Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People

April 15, 2018–September 10, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 will present the first US solo museum exhibition of artist Fernando Palma Rodríguez (Mexican, b. 1957), on view from April 15 to September 10, 2018. Since the early 1990s, Palma Rodríguez has combined his training as an artist and mechanical engineer to create robotic sculptures that utilize custom software to perform complex, narrative choreographies. His works respond to issues facing indigenous communities in Mexico, addressing human and land rights, including the violent targeting of these communities, and urgent environmental crises. These concerns have particular significance to the district of Milpa Alta, an agricultural region outside of Mexico City where Palma Rodríguez lives and runs Calpulli Tecalco, a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of indigenous culture.

Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Special thanks to Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Oaxaca.

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Julia Phillips: Failure Detection

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Julia Phillips (German and American, b. 1985), featuring six newly commissioned major works alongside existing sculptures, on view from April 15 to September 3, 2018. Primarily working with ceramics, Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures mostly avoid direct figuration, instead proposing various support structures for the body and emphasizing its absence. Impressions of the human form are visible through casts of orifices, handprints, and other corporeal traces. While suggestive of particular functions and purposes that are overtly physical, these works also produce social and psychological resonances. For Phillips, the body is entangled in both the real and abstract spaces of politics, made evident through indications given in her arrangements as well as the works’ titles, which are often directives for specific actions.

Julia Phillips (b. 1985, Hamburg, Germany) lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg.

Julia Phillips: Failure Detection is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Projects 108: Gauri Gill

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the US premiere of photographer Gauri Gill’s (Indian, born 1970) most recent body of work, Acts of Appearance. Working closely with members of an Adivasi community in Jawhar district, Maharashtra, India, Gill created a series of vivid color photographs that foreground the community’s renowned production of papier-mâché objects, including traditional sacred masks. Projects 108: Gauri Gill is on view from April 15 through September 3, 2018, featuring Acts of Appearance alongside work from Gill’s series Notes from the Desert.

While traveling in Maharashtra, Gill heard about the Bahoda festival, a ritual celebration of performance and dance observed by members of the Kokna tribe. Over several nights, members of the community enact well-known Hindu epics intermingled with tribal myths, performed with the aid of papier-mâché masks that depict Hindu gods, local tribal gods and demons, and other characters. After seeing the masks, and reflecting upon the possible distance between these traditions and the everyday realities of the Jawhar community, Gill commissioned community members to create a new set of masks that, instead of depicting gods and deities, would take the form of familiar people and animals or valued objects. Many of the masks incorporate common aspects of human existence such as various life stages, states of health, and emotions (or rasas).

Trained as a painter and applied artist, Gill (b. 1970, Chandigarh, India) received a BFA from the Delhi College of Art, and then turned to photography as her primary medium, earning a second BFA from Parsons School of Design in New York and an MFA from Stanford University. In 2011, Gill received the Grange Prize (now known as the Aimia/AGO Photography prize). Her work has been presented internationally and in India, including at documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, the 7th Moscow Biennale, Prospect 4 in New Orleans, and Kochi Biennale, as well as at institutions including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Yale University Art Gallery; the Art Gallery of Ontario; the School of Arts and Aesthetics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi; and the Whitechapel Gallery, London; among others. She lives in New Delhi.

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

 

Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan brings together a selection of performance works by two Chinese artists of different generations that address the relationship between the body and the land. Since the 1980s, the status of land in China has been undergoing radical transformation, mirroring shifts from collectivism to individualism and from socialism to capitalism. The exhibition juxtaposes videos and photographs of early performance works by Zhang Huan (Chinese, b. 1965) with those of more recent performances by Li Binyuan (Chinese, b. 1985).

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Bodys Isek Kingelez: City Dreams

May 26, 2018–January 01, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

“Without a model, you are nowhere. A nation that can’t make models is a nation that doesn’t understand things, a nation that doesn’t live,” said visionary artist Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015). Based in then-Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo), following its independence from Belgium, Kingelez made sculptures of imagined buildings and cities that reflected dreams for his country, his continent, and the world. Kingelez’s “extreme maquettes” offer fantastic, utopian models for a more harmonious society of the future. An optimistic alternative to his own experience of urban life in his home city of Kinshasa, which grew exponentially and organically with urban planning and infrastructure often unable to keep step, his work explores urgent questions around urban growth, economic inequity, how communities and societies function, and the rehabilitative power of architecture—issues that resonate profoundly today.

Kingelez’s vibrant, ambitious sculptures are created from an incredible range of everyday materials and found objects—colored paper, commercial packaging, plastic, soda cans, and bottle caps—all meticulously repurposed and arranged. While he didn’t travel outside of Zaire until 1989, he was highly attuned to world events and deeply concerned with social issues. The Scientific Center of Hospitalisation the SIDA (1991), for example, references the AIDS crisis; Palais d’Hirochima (1991) addresses the condtion of postwar Japan; and U.N. (1995) attests to the organization’s global peacekeeping efforts and the artist’s own sense of civic responsibility. In the complex multi-building cityscape Kimbembele Ihunga (1994), the artist reimagines his agricultural home village complete with a soccer stadium, banks, restaurants, and skyscrapers. In Ville Fantôme (1996), which will be accompanied by a Virtual Reality experience for visitors, the artist has imagined a peaceful city in which doctors and police are not needed.

The first US retrospective of Kingelez’s work, the exhibition spans his full career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. These rarely shown works are a call for us all to imagine, in the artist’s words, a “better, more peaceful world.”

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Exhibition design is produced in collaboration with the artist Carsten Höller.

Special thanks to Jean Pigozzi and CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection.

The exhibition is made possible by Allianz, a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Reza Abdoh

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first major retrospective of pioneering theater director and playwright Reza Abdoh (Iranian-American, 1963–95), who was one of the most compelling figures in American experimental theater when he died of AIDS-related complications in 1995 at only 32 years old. Abdoh’s provocative and challenging work confronted the humanitarian catastrophe of the AIDS epidemic and the culture wars of the Reagan era, investigating a range of urgent social issues that remain equally relevant today, including those surrounding sexual orientation, gender, race, class, and privilege.

Co-organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy for Bidoun. The exhibition is co-produced with the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, where it will be presented from February 2 to April 29, 2019 and organized in collaboration with Krist Gruijthuijsen, Director.

Body Armor

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

The four artists in Body Armor—Maryam Hoseini, Zadie Xa, Delilah Montoya, and Ana Pellicer—present approaches to bodily adornment in contemporary life, placing focus on the garments and objects we wear to signal belonging, confer status, or project strength. Wearable ornaments have distinguished their owners for centuries across global cultures, embellishing appearance, granting access, and enhancing power. These distinctive markers allow individuals to move fluidly through a range of identities, operating as instruments of social influence that participate in a shared cultural language predicated on existing hierarchies and stereotypes.

Body Armor reimagines these adornments, and critiques the traditional, often colonial, contexts in which they are deployed. Pushing the boundaries of how we construe femininity across a range of cultures, geographies, and generations, these four artists trace the various ways these symbols work both in public and private space to define features of our cultural life, sense of self, social rankings, and communities.

Body Armor is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 presents a new series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) created between 2015 and 2017. Depicting magnified details of human skin in high resolution, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Featuring six works, which range in height from twelve to nineteen feet, Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is on view through September 3.

Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

Since the 1970s, Sue Coe (British and American, b. 1951) has worked at the juncture of art and activism to expose injustices and abuses of power. Protesting various forms of exploitation and violence, she tackles issues of sexism, racism, economic inequality, xenophobia, and animal cruelty. On view through September 9, Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance highlights these concerns through a selection of drawings, prints, and large-scale collages, as well as illustrations that Coe produced for newspaper opinion pages.

Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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If Everything Is Sculpture Why Make Sculpture? Artist’s Choice: Peter Fischli

Ongoing from June 11

 

This summer, Snowman, a sculpture composed of an actual snowman encased in a glass-door freezer, by Peter Fischli (Swiss, b. 1952) and his longtime collaborator David Weiss (Swiss, 1946–2012), comes to the Museum’s Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden as part of Fischli’s Artist’s Choice presentation. Here, Fischli borrows a question inscribed on a painting presented outdoors by artist Ben Vautier (French, b. 1935): “If everything is sculpture why make sculpture?” Along with Snowman, nearly 20 objects selected by Fischli offer answers to this question.

Initiated in 1989, the Artist’s Choice series invites contemporary artists to organize exhibitions drawn from MoMA’s collection. Fischli is the 13th artist to participate in the series, and the first to do so in the Sculpture Garden.

Snowman (2016) is an updated version of a 1987 site-specific work by Fischli and Weiss that was commissioned by a German thermic power plant whose energy—in the form of heat, paradoxically—was used to keep the snowman perpetually frozen. Though a snowman is, as Fischli observes, a “sculpture that almost anyone can make” simply by rolling three spheres of snow and setting them atop one another, Fischli and Weiss’s Snowman is dependent on a technically complex apparatus for its year-round subsistence. Over the course of three decades of collaboration, Fischli and Weiss shared an interest in exploring inherent contradictions and the extraordinary potential of everyday objects and situations.

Snowman takes on new associations in the setting of MoMA’s Sculpture Garden and in the company of works that span the last century, by artists from Henri Matisse and Aristide Maillol to Tony Smith and Katharina Fritsch. Together, Snowman and its companions testify to the expansive possibilities for sculpture today, and to the role of museums in nurturing and preserving their collections.

Organized by Peter Fischli and Cara Manes, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Artist’s Choice exhibition series is made possible through The Agnes Gund Artist’s Choice Fund endowed by Iara Lee and George Gund III, Lulie and Gordon Gund, Ann and Graham Gund, and Sarah and Geoffrey Gund.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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