Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Print-Friendly Schedule

Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil

February 11, 2018–June 03, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, February 6, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure for the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features nearly 120 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila―as she is affectionately known in Brazil―studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her “military service in Cubism,” ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette. The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Brazil, through Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, charting her involvement with an increasingly international artistic community, and her role in the emergence of modernism in Brazil; in 1928, Tarsila painted Abaporu, which quickly spawned the Anthropophagous Manifesto, and became the banner for this transformative artistic movement that sought to digest external influences and produce an art for and of Brazil itself.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, former Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Stephanie D’Alessandro, former Gary C. and Frances Comer Curator of International Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago; with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Modern Women’s Fund, and by the Vicky and Joseph Safra Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Clarice Oliveira Tavares, Yvonne Dadoo Ader, and by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

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Modern Matinees: Delmer Daves and H. C. Potter in Resonance

March 01, 2018–April 27, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Delmer Daves and H. C. Potter were contemporaries and friends who, while not necessarily household names, were essential contract directors during the Golden Age of the Hollywood studio system. This brief survey, which includes prints from MoMA’s collection, captures both in top form.

Delmer Daves (1904–1977) studied law at Stanford University but became intrigued by the industry emerging in his backyard and ended up working as a prop boy on Westerns while completing his degree. In 1929 his script So This Is College was produced for MGM, and he went on to write screenplays for The Petrified Forest (1936) and Love Affair (1939), among others. In 1943 Daves made his directorial debut with Destination Tokyo, starring Cary Grant, though he truly found his niche when he returned to Westerns. In films like Broken Arrow (1950) and 3:10 to Yuma(1957), introspective, conflicted men must confront both nature and human violence. Late in his career, in 1963, Daves adapted Earl Hamner, Jr.’s novel Spencer’s Mountain, a starring vehicle for Henry Fonda and Maureen O’Hara that went on to become the basis for the popular television series The Waltons.

Henry Codman “Hank” Potter (1904–1977), born into a prominent New York family, graduated from Yale University and, in 1927, cofounded the Hampton Players, one America’s first summer theater groups. He soon advanced to Broadway, where his success eventually led to his first Hollywood feature, Beloved Enemy (1936), a romantic drama obsessed by the seemingly eternal British/Irish divide. However, Potter’s true strength was the comedy film—the more hysteria and doubletalk between characters, the better! Best known for quick-witted classics such as Hellzapoppin’ (1941), Mr. Lucky (1943), and the iconic Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948), Potter hit his directorial stride inveigling comical and sometimes tart performances from his actors (including Cary Grant, who shines as both Mr. Blandings and Mr. Lucky). In 1949, while under contract at RKO during Howard Hughes’s ownership of the studio, Potter ran into some difficulties with the eccentric Texan. Just days before photography commenced on a film tentatively titled The High Frontier, which would involve use of the United States Air Force’s massive B-36, Potter received a telegram saying the production was cancelled. There was no further communication from Hughes, and Potter’s notable career lost momentum.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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2018 VW Sunday Sessions Commission

March 11, 2018–March 11, 2018

 

For the 2018 VW Sunday Sessions commission, artist and performer Colin Self presents Siblings, the sixth and final part of The Elation Series, a sci-fi opera encompassing performance, music, sculpture, and video that he has been developing since 2011. The performance will be presented at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on March 11, 2018, closing day of MoMA PS1’s winter exhibitions.

A playful examination of Donna J. Haraway’s recent book Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, the performance offers new ways of re-configuring our relationship to the earth and its inhabitants in the wake of ecological devastation, foregrounding the necessity of new narrative structures to realize a better world. Structured like a game, Siblings functions as a participatory performance, assigning the audience roles and responsibilities. Divided into analysts, activists, archivists, and spies, these groups expand their subjective encounters of text, song, and dance into ruptures of narrative analysis.

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Being: New Photography 2018

March 18, 2018–August 19, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 13, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art presents Being: New Photography 2018, the latest presentation in MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series. Since its inception in 1985, New Photography has introduced more than 100 artists from around the globe, and it is a key component of the Museum’s contemporary program. Every two years, New Photography presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human. On view from March 18 through August 19, 2018, the exhibition includes over 80 new and recent works by 17 artists from ten countries. While at various stages in their careers, all are presenting their work at the Museum for the first time.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology.

The artists included are:

Sofia Borges (Brazilian, born 1984)
Matthew Connors (American, born 1976)
Sam Contis (American, born 1982)
Shilpa Gupta (Indian, born 1976)
Adelita Husni-Bey (Italian, born 1985)
Yazan Khalili (Palestinian, born Syria, 1981)
Harold Mendez (American, born 1977)
Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopian, born 1974)
Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương (American, born Hong Kong, 1979; American, born 1976)
B. Ingrid Olson (American, born 1987)
Joanna Piotrowska (Polish, born 1985)
Em Rooney (American, born 1983)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya (American, born 1982)
Andrzej Steinbach (German, born Poland, 1983)
Stephanie Syjuco (American, born Philippines, 1974)
Carmen Winant (American, born 1983)

Being: New Photography 2018 is organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund , David Dechman and Michel Mercure, and The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Courtney Finch Taylor and by James G. Niven.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Come Together: Music Festival and Label Market

March 24, 2018–March 24, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 and iconic record shop Other Music have teamed up to present the second annual Come Together: Music Festival and Label Market on Saturday, March 24, offering live performances, films, workshops, and panels that celebrate the interactive ecosystem of local and international music communities, along with a label market featuring over 75 participants. Part of MoMA PS1’s VW Sunday Sessions, Come Together reasserts the central and essential role that communities play in both the creation and consumption of new sounds, recasting the fading record store experience for the current moment. This year features extended festival programming, with daytime programming and the label market from 12:00 through 6:00 p.m., and an expanded slate of performances from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

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New Directors/New Films 2018

March 28, 2018–April 08, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Now in its 47th year, the renowned New Directors/New Films festival, presented jointly by The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, introduces New York audiences to the work of emerging or not-yet-established filmmakers from around the world. The festival takes place at the Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center and at The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters at MoMA.

New Directors/New Films is presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art.

The 2018 feature committee was comprised of Josh Siegel, Curator; La Frances Hui, Associate Curator; Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator and Brittany Shaw, Department Assistant, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Dennis Lim, Director of Programming; Florenze Almozini, Associate Director of Programming; Dan Sullivan, Assistant Programmer, and Tyler Wilson, Programming Coordinator, the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

The exhibition is sponsored by LG Signature.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund of The Museum of Modern Art, Film Society’s New Wave, The New York Times, American Airlines, The Village Voice, Shutterstock, and Hudson Hotel.

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Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 290 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, this inclusive retrospective, which will be seen in its entirety only at the Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor – the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The exhibition will encompass the wide range of diverse mediums that Piper has explored for over 50 years: drawing, photography, works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sculpture, and sound. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over 10 years, and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist in the 56th Venice Biennale of 2015 and Germany’s Käthe Kollwitz Prize for 2018.
 
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
 
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
 
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and David Platzker, former Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
 

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and Lannan Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Marilyn and Larry Fields, and by Marieluise Hessel Artzt.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Son of 3-D Funhouse

April 09, 2018–April 11, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Our ongoing series highlighting digital preservations and restorations of stereoscopic films from the analog era returns. It takes a great deal of dedication and detective work to reassemble these wonders of mid-20th-century technology, most of which were discarded by their producers once the 3-D fad of the early 1950s had passed. Presented here are two extremely rare, newly restored features, The Maze and Cease Fire, as reconstructed in digital 3-D by Greg Kintz and Robert Furmanek of the 3-D Film Archive, as well as one of the pinnacle achievements of the format, Roy Ward Baker’s desert noir Inferno, as restored by the late Daniel L. Symmes for Twentieth Century Fox.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

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Kazuo Miyagawa: Japan’s Greatest Cinematographer

April 12, 2018–April 29, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The most influential cinematographer of postwar Japanese cinema, Kazuo Miyagawa (1908–1999) worked intimately with Yasujirô Ozu, Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, and Kon Ichikawa on some of their most important films. It was Miyagawa who, in his astonishing versatility, helped perfect Ozu’s exquisitely framed tatami-level compositions in Floating Weeds (1959); the long, choreographed tracking sequences of Mizoguchi’s Ugetsu (1953); the multiple perspectives and jump cuts of Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950) and Yojimbo (1961); and the innovative use of cameras from different vantage points in Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad (1965).

This first major US retrospective of Miyagawa’s work in more than 35 years opens with a rare screening of Hiroshi Inagaki’s 1943 version of The Rickshaw Man and the 4K restoration premiere of Ozu’s Floating Weeds (1959), a special event introduced by Miyagawa’s son Ichiro and Miyagawa’s camera assistant Masahiro Miyajima. A career-spanning survey of Miyagawa’s cinematography then continues both at MoMA and Japan Society throughout the month. Additionally, new 4K restorations of Kenji Mizoguchi’s A Story From Chikamatsu (1953) and Sansho the Bailiff (1954), both shot by Miyagawa, will run at Film Forum from April 6 through 12.

Miyagawa admired the stark, high-contrast lighting of German Expressionist films of the 1920s, and when he began his career at the Nikkatsu studio in the 1930s, he elevated routine melodramas and musicals through his own stylized black-and-white photography, most notably in Masahiro Makino’s Singing Lovebirds (1939), using mirrors outdoors to create dappled sunlight, for example, or a telephoto lens to suggest emotional distance. But it was his later experimentation with color for which he became legendary. Miyagawa explored the painterly, dramatic, and symbolic qualities of color in films as varied as Mizoguchi’s New Tales of the Taira Clan (1955), Kazuo Ikehiro’s Zatoichi and the Chest of Gold (1964), and Masahira Shinoda’s Silence (1971), based on the same Shûsaku Endô’s novel as the later Martin Scorsese adaptation, as well as Shinoda’s Ballad of Orin (1977) and Gonza the Spearman (1986).

Miyagawa is credited with having invented a color technology, the “bleach bypass,” on Ichikawa’s Her Brother (1960), a process by which he gained greater control over saturation and tonality. The effect is to cast a silvery sheen over the color image, a look that has been used in countless films since then, from cinematographer Roger Deakins’s work on Michael Radford’s 1984 to Janusz Kamínski’s work on Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan (1998). Another of Miyagawa’s masterful achievements was on Kon Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad (1965), where he supervised 164 cameramen, who used 234 different lenses to capture the dramatic intensity of competition in extreme close-up. The enduring influence of Miyagawa’s innovations and artistic sensibility is further reflected in rare 35mm screenings of Hiroshi Inagaki’s Children Hand in Hand (1948), Kozaburo Yoshimura’s Reminiscence (1953) and Bamboo Doll of Echizen (1963), and Yasuzo Masumura’s Irezumi (The Spider Tattoo) (1966).

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Aiko Masubuchi and Kazu Watanabe, film programmers at Japan Society.

Special thanks to The National Film Archive of Tokyo, The Japan Foundation, Kadokawa, and Janus Films for the loan of prints and digital restorations.

The exhibition is made possible by MUFG.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.

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Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People

April 15, 2018–September 10, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 will present the first US solo museum exhibition of artist Fernando Palma Rodríguez (Mexican, b. 1957), on view from April 15 to September 10, 2018. Since the early 1990s, Palma Rodríguez has combined his training as an artist and mechanical engineer to create robotic sculptures that utilize custom software to perform complex, narrative choreographies. His works respond to issues facing indigenous communities in Mexico, addressing human and land rights, including the violent targeting of these communities, and urgent environmental crises. These concerns have particular significance to the district of Milpa Alta, an agricultural region outside of Mexico City where Palma Rodríguez lives and runs Calpulli Tecalco, a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of indigenous culture.

Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Special thanks to Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Oaxaca.

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