Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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MoMA Presents: Mahamat- Saleh Haroun’s Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy

September 21, 2017–September 27, 2017

 

On September 21, Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, the writer-director of such award-winning fiction films as AbounaDaratt, and A Screaming Man, returns to MoMA to introduce a weeklong run of his first feature-length documentary, Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy (2016). Presented at the Cannes, Toronto, and New York film festivals, Haroun’s film observes the aftermath of war crimes committed by the brutal dictator Hissein Habré during his eight-year reign (1982–90); his three-year trial for the murder of 40,000 Chadians; and attempts at truth and reconciliation between members of Habré’s police force and the survivors of torture in prison or the families of those who were murdered. Two weeks after the premiere of Haroun’s film at Cannes, Hissein Habré was found guilty by a court in Senegal—the first-ever living African leader to be brought before a court of law, and the first to be convicted for crimes against his own people and against humanity. The power of Haroun’s film lies in its unadorned approach to this harrowing period of Chad’s history, using the quietly damning voices of the victims themselves to make its case. This weeklong run is presented in collaboration with UniFrance.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film.

Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy. 2016. France/Chad. Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun. In French and Arabic; English subtitles. 82 min.

Thursday, September 21, 6:45 p.m., T2. Introduced by Mahamt Saleh Haroun. 
Friday, September 22, 6:30 p.m., T3
Saturday, September 23,  1:30 p.m., T2
Sunday, September 24, 5:30 p.m., T3
Monday, September 25, 4:30 p.m., T2
Tuesday, September 26, 4:00 p.m., T2
Wednesday, September 27, 7:00 p.m., T2

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Max Ernst: Beyond Painting

September 23, 2017–January 01, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany. 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went “beyond painting” to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II. Featuring approximately 100 works drawn from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition includes paintings that challenged material and compositional conventions; collages and overpaintings utilizing found printed reproductions; frottages (rubbings); illustrated books and collage novels; sculptures of painted stone and bronze; and prints made using a range of techniques. Several major, multipart projects represent key moments in Ernst’s long career, ranging from early Dada and Surrealist portfolios of the late 1910s and 1920s to his late masterpiece—a recent acquisition to MoMA’s collection—65 Maximiliana, ou l’exercice illégale de l’astronomie (1964). This illustrated book comprises 34 aquatints complemented by imaginative typographic designs and a secret hieroglyphic script of the artist’s own invention.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Talia Kwartler, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

 

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Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Tuesday, September 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,200 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Marron Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 300 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available in process at moma.org/bourgeoisprints, now documenting over 4,000 printed sheets.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Kenneth C. Griffin Charitable Fund and by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to The Easton Foundation for its long-standing support of the Louise Bourgeois print archive at The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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MoMA Presents: Jang Woo-jin’s Autumn, Autumn

September 29, 2017–October 05, 2017

 

With a surprising structure that recalls the work of both Hong Sang-soo and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, this delicate sophomore feature by Jang Woo-jin is a tale of human connection and searching for one’s place in the world. It begins simply enough, with a young man sitting next to an older couple on a train from Seoul to the city of Chuncheon. From there, we follow the man as he copes with the anxiety of trying to find a job, and then the couple, who, as it turns out, don’t know each other as well as it seems. With funny and moving scenes that play out in understated yet bravura long takes, Autumn, Autumn is as attuned to the passage of time and fluctuations of light as it is to everyday human drama.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Chuncheon, chuncheon (Autumn, Autumn). 2017. South Korea. Directed by Jang Woo-jin. In Korean; English subtitles. 78 min.

Friday, September 29, 7:00 p.m., T2
Saturday, September 30, 4:00 p.m., T2

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Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor

The Museum of Modern Art presents Items: Is Fashion Modern?, an investigation of 111 garments and accessories that have had a profound effect on the world over the last century, on view October 1, 2017, through January 28, 2018. Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition explores fashion thematically, displaying 111 powerful and enduring manifestations of the ways in which fashion—a crucial field of design—touches everyone, everywhere. Like other forms of design, fashion exists within a complex system that involves politics and economics as much as it involves style, technology, and culture. The exhibition examines this complex system using each item as a lens. The 111 typologies are presented in the incarnation that made them significant in the last 100 years (the “stereotype”) alongside contextual materials—images or videos—that trace each item’s history and origins through to its archetypal form. Several concept items (the Little Black Dress, for instance) are represented by more than one example in order to fully underscore the breadth of the concept’s impact, bringing the actual total number of objects in the exhibition to around 350. About 30 items will be complemented by a new prototype—a commissioned or loaned piece inspired by advancements in technology, social dynamics, aesthetics, or political awareness.

The title of the exhibition reprises the question that architect and curator Bernard Rudofsky raised with his 1944 MoMA exhibition Are Clothes Modern?, which is the only other instance of MoMA fully addressing this field of design. In his exhibition, Rudofsky explored individual and collective relationships with mid-century clothing in the waning moments of WWII, when traditional attitudes still prevailed, women still poured their bodies into uncompromising silhouettes, and menswear still demanded superfluous pockets, buttons, cuffs, and collars. For the Items exhibition, Rudofsky’s question provides a springboard (and a foil) from which to consider the ways in which fashion is designed, manufactured, marketed, distributed, worn, and disposed of today.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at medium.com/items. The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at mo.ma/items. It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.
 
Major support is provided by WGSN.
 
Sincere thanks to the members of Friends of Items, a special patron group generously supporting the Museum in celebration of the exhibition.
 
Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
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Black Intimacy

October 03, 2017–October 16, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Black Intimacy explores the ways in which black familial, romantic, and platonic relationships have been portrayed onscreen, with a particular focus on black filmmakers’ attempts at navigating between intimate, personal stories and more broadly political material. Given the legacy of American racial politics, can black love be portrayed onscreen without “making a statement” about race, or is it impossible for the personal to be separated from the political?

Comprising 16 films, two shorts, and a television episode, the series highlights the various ways in which love and relationships are colored by the political, across a wide spectrum of perspectives. Several of the films—Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep, for instance—deal with a particular kind of black male figure and pay close attention to black male identity and struggle; films like Claudine, A Warm December, and The Inkwell portray very different types of black romances and family structures to illustrate a broader scope of love and relationships; the notion of how black women are treated as love interests and how their needs are explored and honored is at the heart of Loosing Ground; and black queer identity, intimacy, and vulnerability are front and center in Looking for Langston and The Watermelon Woman.

Organized by Adeze Wilford, Joint Fellow, Department of Film, MoMA, and The Studio Museum in Harlem.

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Charles White—Leonardo da Vinci. Curated by David Hammons

October 07, 2017–January 01, 2018

 

Charles White (1918–1979) taught drawing in Los Angeles from the mid-1960s until the end of his life, and mentored a generation of students. Among them is David Hammons (American, born 1943), who studied with White early in his career. This exhibition, curated by Hammons, includes White’s monumental work Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)(1973), from The Museum of Modern Art’s collection, and a brush and ink drawing on blue prepared paper by the Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci, lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from the British Royal Collection. Created over 450 years apart, the two works share surprising formal connections and reveal a devotion to drawing by both artists, linking their lasting influence on future generations. Appearing a year prior to the forthcoming MoMA exhibition Charles White: A Retrospective, this project begins the Museum’s consideration of White’s work and his legacy.

Charles White–Leonardo da Vinci. Curated by David Hammons is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is made possible through The Agnes Gund Artist’s Choice Fund endowed by Iara Lee and George Gund III, Lulie and Gordon Gund, Ann and Graham Gund, and Sarah and Geoffrey Gund, generous loan to the Museum by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from the British Royal Collection.

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MoMA and the Fondation Louis Vuitton Announce the Co-Organized Exhibition Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris

October 11, 2017–March 05, 2018

Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, France

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Fondation Louis Vuitton announce the first comprehensive exhibition in France to present MoMA’s unparalleled collection: Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris, on view at Fondation Louis Vuitton from October 11, 2017, through March 5, 2018.

An integrated, cross-disciplinary selection of 200 works, drawn from all six of the Museum’s curatorial departments and reflecting the history of the institution and its collecting, will fill the entirety of the Fondation’s Frank Gehry–designed building. Curated jointly by the two institutions, the display brings together paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, films, media works, performances, and architecture and design objects, tracing the evolution and multifaceted scope of MoMA’s collection. The exhibition was conceived in relation to the architecture and interior spaces of the Fondation Louis Vuitton building, allowing a compelling historical narrative across its four floors.

Etre moderne features masterworks by artists including Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Paul Cézanne, Marcel Duchamp, Walker Evans, Jasper Johns, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Gustav Klimt, Yayoi Kusama, René Magritte, Pablo Picasso, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Yvonne Rainer, Frank Stella, and Paul Signac. A selection of rarely shown documentary material from MoMA’s Archives will be incorporated in the galleries, tracing the history of the Museum and contextualizing the works.

Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris is co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Fondation Louis Vuitton, under the direction of Glenn Lowry (Director, The Museum of Modern Art) and Suzanne Pagé (Artistic Director, Fondation Louis Vuitton). The exhibition is curated by Quentin Bajac (The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, MoMA), assisted by Katerina Stathopoulou (Assistant Curator, MoMA), with Olivier Michelon (Curator, Fondation Louis Vuitton). The archival section is organized by Michelle Elligott (Chief of Archives, MoMA).

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MoMA Presents: Davy Chou’s Diamond Island

October 12, 2017–October 18, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

In this stylish coming-of-age story, an 18-year-old from the Cambodian provinces arrives at Diamond Island luxury housing development outside Phnom Penh to work a construction job transporting scrap between building sites. He makes friends and courts a local girl, but things grow ever more complicated when his long-estranged brother resurfaces. Making his feature-length fiction debut, Davy Chou (whose documentary Golden Slumbers explored the vanished past of Cambodian cinema) creates an intoxicating blend of naturalism and dreamy stylization, rendering the ecstasies and agonies of late youth with remarkable attention to detail.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Diamond Island. 2016. Cambodia/France/Germany/Qatar/Thailand. Directed by Davy Chou. DCP. In Khmer; English subtitles. 101 min.

Thursday, October 12, 7:30 p.m., Theater 1
Friday, October 13, 7:00 p.m. Theater 1
Saturday, October 14, 7:00 p.m., Theater 1
Sunday, October 15, 4:30 p.m., Theater 1
Monday, October 16, 6:30 p.m., Theater 1
Tuesday, October 17, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
Wednesday, October 18, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

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Strange Illusions: Poverty Row Classics Preserved by UCLA

October 19, 2017–October 28, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Long before the Sundance Film Festival, independent productions flourished on Hollywood’s Poverty Row, that strip of Gower Street between Sunset Boulevard and the Paramount lot. Dozens of fly-by-night outfits came and went in the 1930s and ’40s, churning out genre films that often had an edge and grittiness not found in major studio movies. UCLA Film & Television Archive has made it a mission to preserve and restore these rare and endangered works, of which this series presents 12 shining examples, with an emphasis on noir, horror, and pre-Code audacity.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Jan-Christopher Horak, Todd Weiner, and Scott MacQueen of UCLA Film & Television Archive.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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