Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Reza Abdoh

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first major retrospective of pioneering theater director and playwright Reza Abdoh (Iranian-American, 1963–95), who was one of the most compelling figures in American experimental theater when he died of AIDS-related complications in 1995 at only 32 years old. Abdoh’s provocative and challenging work confronted the humanitarian catastrophe of the AIDS epidemic and the culture wars of the Reagan era, investigating a range of urgent social issues that remain equally relevant today, including those surrounding sexual orientation, gender, race, class, and privilege.

Co-organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy for Bidoun. The exhibition is co-produced with the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, where it will be presented from February 2 to April 29, 2019 and organized in collaboration with Krist Gruijthuijsen, Director.

Body Armor

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

The four artists in Body Armor—Maryam Hoseini, Zadie Xa, Delilah Montoya, and Ana Pellicer—present approaches to bodily adornment in contemporary life, placing focus on the garments and objects we wear to signal belonging, confer status, or project strength. Wearable ornaments have distinguished their owners for centuries across global cultures, embellishing appearance, granting access, and enhancing power. These distinctive markers allow individuals to move fluidly through a range of identities, operating as instruments of social influence that participate in a shared cultural language predicated on existing hierarchies and stereotypes.

Body Armor reimagines these adornments, and critiques the traditional, often colonial, contexts in which they are deployed. Pushing the boundaries of how we construe femininity across a range of cultures, geographies, and generations, these four artists trace the various ways these symbols work both in public and private space to define features of our cultural life, sense of self, social rankings, and communities.

Body Armor is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

 

MoMA PS1 presents a new series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) created between 2015 and 2017. Depicting magnified details of human skin in high resolution, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Featuring six works, which range in height from twelve to nineteen feet, Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is on view through September 3.

Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

Since the 1970s, Sue Coe (British and American, b. 1951) has worked at the juncture of art and activism to expose injustices and abuses of power. Protesting various forms of exploitation and violence, she tackles issues of sexism, racism, economic inequality, xenophobia, and animal cruelty. On view through September 9, Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance highlights these concerns through a selection of drawings, prints, and large-scale collages, as well as illustrations that Coe produced for newspaper opinion pages.

Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art

June 09, 2018–October 07, 2018

The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

In partnership with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne will present MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art as part of its Winter Masterpieces series. MoMA at NGV will provide a unique survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s iconic collection. Consisting of approximately 200 key works, arranged chronologically into eight thematic sections, the exhibition will trace the development of art and design from late-19th-century urban and industrial transformation, through to the digital and global present.

The emergence of a “new art” at the turn of the 20th century will be represented by some of MoMA’s earliest acquisitions, including masterworks by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne as well as an architectural model by Le Corbusier featured in MoMA’s first architecture exhibition in 1932. Works by pioneering Cubist and Futurist artists, including Pablo Picasso and Umberto Boccioni, will appear alongside the radically abstracted forms present in graphic design, furniture, and textiles from the Bauhaus and in works by artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian. The surreal visual language of paintings by artists like Salvador Dalí and Frida Kahlo and the spontaneity and tactility advanced in works by prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Alexander Calder and Jackson Pollock will also be included.

Developments in art from the 1960s to the 1980s, from Minimalism through Postmodernism, will be explored through the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Sol LeWitt, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring, among others. Significant works of late 20th-century and early 21st century art and design, including major pieces by Kara Walker, Rineke Dijkstra, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson, Huang Yong Ping, Mona Hatoum, El Anatsui and Camille Henrot, will foreground ideas around cultural and national identity, and mobility in a globalized world. Tomohiro Nishikado’s pioneering computer game Space Invaders and Shigetaka Kurita’s original set of 176 emoji will further complement the discussion of contemporary topics.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria.

Organized by Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Juliet Kinchin, Curator of Modern Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Miranda Wallace, Senior Curator, International Exhibition Projects, NGV.

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Young Architects Program 2018: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine

June 28, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

Hide & Seek by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of Arup, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard from June 28 through September 3, 2018. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s construction is a responsive, kinetic environment that features eight intersecting elements arrayed across the entirety of the MoMA PS1 courtyard. Hide & Seek serves as a temporary urban landscape for the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series.

Now in its 19th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues.

Inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city, Hide & Seek enables surprising connections throughout the adjoining courtyards of MoMA PS1 and the surrounding streets. Each of the horizontal structures contains two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors suspended from a frame. The mirrors move in the wind or with human touch, permitting dislocating views and unique spatial relationships across the space that foster unexpected interactions. As the vanishing points disappear into the depths of the mirrors, the illusion of space expands beyond the physical boundaries of the Museum and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside. In reference to these unpredictable gestures, the upper registers of the steel structure are filled with a cloud of mist and light, responding to the activity and life of Warm Up at night. Scriptive elements, including a runway and a large-scale hammock, invite visitors into performance and establish platforms for improvisation.

Warm Up 2018

June 30, 2018–September 01, 2018

 

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up returns in 2018 with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music. Taking place every Saturday from June 30 through September 1, Warm Up celebrates a wide range of artists: emerging and established, local and global, and across genres. This year’s program welcomes Omar-S, SOB x RBE, HoodCelebrityy, Cashmere Cat, Kelsey Lu, Maxo Kream, Lizzo, A-Trak, Gang Gang Dance, Josey Rebelle, Starchild + The New Romantic, and DJ Kass, as well as the New York debut of Laff Trax, a new collaboration by Chaz Bear of Toro y Moi and Jason Chung of Nosaj Thing, and a final-day headlining set by members of Discwoman, a collective that exclusively represents women and genderqueer artists.

Now in its 21st season, Warm Up is one of the longest running music programs housed within a museum. As an integral part of MoMA PS1’s curatorial program, Warm Up seeks to elevate innovative and underrepresented voices and connect fans with music’s most important artists. The program’s alumni include contemporary creators Four Tet, Solange, Black Dice, Cardi B, Jamie XX, and Laurel Halo, as well as legendary DJs including Ritchie Hawtin, DJ Premier, and Total Freedom.

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Rockaway! 2018: Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama

July 01, 2018–September 03, 2018

Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden

This summer, MoMA PS1 will present Yayoi Kusama’s (Japan, b. 1929) site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden (1966–present) as the third iteration of Rockaway!, a free public art festival presented with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Narcissus Garden will be on view from July 1 through September 3, 2018 at the Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden.

Comprised of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres, Narcissus Garden will be on view in a former train garage from the time when Fort Tilden was an active U.S. military base. The mirrored metal surfaces will reflect the industrial surroundings of the now-abandoned building, drawing attention to Fort Tilden’s history as well as the devastating damage inflicted on many buildings in the area by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Rockaway! 2018 is presented by MoMA PS1 with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Modern Matinees: Barry Levinson

July 04, 2018–August 31, 2018

 

Director, screenwriter, producer, and sometime actor Barry Levinson (American, b. 1942) is perhaps best known for the films he set in his beloved Baltimore, a place rich in family, memory, loss, humor, and celebration. The city itself is practically a character in Diner (1982), Tin Men (1987), Avalon (1990), and Liberty Heights (1999). And though Levinson did occasionally move his films away from Baltimore, that depth of feeling has remained constant, as evidenced by his 1988 Best Director Oscar for Rain Man.

A writing veteran of such television variety series as The Marty Feldman Comedy MachineThe Tim Conway Show, and the iconic Carol Burnett Show, Levinson started in movies with the screenplay for Mel Brooks’s sidesplitting Silent Movie (1976). While this comedy background suffuses his work, there is also a poignant nostalgia in Levinson’s films, often set in a time that exists only in memory—and sometimes those memories are faulty. His Baltimore films, especially, speak to long-ago gatherings, when extended families lived under one roof and observed traditions brought with them to this country. They also address the nobility of the working class and a pride in excelling through ambition and an unbreakable work ethic. Levinson confronts bigotry and the concept of otherness in quiet ways, too, as in Liberty Heights or, more overtly, in Rain Man.

In recent years Levinson has returned to TV with a trio of ripped-from-the-headlines biopics for HBO: You Don’t Know Jack (2010), The Wizard of Lies (2017), and Paterno (2018).

This broad overview of Levinson’s distinctive career is drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection. Special thanks to HBO.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Reza Abdoh: Radical Visions

July 14, 2018–July 23, 2018

 

A polymath and self-described member of “a TV generation,” pioneering Iranian-American theater artist Reza Abdoh voraciously incorporated varied references to music videos, variety shows, film, dance, classical texts, BDSM, and more into his work, with equal parts poetry and rigor. Moving images played an essential role in the artist’s large-scale, interdisciplinary productions beginning in the mid-1980s. In his final working years he also turned to the cinematic form; his second feature remained unfinished at the time of his 1995 death from AIDS-related complications. In conjunction with the retrospective Reza Abdoh, currently on view at MoMA PS1, this series offers insight into the artist’s profound creative energy—films he directed and videos created collaboratively for productions—along with a recent documentary and a special evening of conversation.

Across disciplines, Abdoh confronted themes of transgression, violence, and abjection to speak to social and political upheaval and marginalization in America and around the world—with a demanding yet transcendent effect on cast members, audiences, and future scholars and followers of his work. While his media output was largely envisioned in the context of theatrical mise en scène, experiencing Abdoh onscreen is vital to the rediscovery of this essential creator, whose urgent anger, clarity of vision, and unique voice resonate two decades on.

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy, Bidoun; and Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art

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