Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents the most comprehensive exhibition ever organized of photographer Stephen Shore’s work, on view from November 19, 2017, until May 28, 2018. The exhibition tracks the artist’s work chronologically, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current work with digital platforms. Stephen Shore establishes the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argues for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Born in 1947, Shore spearheaded the New Color Photography movement in the United States in the 1970s, and became a major catalyst in the renewal of documentary photography in the late 1990s, both in the US and Europe, blending the tradition of American photographers such as Walker Evans with influences from various artistic movements, including Pop, Conceptualism, and even Photo-Realism. Shore’s images seem to achieve perfect neutrality, in both subject matter and approach. His approach cannot be reduced to a style but is best summed up with a few principles from which he has seldom deviated: the search for maximum clarity, the absence of retouching and reframing, and respect for natural light. Above all, he exercises discipline, limiting his shots as much as possible—one shot of a subject, and very little editing afterward.

Stephen Shore is organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 
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New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive

December 01, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented as part of the Club 57 exhibition, this survey celebrates film and video created during New York’s post-punk period, including landmark examples of No Wave, Cinema of Transgression, and independent films that grew out of the East Village scene and were first exhibited in area venues like Club 57, New Cinema, Millennium, and others. The richly diverse artists working during the heyday of the downtown scene left a vibrant legacy of Super8 filmmaking; collaborative works that have resonance as neighborhood home movies; and cinema that engages auteurist and genre cinema traditions, or upends them completely. Many of the filmmakers will be present, and we will premiere a number of recent MoMA preservations of little-seen and iconic titles alike.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

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To Save and Project: The 15th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation

January 18, 2018–February 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The 15th edition of MoMA’s annual international festival of newly preserved films, To Save and Project, features a diverse selection of titles from Asia, Europe, Africa, Latin America, Australia, and the US, in formats ranging from 16mm to Cinerama.

A strong selection of films by women includes narrative features by two major artists, Chantal Akerman and Ida Lupino, as well as avant-garde work by Sheila Paige, Peggy Ahwesh, Barbara Hammer, and Maria Lassnig, and a selection of the travelogues shot in the 1920s and ’30s by the international adventurer Aloha Wanderwell.

Two classics of African cinema, Gaston Kaboré’s Wend Kuuni(1982) and Med Hondo’s Soleil Ô (1970), join work from the Philippines, Hong Kong, and Mexico to illustrate the global reach of current preservation practice, while the classical Hollywood cinema is represented by three restorations from MoMA: Douglas Fairbanks’s The Three Musketeers (1921) and two rediscoveries from William K. Howard, Transatlantic (1931) and Sherlock Holmes (1932).

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Cindi Rowell and Brittany Shaw.

Electronic subtitling provided by Sub-Ti Ltd.

This exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Winter/Spring 2018 VW Sunday Sessions

January 28, 2018–April 15, 2018

 

The sixth season of MoMA PS1’s VW Sunday Sessions continues on January 28, with twelve more weekly programs that address a range of current social and political issues, explore the life and legacy of alternative spaces, and foster cross-disciplinary collaboration. Encompassing performance, music, dance, conversation, and film, VW Sunday Sessions underscores how live art forms encourage engagement with our contemporary world. Featuring a wide range of artists, curators, collectives, and activist groups, the full schedule of programs follows below.

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Maria Lassnig: New York Films 1970–1980

February 01, 2018–June 18, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the world premiere of a series of experimental films the artist Maria Lassnig made in New York City in the 1970s. This presentation focuses on a selection of newly discovered and restored films that examine ways of looking and seeing bound up in bodily sensation. Newly restored by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in close collaboration with the Austrian Film Museum, these films incorporate animation, sound, and poetic voiceovers that encourage entry into the artist’s internal world. The restoration was carried out in close collaboration with the Austrian Film Museum under the directorships of Alexander Horwath and Michael Loebenstein, who were indispensable to the restoration of these documents that attest to core principles of Lassnig’s thinking and practice across canvas and celluloid.

Maria Lassnig: New York Films 1970–1980 highlights both finished films and film fragments, all produced using 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8, comprised of live-action footage, animated drawings, animated paper cut-outs, and documentary footage of the artist’s studio and her surroundings in New York. These newly surfaced films enrich and complicate our understandings of Lassnig’s approach to figuration and self-portraiture, as well as other key themes that she investigated throughout her career, including the social roles assigned to women, the tension between public engagement and private seclusion, and questions of technological advancement, especially of imaging technologies and shifts in the way images circulate.

To kick off this exhibition, a world premiere screening accompanied by a comprehensive presentation detailing the restoration process will take place on January 29 at The Museum of Modern Art as part of the museum’s Modern Mondays series as well as To Save and Project: The 15th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation.

Organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000)

February 03, 2018–March 11, 2018

Floor two, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents a major performance installation by Tania Bruguera (Cuban, born 1968), Untitled (Havana, 2000), for the first time since acquiring it in 2015, from February 3 through March 11, 2018. Initially conceived for the 7th Havana Biennial, the work was first presented in the Cabaña Fortress, a military bunker used as a jail for prisoners of conscience during the Cuban Revolution. The Fortress was used from colonial times through the early years of the Revolution as a site where the counter-revolutionary opposition was submitted to torture and execution by firing squad. Combining milled sugarcane, video footage of Fidel Castro, and live performance presented in near-total darkness, the work suggests the contradictions of life following the Cuban Revolution. The work, which was on view for mere hours before being shut down by the Cuban government in 2000, signifies Bruguera’s complex relationship to authority.

Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000) is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, and performances produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

The exhibition is made possible by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.
 
Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
Special thanks to Air Water & Earth and to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.
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Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil

February 11, 2018–June 03, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, February 6, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure for the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features nearly 120 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila―as she is affectionately known in Brazil―studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her “military service in Cubism,” ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette. The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Brazil, through Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, charting her involvement with an increasingly international artistic community, and her role in the emergence of modernism in Brazil; in 1928, Tarsila painted Abaporu, which quickly spawned the Anthropophagous Manifesto, and became the banner for this transformative artistic movement that sought to digest external influences and produce an art for and of Brazil itself.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, former Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Stephanie D’Alessandro, former Gary C. and Frances Comer Curator of International Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago; with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Modern Women’s Fund, and by the Vicky and Joseph Safra Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Clarice Oliveira Tavares, Yvonne Dadoo Ader, and by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

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Doc Fortnight 2018: MoMA’s International Festival of Nonfiction Film and Media

February 15, 2018–February 26, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Doc Fortnight, MoMA’s annual international festival of nonfiction film, returns for its 17th year with 12 days of innovative approaches to documentary filmmaking from February 15-26. Featuring a diverse assortment of feature and short films from across the globe, the festival continues to highlight the vibrant and varied styles of independent filmmakers—both emerging and established—around the world.

Recognizing the recent passing of award-winning filmmaker, Jonathan Demme, this year’s festival includes a retrospective of several documentaries made during his prolific career. At a time of escalating sociopolitical tension, Doc Fortnight continues its history of showcasing nonfiction film that challenges our perceptions of the changing world and the traditional model of documentary cinema.

Organized by Kathy Brew, Guest Curator, with Gianna Collier-Pitts

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

 
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MoMA Presents: Joshua Bonnetta and J. P. Sniadecki’s El Mar La Mar

February 23, 2018–March 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

What is seen tells the stories of what is unseen. Filmed over two years in the treacherous Sonoran Desert near the US-Mexico border, El Mar La Mar enlightens the current debates on border security and immigration, but in unexpected ways.

Grainy 16mm-turned-digital images of the endless horizon, sun-scorched land, and bare sky introduce a forbidding terrain. Shots of empty water bottles, pocket-sized religious artifacts, and broken shoes bear witness to the hardship thousands have endured, while voiceovers recount tales of desperation, sightings of death, and encounters with mysterious creatures. Intricate sonic elements bring the desert to life, but not without eliciting fear. Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab alumnus J. P. Sniadecki and multimedia artist Joshua Bonnetta take a truly experimental approach to documentary in this meditative, complex work of filmic poetry.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

El Mar La Mar. 2017. USA. Directed by Joshua Bonnetta, J. P. Sniadecki. 16mm converted to DCP. English, Spanish; English subtitles. 94 min.

Friday, February 23, 7:00 p.m, includes discussion with the filmmakers, Theater 2 
Saturday, February 24, 4:00 p.m., includes discussion with the filmmakers, Theater 2
Sunday, February 25, 5:00 p.m., Theater 2
Monday, February 26, 4:00 p.m., Theater 2
Tuesday, February 27, 6:30 p.m., Education and Research Building, The Celeste Bartos Theater 3
Wednesday, February 28, 6:30 p.m., Theater 2
Thursday, March 1, 7:00 p.m., Theater 1

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