

Julia Phillips (b. 1985, Hamburg, Germany) lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg.

Julia Phillips: Failure Detection is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Projects 108: Gauri Gill

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the US premiere of photographer Gauri Gill’s (Indian, born 1970) most recent body of work, Acts of Appearance. Working closely with members of an Adivasi community in Jawhar district, Maharashtra, India, Gill created a series of vivid color photographs that foreground the community’s renowned production of papier-mâché objects, including traditional sacred masks. Projects 108: Gauri Gill is on view from April 15 through September 3, 2018, featuring Acts of Appearance alongside work from Gill’s series Notes from the Desert.

While traveling in Maharashtra, Gill heard about the Bahoda festival, a ritual celebration of performance and dance observed by members of the Kokna tribe. Over several nights, members of the community enact well-known Hindu epics intermingled with tribal myths, performed with the aid of papier-mâché masks that depict Hindu gods, local tribal gods and demons, and other characters. After seeing the masks, and reflecting upon the possible distance between these traditions and the everyday realities of the Jawhar community, Gill commissioned community members to create a new set of masks that, instead of depicting gods and deities, would take the form of familiar people and animals or valued objects. Many of the masks incorporate common aspects of human existence such as various life stages, states of health, and emotions (or rasas).

Trained as a painter and applied artist, Gill (b. 1970, Chandigarh, India) received a BFA from the Delhi College of Art, and then turned to photography as her primary medium, earning a second BFA from Parsons School of Design in New York and an MFA from Stanford University. In 2011, Gill received the Grange Prize (now known as the Aimia/AGO Photography prize). Her work has been presented internationally and in India, including at documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, the 7th Moscow Biennale, Prospect 4 in New Orleans, and Kochi Biennale, as well as at institutions including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Yale University Art Gallery; the Art Gallery of Ontario; the School of Arts and Aesthetics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi; and the Whitechapel Gallery, London; among others. She lives in New Delhi.

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

 

Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan brings together a selection of performance works by two Chinese artists of different generations that address the relationship between the body and the land. Since the 1980s, the status of land in China has been undergoing radical transformation, mirroring shifts from collectivism to individualism and from socialism to capitalism. The exhibition juxtaposes videos and photographs of early performance works by Zhang Huan (Chinese, b. 1965) with those of more recent performances by Li Binyuan (Chinese, b. 1985).

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund

April 29, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Two, Collection Galleries

The exhibition, Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund, celebrates Gund’s contributions as a patron of the arts, a collector, and a longtime Trustee of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1. On view from April 29, 2018, through July 22, 2018, the presentation pays tribute to the more than 800 works of art she has funded over the past half century. These gifts have come steadily and reliably during her decades of service as a key member of several departmental acquisition committees and her tenure as the Museum’s President from 1991 to 2002.

A studio visit provides an opportunity for some of the most meaningful encounters, conversations, and exchanges between artists, friends, curators, and collectors. Agnes Gund—or “Aggie,” as she is affectionately known—is one of the most dedicated and steadfast of studio visitors, consistently inspired by the thrill of looking and talking with artists in the presence of their artworks. Gund is committed to supporting a vast range of artists, from celebrated figures she counts among her close friends to emerging talents whose work she champions. “My friendships with artists,” she has said, “as well as a sensitivity to the challenges facing women artists and artists of color, have been formative in shaping my collection, which is deeply personal and deeply autobiographical.” The exhibition will reflect the depth of her collecting by bringing together a broad-ranging group of artworks from the 1950s to today in a non-chronological display that sets visitor favorites, seldom seen works, and recent acquisitions in dialogue with one another. Presenting a selection of 55 works Gund has given to MoMA, the exhibition shows that our collection would not be what it is today without her deeply held convictions and unparalleled generosity.

In celebration of her more than 50 years of involvement with the Museum, MoMA’s Party in the Garden will honor Ms. Gund, on May 31. In 1967, she first joined MoMA’s International Council and served on the Museum’s Board of Trustees from 1976 until 2002. Since 2002, she has served as president emerita and currently sits as chairman of the Board of Directors for MoMA PS1. Ms. Gund’s dedication and generous philanthropy to the arts community also extends beyond the Museum to other organizations such as Studio in a School, the Cleveland Museum of Art, National Young Arts Foundation, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Center for Curatorial Leadership, and the Art for Justice Fund, to name only a few.

Organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture. Special thanks to Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Alice and Tom Tisch, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Franz Wassmer, Karen and Gary Winnick, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Bodys Isek Kingelez: City Dreams

May 26, 2018–January 01, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

“Without a model, you are nowhere. A nation that can’t make models is a nation that doesn’t understand things, a nation that doesn’t live,” said visionary artist Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015). Based in then-Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo), following its independence from Belgium, Kingelez made sculptures of imagined buildings and cities that reflected dreams for his country, his continent, and the world. Kingelez’s “extreme maquettes” offer fantastic, utopian models for a more harmonious society of the future. An optimistic alternative to his own experience of urban life in his home city of Kinshasa, which grew exponentially and organically with urban planning and infrastructure often unable to keep step, his work explores urgent questions around urban growth, economic inequity, how communities and societies function, and the rehabilitative power of architecture—issues that resonate profoundly today.

Kingelez’s vibrant, ambitious sculptures are created from an incredible range of everyday materials and found objects—colored paper, commercial packaging, plastic, soda cans, and bottle caps—all meticulously repurposed and arranged. While he didn’t travel outside of Zaire until 1989, he was highly attuned to world events and deeply concerned with social issues. The Scientific Center of Hospitalisation the SIDA (1991), for example, references the AIDS crisis; Palais d’Hirochima (1991) addresses the condtion of postwar Japan; and U.N. (1995) attests to the organization’s global peacekeeping efforts and the artist’s own sense of civic responsibility. In the complex multi-building cityscape Kimbembele Ihunga (1994), the artist reimagines his agricultural home village complete with a soccer stadium, banks, restaurants, and skyscrapers. In Ville Fantôme (1996), which will be accompanied by a Virtual Reality experience for visitors, the artist has imagined a peaceful city in which doctors and police are not needed.

The first US retrospective of Kingelez’s work, the exhibition spans his full career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. These rarely shown works are a call for us all to imagine, in the artist’s words, a “better, more peaceful world.”

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Exhibition design is produced in collaboration with the artist Carsten Höller.

Special thanks to Jean Pigozzi and CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection.

The exhibition is made possible by Allianz, a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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