Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 presents a new series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) created between 2015 and 2017. Depicting magnified details of human skin in high resolution, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Featuring six works, which range in height from twelve to nineteen feet, Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is on view through September 3.

Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

Since the 1970s, Sue Coe (British and American, b. 1951) has worked at the juncture of art and activism to expose injustices and abuses of power. Protesting various forms of exploitation and violence, she tackles issues of sexism, racism, economic inequality, xenophobia, and animal cruelty. On view through September 9, Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance highlights these concerns through a selection of drawings, prints, and large-scale collages, as well as illustrations that Coe produced for newspaper opinion pages.

Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art

June 09, 2018–October 07, 2018

The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

In partnership with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne will present MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art as part of its Winter Masterpieces series. MoMA at NGV will provide a unique survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s iconic collection. Consisting of approximately 200 key works, arranged chronologically into eight thematic sections, the exhibition will trace the development of art and design from late-19th-century urban and industrial transformation, through to the digital and global present.

The emergence of a “new art” at the turn of the 20th century will be represented by some of MoMA’s earliest acquisitions, including masterworks by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne as well as an architectural model by Le Corbusier featured in MoMA’s first architecture exhibition in 1932. Works by pioneering Cubist and Futurist artists, including Pablo Picasso and Umberto Boccioni, will appear alongside the radically abstracted forms present in graphic design, furniture, and textiles from the Bauhaus and in works by artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian. The surreal visual language of paintings by artists like Salvador Dalí and Frida Kahlo and the spontaneity and tactility advanced in works by prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Alexander Calder and Jackson Pollock will also be included.

Developments in art from the 1960s to the 1980s, from Minimalism through Postmodernism, will be explored through the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Sol LeWitt, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring, among others. Significant works of late 20th-century and early 21st century art and design, including major pieces by Kara Walker, Rineke Dijkstra, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson, Huang Yong Ping, Mona Hatoum, El Anatsui and Camille Henrot, will foreground ideas around cultural and national identity, and mobility in a globalized world. Tomohiro Nishikado’s pioneering computer game Space Invaders and Shigetaka Kurita’s original set of 176 emoji will further complement the discussion of contemporary topics.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria.

Organized by Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Juliet Kinchin, Curator of Modern Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Miranda Wallace, Senior Curator, International Exhibition Projects, NGV.

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If Everything Is Sculpture Why Make Sculpture? Artist’s Choice: Peter Fischli

Ongoing from June 11

 

This summer, Snowman, a sculpture composed of an actual snowman encased in a glass-door freezer, by Peter Fischli (Swiss, b. 1952) and his longtime collaborator David Weiss (Swiss, 1946–2012), comes to the Museum’s Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden as part of Fischli’s Artist’s Choice presentation. Here, Fischli borrows a question inscribed on a painting presented outdoors by artist Ben Vautier (French, b. 1935): “If everything is sculpture why make sculpture?” Along with Snowman, nearly 20 objects selected by Fischli offer answers to this question.

Initiated in 1989, the Artist’s Choice series invites contemporary artists to organize exhibitions drawn from MoMA’s collection. Fischli is the 13th artist to participate in the series, and the first to do so in the Sculpture Garden.

Snowman (2016) is an updated version of a 1987 site-specific work by Fischli and Weiss that was commissioned by a German thermic power plant whose energy—in the form of heat, paradoxically—was used to keep the snowman perpetually frozen. Though a snowman is, as Fischli observes, a “sculpture that almost anyone can make” simply by rolling three spheres of snow and setting them atop one another, Fischli and Weiss’s Snowman is dependent on a technically complex apparatus for its year-round subsistence. Over the course of three decades of collaboration, Fischli and Weiss shared an interest in exploring inherent contradictions and the extraordinary potential of everyday objects and situations.

Snowman takes on new associations in the setting of MoMA’s Sculpture Garden and in the company of works that span the last century, by artists from Henri Matisse and Aristide Maillol to Tony Smith and Katharina Fritsch. Together, Snowman and its companions testify to the expansive possibilities for sculpture today, and to the role of museums in nurturing and preserving their collections.

Organized by Peter Fischli and Cara Manes, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Artist’s Choice exhibition series is made possible through The Agnes Gund Artist’s Choice Fund endowed by Iara Lee and George Gund III, Lulie and Gordon Gund, Ann and Graham Gund, and Sarah and Geoffrey Gund.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Young Architects Program 2018: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine

June 28, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

Hide & Seek by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of Arup, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard from June 28 through September 3, 2018. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s construction is a responsive, kinetic environment that features eight intersecting elements arrayed across the entirety of the MoMA PS1 courtyard. Hide & Seek serves as a temporary urban landscape for the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series.

Now in its 19th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues.

Inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city, Hide & Seek enables surprising connections throughout the adjoining courtyards of MoMA PS1 and the surrounding streets. Each of the horizontal structures contains two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors suspended from a frame. The mirrors move in the wind or with human touch, permitting dislocating views and unique spatial relationships across the space that foster unexpected interactions. As the vanishing points disappear into the depths of the mirrors, the illusion of space expands beyond the physical boundaries of the Museum and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside. In reference to these unpredictable gestures, the upper registers of the steel structure are filled with a cloud of mist and light, responding to the activity and life of Warm Up at night. Scriptive elements, including a runway and a large-scale hammock, invite visitors into performance and establish platforms for improvisation.

Warm Up 2018

June 30, 2018–September 01, 2018

 

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up returns in 2018 with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music. Taking place every Saturday from June 30 through September 1, Warm Up celebrates a wide range of artists: emerging and established, local and global, and across genres. This year’s program welcomes Omar-S, SOB x RBE, HoodCelebrityy, Cashmere Cat, Kelsey Lu, Maxo Kream, Lizzo, A-Trak, Gang Gang Dance, Josey Rebelle, Starchild + The New Romantic, and DJ Kass, as well as the New York debut of Laff Trax, a new collaboration by Chaz Bear of Toro y Moi and Jason Chung of Nosaj Thing, and a final-day headlining set by members of Discwoman, a collective that exclusively represents women and genderqueer artists.

Now in its 21st season, Warm Up is one of the longest running music programs housed within a museum. As an integral part of MoMA PS1’s curatorial program, Warm Up seeks to elevate innovative and underrepresented voices and connect fans with music’s most important artists. The program’s alumni include contemporary creators Four Tet, Solange, Black Dice, Cardi B, Jamie XX, and Laurel Halo, as well as legendary DJs including Ritchie Hawtin, DJ Premier, and Total Freedom.

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Rockaway! 2018: Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama

July 01, 2018–September 03, 2018

Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden

This summer, MoMA PS1 will present Yayoi Kusama’s (Japan, b. 1929) site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden (1966–present) as the third iteration of Rockaway!, a free public art festival presented with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Narcissus Garden will be on view from July 1 through September 3, 2018 at the Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden.

Comprised of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres, Narcissus Garden will be on view in a former train garage from the time when Fort Tilden was an active U.S. military base. The mirrored metal surfaces will reflect the industrial surroundings of the now-abandoned building, drawing attention to Fort Tilden’s history as well as the devastating damage inflicted on many buildings in the area by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Rockaway! 2018 is presented by MoMA PS1 with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980

July 15, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, July 10, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the architecture of the former Yugoslavia with Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, the first major US exhibition to study the remarkable body of work that sparked international interest during the 45 years of the country’s existence. The exhibition will include more than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region, introducing the exceptional built work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience for the first time.

The architecture that emerged during this period—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist “social condensers”—is a manifestation of the radical pluralism, hybridity, and idealism that characterized the Yugoslav state itself. Exploring themes of large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture, Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature work by important architects, including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić. From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition will examine the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character.

Organized by Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and Vladimir Kulić, Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University, with Anna Kats, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Constantin Brancusi Sculpture

July 22, 2018–February 18, 2019

Floor Two, Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Looking back at the first showing of Constantin Brancusi’s work (1876–1957) in the United States, in the 1913 Armory Show, one writer reflected that sculptures on view were “disturbing, so disturbing indeed that they completely altered the attitude of a great many New Yorkers towards a whole branch of art.” Indeed, Brancusi’s beguilingly simple forms looked like nothing else, then or since.

Rather than modeling clay like his peers, Brancusi carved his work directly from wood or stone, or cast it in bronze. Simultaneously, he rejected realism, preferring that his sculptures evoke rather than resemble the subjects named in their titles. Brancusi made bases for many of his sculptures, themselves complex constructions that became part of the work. He often moved works from base to base, or placed them directly on the floor of his studio, so that they lived in the world alongside ordinary objects, and among people.

Born in rural Romania, Brancusi moved to Paris in 1904, where he established his studio and quickly immersed himself in avant-garde art circles. In his adopted city, he embraced an experimental modern spirit, including an interest in modern machines and popular culture. With his friend Man Ray, he made films that captured his life in the studio—working with his materials and muses, activating his artworks through movement and recombination, and revealing his sources of inspiration such as animals at play, light in nature, and dance. Yet until his death he proudly presented himself as an outsider—cultivating his image as a peasant, with a long beard, work shirt, and sandals. The contradiction also informs his art making, which was dependent on ancient techniques as much as contemporary technologies.

This exhibition celebrates MoMA’s extraordinary holdings—11 sculptures by Brancusi will be shown together for the first time, alongside drawings, photographs, and films. A selection of never-before-seen archival materials shed light on the artist’s working process and relationships with friends, sitters, and patrons, including this Museum. What emerges is a rich portrait of an artist whose risk-taking and inventive approach to form changed the course of the art that followed.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture

The exhibition is made possible by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Major support is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by Jack Shear with The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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Modern Matinees: Vincent Price

September 05, 2018–October 31, 2018

 

Before he became synonymous with the ghoulish and macabre, channeling Edgar Allan Poe and sundry possessed madmen, Vincent Price (American, 1911–1993) graduated from Yale University with an art history degree. While in London to continue his studies, Price was drawn to the stage, and by 1935 he was a member of Orson Welles’s Mercury Theatre. With his distinctive voice—part effete, part diabolical—and imposing 6’4″ frame, Price was truly a rarity compared to the typical Hollywood lead. His earliest film roles consisted of character parts in costume dramas, and it wasn’t until 1940, when he appeared in The House of the Seven Gables, that Price’s predilection for Gothic narratives was revealed.

After a string of high-profile roles in Brigham Young (1940), Laura (1944), and The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), Price became a true lead, and his versatility—cad, romantic, adventurer, villain—was reflected by the diversity of the films he appeared in (all while remaining quite attached to 20th Century Fox). In 1946, in a review of Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s DragonwyckThe New York Times presciently encapsulated Price’s appeal by referring to his performance as an example of “suave diabolism.”

Price cleverly continued to mix up the roles he choose, from a Southwestern land boss in The Baron of Arizona (1950) to Omar Khayyam in Son of Sinbad (1955) to the ringmaster in The Big Circus (1959), but a string of low-budget horror films would come to define his legacy—beginning with 1958’s The Fly and reaching a crescendo in his Poe-inspired collaborations with Roger Corman, including House of Usher(1960), The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), and The Masque of the Red Death (1964). Price’s mischievous raised eyebrows and devilish vocal modulations made him perfect for these roles, and he relished his eccentric performances. Toward the end of his career, Price’s reputation was cemented with a younger generation when he provided the iconic voice-over soliloquy for Michael Jackson’s hit “Thriller,” and later worked with Tim Burton on Edward Scissorhands (1990), his final live-action film appearance.

This wide-ranging look at the career of Vincent Price is drawn mainly from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

 
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