Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Nan Goldin (American, born 1953). C.Z. and Max on the Beach, Truro, Massachusetts. 1976. Silver dye bleach print, printed 2006, 23 1/8 x 15 1/2" (58.7 x 39.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Jon L. Stryker. © 2016 Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin: The Ballad of Sexual Dependency

June 11, 2016–April 16, 2017

Contemporary Galleries, second floor

Beginning in June 2016, The Museum of Modern Art is reinstalling its second-floor contemporary galleries with three large-scale, single-work installations by contemporary artists Teiji Furuhashi, Nan Goldin, and Tony Oursler. Presented in distinct galleries, the featured works on view are Furuhashi’s Lovers (1994), Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004), and Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16). Immersive in their construction and generous in size, the three large-scale galleries provide MoMA’s visitors with a unique opportunity to have deep encounters with these monumental works.

Comprising almost 700 snapshot-like portraits sequenced against an evocative music soundtrack, Nan Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a deeply personal narrative, formed out of the artist’s own experiences around Boston, New York, Berlin, and elsewhere in the late 1970s, 1980s, and beyond. Titled after a song in Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s The Threepenny Opera, Goldin’s Ballad is itself a kind of downtown opera; its protagonists—including the artist herself—are captured in intimate moments of love and loss. They experience ecstasy and pain through sex and drug use; they revel at dance clubs and bond with their children at home; and they suffer from domestic violence and the ravages of AIDS. “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is the diary I let people read,” Goldin wrote. “The diary is my form of control over my life. It allows me to obsessively record every detail. It enables me to remember.” The Ballad developed through multiple improvised live performances, for which Goldin ran through the slides by hand and friends helped prepare the soundtrack—from Maria Callas to The Velvet Underground—for an audience not unlike the subjects of the pictures. The Ballad is presented in its original 35mm format, along with photographs from the Museum’s collection that also appear as images in the slide show. Introducing the installation is a selection of materials from the artist’s archive, including posters and flyers announcing early iterations of The Ballad. Live performances will periodically accompany The Ballad during the course of the Museum’s presentation; performance details will be announced during the course of the exhibition presentation. The installation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1; Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, MoMA; and Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

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Tony Oursler. Imponderable. 2015-16. 5-D multimedia installation (color, sound). 90 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired in part through the generosity of Jill and Peter Kraus. © 2016 Tony Oursler. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Tony Oursler: Imponderable

June 18, 2016–April 16, 2017

Yoshiko and Akio Morita Gallery and Contemporary Galleries, second floor

Beginning in June 2016, The Museum of Modern Art is reinstalling its second-floor contemporary galleries with three large-scale, single-work installations by contemporary artists Teiji Furuhashi, Nan Goldin, and Tony Oursler. Presented in distinct galleries, the featured works on view are Furuhashi’s Lovers (1994), Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004), and Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16). Immersive in their construction and generous in size, the three large-scale galleries provide MoMA’s visitors with a unique opportunity to have deep encounters with these monumental works.

Tony Oursler’s Imponderable offers an alternative depiction of modernism that reveals the intersection of technological advancements and occult phenomena over the last two centuries. Presented in a “5-D” cinematic environment utilizing a contemporary form of Pepper’s ghost—a 19th-century phantasmagoric device—and a range of sensory effects, Imponderable is an immersive feature-length film inspired by Oursler’s own archive of ephemera relating to stage magic, spirit photography, pseudoscience, telekinesis, and other manifestations of the paranormal. Drawing on these objects, Imponderable weaves together a social, spiritual, and empirical history of the virtual image that overlaps with the artist’s own family history. The cast of characters, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Mina “Margery” Crandon, and members of Oursler’s family, is portrayed by an eclectic ensemble of artists, musicians, and performers, including Kim Gordon, Jim Fletcher, Keith Sanborn, and Constance DeJong. Bringing together Oursler’s ongoing interest in mysticism, psychedelia, popular culture, and media history, the work uses macabre humor and theatrical surrealism to reflect on the irrational relationship between belief systems and the authenticity of images. Imponderable is presented in conjunction with selections from Oursler’s archive relating to the film. The exhibition is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, and Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA. 

This exhibition coincides with Tony Oursler: The Imponderable Archive, on view at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, June 25–October 30, 2016.

Imponderable was originally commissioned and produced by the LUMA Foundation for the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, and LUMA Westbau, Zurich, Switzerland, 2015.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Generous funding for Tony Oursler: Imponderable is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

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MoMA PS1_FORTY_089_Pete

FORTY

June 19, 2016–August 28, 2016

MoMA PS1

Organized by P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center founder, Alanna Heiss, FORTY features work by over 40 artists who were key participants in the 1970s alternative art spaces movement and the early years of P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center. In 1976, Alanna Heiss founded P.S.1 as the latest venture in a series of pioneering projects organized through her non-profit organization, the Institute for Art and Urban Resources, which included the Clocktower Gallery in lower Manhattan and other disused spaces across New York City. With both the intellectual and physical room to experiment, nearly 80 artists created work for P.S.1’s inaugural 1976 show, Rooms, which has since become a landmark in the art history of 1970s New York. The artists used classrooms, stairwells, windows, closets, bathrooms, the boiler room, courtyard, and attic—often engaging directly with the existing architecture. Rooms catalyzed changes in the forms and methods of making art, and expanded ideas about how it could be shown.

Four decades later, FORTY revisits the work of many of the artists who participated in the inaugural exhibition, in some cases featuring works shown in Rooms. Presented across the museum’s second floor galleries, FORTY revisits the radical vision and experimental spirit that characterized P.S.1’s early years.

FORTY features work by Cecile Abish, Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, John Baldessari, Jennifer Bartlett, Lynda Benglis, James Bishop, Daniel Buren, Colette, Ron Gorchov, Dan Graham, Robert Grosvenor, Marcia Hafif, David Hammons, Jene Highstein, Nancy Holt, Bill Jensen, Richard “Dickie” Landry, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Gordon Matta-Clark, John McCracken, Mary Miss, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Brian O’Doherty, Dennis Oppenheim, Nam June Paik, Howardena Pindell, Robert Ryman, Alan Saret, Joel Shapiro, Judith Shea, Charles Simonds, Keith Sonnier, Pat Steir, Michelle Stuart, Lawrence Weiner, Doug Wheeler, Jackie Winsor, and Robert Yasuda.

Listening stations throughout the exhibition highlight a series of audio conversations between Alanna Heiss and participating artists. Produced in connection with FORTY by Clocktower Productions, a non-profit arts organization and radio station directed by Alanna Heiss, the series provides visitors with an intimate view into P.S.1’s early history. The full audio guide is available online at: momaps1.org/forty.

Organized by Alanna Heiss, Founding Director, MoMA PS1, and Director, Clocktower Productions, with Beatrice Johnson, Associate Curator, Clocktower Productions; and Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

The exhibition is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America.

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Installation view of Lovers. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, July 30, 2016 – February 12, 2017. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar

Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers

July 30, 2016–April 16, 2017

Contemporary Galleries, second floor

Beginning in June 2016, The Museum of Modern Art is reinstalling its second-floor contemporary galleries with three large-scale, single-work installations by contemporary artists Teiji Furuhashi, Nan Goldin, and Tony Oursler. Presented in distinct galleries, the featured works on view are Furuhashi’s Lovers (1994), Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004), and Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16). Immersive in their construction and generous in size, the three large-scale galleries provide MoMA’s visitors with a unique opportunity to have deep encounters with these monumental works.

Lovers is an immersive, room-sized multimedia installation by Japanese artist Teiji Furuhashi (1960–1995). Life-sized images of the artist and other members of the Kyoto-based artist collective Dumb Type are projected onto the walls of a darkened room from a tower of computer-controlled video and slide projectors at its center. The figures move like specters around the perimeter of the space, in a looped choreographic sequence made variable by a visitor-activated sensor, which intervenes to restart one of the projections when triggered. Confined to their autonomous projections, these eponymous “lovers” overlap at moments within the sequence, whether running past each other or pausing in a gesture of embrace, yet their bodies never make contact. Made just one year before Furuhashi’s death from an AIDS-related illness, Lovers speaks to what the artist has described as “the theme of contemporary love in an ultra-romantic way.” Presented for the first time since its inaugural exhibition at MoMA in 1995, the installation showcases the results of an extensive conservation effort recently completed by the Museum’s media conservators. The installation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1; Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, MoMA; and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA. 

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

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Installation view of Kai Althoff: and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern). The Museum of Modern Art, New York, September 18, 2016–January 22, 2017. Photograph © Kai Althoff

Kai Althoff: and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern)

September 18, 2016–January 22, 2017

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery, sixth floor

Press Preview: Tuesday, September 13, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

On the occasion of Kai Althoff: and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern), the artist provides the following statement:

“The Museum of Modern Art granted me all freedom in using the gallery’s space and the Museum’s profound resources to present my work in the manner that I deem appropriate at this time of its existence and my life. I am very thankful for this, for even if I strain and press myself to come to a conclusion regarding the past, a lot of the things—and many call this work—I made up until today, I cannot defend or think of it as something people need to see or bother with. These were often just done for myself in the very first place.

Yet to leave it to others to put them in order and arrange them for display and consumption as a somewhat logical consequence deriving from this lack of my own ability to analyze and emotionally realize their gravity feels impossible and wrong; I am still alive, and this is an institution with a history that one cannot forego naïvely, though it may mean nothing much to me. Thus I feel I have to just show it in the manner that my mere self tells me to now. I have to look at things I have fabricated earlier in life, and I will give in to my immediate reaction emotionally and handle them accordingly, when deciding what to do with them now. This is why my gratitude for the above mentioned freedom from the institution is so huge.

Mind you, this is not all my pure will, but comes from the task of putting together a show, which I was asked to do, despite my confidence terrifyingly wobbling. And that it is for the right reasons, it being so wobbly, because of how wrong one can be in reality, when one thinks one does something significantly grand with the mind, heart and hands. But in the moment of making, the object you muster gains power over you and sometimes indeed this power may stem from the highest entity, from all that is beyond words and for a human to grapple. This I believe must have a reason, which in itself is more beautiful than a failed result, or a mediocre result. This happens in everybody’s life. There is no reason really why my things are exhibited in a museum and others’ are not.

And yet it is true: sometimes results are really something more. If there is such within what I did, I am not to say. But the people, who will come to see it can tell. I trust them totally, whether they care about art or not. Whether they are informed or ignorant and full of resentment. They do not need to know of more than what they will experience, and they should know, there is nothing to be understood. They have already understood enough, they can answer questions themselves and the questions they cannot answer themselves when walking, seeing, smelling and feeling while strutting through this exhibition are superfluous for now, and may clarify sometime later, or remain shelled forever.”

Kai Althoff

Organized by Laura Hoptman, Curator, and Margaret Ewing, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by the Ringier Collection, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Special thanks to Craig Robins and Jackie Soffer and to Erik Bruce Fabrik.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Interior of a Better Shelter prototype in Kawergosk Refugee Camp, Erbil, Iraq. Better Shelter. 2015.

Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter

October 01, 2016–January 22, 2017

Dunn Gallery, second floor

Press Preview: Thursday, September 29, 2016, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

The ways in which architecture and design have addressed contemporary notions of shelter, as seen through migration and global refugee emergencies, will be explored in the exhibition Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter. Bringing together works by architects, designers, and artists in a range of mediums and scales that respond to the complex circumstances brought about by forced displacement, the exhibition focuses on conditions that disrupt conventional images of the built environment as an arbiter of modernity and globalization. The prevalence of shelters and refugee camps calls into question the “safety” that they represent. Insecurities is organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, with Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Recent United Nations figures suggest that 65 million individuals worldwide are refugees, asylum seekers, and internally displaced persons. Where borders once marked the peripheries of nations, today, manifold territories on sea and land have blurred one’s potential confinement within spaces that are determined by external powers. Under these conditions, shelter has been redefined through constant movement or escape. By extension, refugee camps, while once considered to be temporary, are no longer so, and have become a locus through which to examine how human rights intersect with and complicate the making of cities.

Insecurities brings together a range of objects, including the jointly-designed IKEA Foundation-UNHCR-Better Shelter modular emergency structure, along with works by Estudio Teddy Cruz, Henk Wildschut, and Tiffany Chung, among others. Insecurities raises questions regarding how the design and representation of shelter as a source of security and stability ultimately reflects how refugees are living in permanent upheaval today.

A complementary website on Medium includes short essays and additional visual material by scholars, architects, artists, and designers from around the world.

Insecurities is part of Citizens and Borders, a series of discrete projects at MoMA related to works in the collection offering a critical perspective on histories of migration, territory, and displacement.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.
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Willi Baumeister. wie wohnen? Die Wohnung (How Should We Live? The Dwelling), Poster for an exhibition organized by the Deutsche Werkbund at the Weissenhofsiedlung, Stuttgart, Germany. 1927. Lithograph, 44 3/4 x 32 3/8" (113.7 x 82.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Philip Johnson

How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior

October 01, 2016–April 23, 2017

Third Floor Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, September 29, 2016, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

With How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior, The Museum of Modern Art examines a range of environments—domestic interiors, exhibition displays, and retail spaces—with the aim of exploring the complex collaborative partnerships, materials, and processes that have shaped the modernist interior. The exhibition focuses on specific interior spaces from the 1920s to the 1950s. Rather than concentrating on isolated masterworks, attention is given to the synthesis of design elements within each setting, and to the connection of external factors and attitudes—aesthetic, social, technological, and political—that these propositions express in material and spatial form.

Bringing together a number of recent acquisitions by the Department of Architecture and Design of work by major women architect-designers, How Should We Live? looks at several designers’ own living spaces and at frequently neglected areas in the field of design, including textile furnishings, wallpapers, kitchens, temporary exhibitions, and promotional displays. Noted partnerships featured in the exhibition will include Lilly Reich and Mies van der Rohe, Grete Lihotzky and Ernst May, Eileen Gray and Jean Badovici, Aino and Alvar Aalto, Charles and Ray Eames, Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter, and Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier.

Divided into three chronological groupings—the late 1920s to the early 1930s, the late 1930s to the mid-1940s, and the late 1940s into the 1950s—the exhibition brings together over 200 objects in total, but highlights a number of large-scale interiors by the aforementioned designers, including Lihotzky’s Frankfurt Kitchen (1926–27), Reich and Mies’s Velvet and Silk Café (1927), and Perriand and Le Corbusier’s study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil (1959).

Organized by Juliet Kinchin, Curator, with Luke Baker, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Albert Popewell, Tamara Dobson, and Caro Kenyatta in Cleopatra Jones, 1973. Directed by Jack Starrett (American, 1936–1989). Warner Bros. Film Study Center Special Collections, The Museum of Modern Art

Making Faces: Images of Exploitation and Empowerment in Cinema

October 14, 2016–April 30, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Lobby

Making Faces presents a selection of images from the Department of Film’s extensive collection of film stills that explore the representation of historical “otherness” onscreen. This exhibition examines the attempts of commercial film studios to aestheticize identity at various historical moments. Photographic enlargements capture both conscious and unconscious deviations from cultural, social, racial, and gender expectations from the silent era through the Blaxploitation films of the 1970s.

Organized by Ashley Swinnerton, Collection Specialist, and Dessane Cassell, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Film.

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Study for Education by Stone (Educação pela pedra) (detail). 2016. Chalk

Projects 105: Cinthia Marcelle

October 23, 2016–September 04, 2017

Duplex Gallery and Cinema, MoMA PS1

Projects 105 presents Education by Stone (2016), a new site-specific installation by Cinthia Marcelle (Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1974) and the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York. Recently selected to represent Brazil at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Marcelle is known for her installations, performances, and videos, which stage forms of labor to produce poetic situations. Occupying MoMA PS1’s Duplex gallery, the installation will insert chalk, a pedagogical material to which she has re-turned throughout her career, in the building’s formerly scholastic space. Numerous rods of chalk will be lodged into the fissures and openings of the gallery’s brick walls from floor to ceiling, revealing the material’s inherent instability and fragility.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Cinthia Marcelle has had solo exhibitions in South America and Europe. She recently participated in the 11th Sharjah Biennial (2015), and will represent Brazil in the 57th Venice Biennale (2017). In 2006, she was the recipient of the International Prize for Performance for her work Gray Demonstration (2006). In 2010, she was awarded the Future Generation Prize.

Organized by Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by The Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Sascha Braunig, Coverage, 2011, oil on canvas over panel, 22 × 15 in. (55.88 × 38.10 cm) Photo: Mark Woods, courtesy Foxy Production, New York

Sascha Braunig: Shivers

October 23, 2016–March 12, 2017

MoMA PS1

With more than twenty works made over the last five years, Shivers showcases Braunig’s unique approach to the studio portrait. Beginning with meticulously rendered paintings of fantastical sculptural constructions, the artist has deployed a range of pictorial techniques to depict bodies under duress. The figures in her work are compressed by their environments, stretched and twisted across armatures, and often overwhelmed by their surroundings. Some are irradiated by industrial light, sutured into uncomfortable hybrids, and hollowed out. Drawing inspiration from the distorted bodies that litter the histories of modern painting, Braunig adapts these legacies to the discomforts and instabilities of contemporary life. In more recent works, her figures seem to turn on themselves, testing their own limits and those of the settings that confine them. While evocatively dystopic, her paintings also subtly empower their vulnerable subjects, advocating a humanist art for an age in which individual experience seems threatened by forces beyond our control.

Sascha Braunig: Shivers is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1.

The exhibition is supported by the Ava Olivia Knoll Fund and The Tom Slaughter Emerging Artists Endowment Fund.

Additional funding is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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