Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980

July 15, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, July 10, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the architecture of the former Yugoslavia with Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, the first major US exhibition to study the remarkable body of work that sparked international interest during the 45 years of the country’s existence. The exhibition will include more than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region, introducing the exceptional built work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience for the first time.

The architecture that emerged during this period—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist “social condensers”—is a manifestation of the radical pluralism, hybridity, and idealism that characterized the Yugoslav state itself. Exploring themes of large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture, Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature work by important architects, including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić. From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition will examine the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character.

Organized by Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and Vladimir Kulić, Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University, with Anna Kats, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

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A View from the Vaults: Recent Film Acquisitions

July 18, 2018–August 08, 2018

 

The Museum of Modern Art’s film collection now comprises more than 30,000 film titles. And with the 1996 opening of the Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Center in Hamlin, Pennsylvania, the Museum has a state-of-the-art facility where these moving-image treasures can be stored. This two-building complex, now operating for more than 20 years, gives us ample space and the ideal controlled environment in which to preserve materials essential to film history, and provides our staff with the ability to plan confidently for the acquisition, cataloging, and care of future films.

Comprised of recent additions, this series illustrates the collection’s enormous diversity, from classic and contemporary Hollywood feature productions (GiantButch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Amadeus), to independent works that explore social issues (Into the Abyss), to international films that portray cultural values not unlike our own (Waiting for HappinessSalaam Bombay!). We included a few just-plain-funny movies, too.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Constantin Brancusi Sculpture

July 22, 2018–February 18, 2019

Floor Two, Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Looking back at the first showing of Constantin Brancusi’s work (1876–1957) in the United States, in the 1913 Armory Show, one writer reflected that sculptures on view were “disturbing, so disturbing indeed that they completely altered the attitude of a great many New Yorkers towards a whole branch of art.” Indeed, Brancusi’s beguilingly simple forms looked like nothing else, then or since.

Rather than modeling clay like his peers, Brancusi carved his work directly from wood or stone, or cast it in bronze. Simultaneously, he rejected realism, preferring that his sculptures evoke rather than resemble the subjects named in their titles. Brancusi made bases for many of his sculptures, themselves complex constructions that became part of the work. He often moved works from base to base, or placed them directly on the floor of his studio, so that they lived in the world alongside ordinary objects, and among people.

Born in rural Romania, Brancusi moved to Paris in 1904, where he established his studio and quickly immersed himself in avant-garde art circles. In his adopted city, he embraced an experimental modern spirit, including an interest in modern machines and popular culture. With his friend Man Ray, he made films that captured his life in the studio—working with his materials and muses, activating his artworks through movement and recombination, and revealing his sources of inspiration such as animals at play, light in nature, and dance. Yet until his death he proudly presented himself as an outsider—cultivating his image as a peasant, with a long beard, work shirt, and sandals. The contradiction also informs his art making, which was dependent on ancient techniques as much as contemporary technologies.

This exhibition celebrates MoMA’s extraordinary holdings—11 sculptures by Brancusi will be shown together for the first time, alongside drawings, photographs, and films. A selection of never-before-seen archival materials shed light on the artist’s working process and relationships with friends, sitters, and patrons, including this Museum. What emerges is a rich portrait of an artist whose risk-taking and inventive approach to form changed the course of the art that followed.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture

The exhibition is made possible by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Major support is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by Jack Shear with The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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The Future of Film Is Female

July 26, 2018–August 02, 2018

 

The current moment in the film industry is one of deep change and extraordinary opportunity, and we are presented with the responsibility to take the necessary steps toward a brighter, more inclusive future in which cinema can more accurately reflect the world around us. The Future of Film is Female is a proactive, positive gesture toward increased representation, equitable workplaces, and gender parity for women in cinema through the simple, yet powerful, act of screening their films.

Begun as a funding program for women developing short films, The Future of Film Is Female has expanded its mission, partnering with MoMA to champion contemporary films directed by women early in their careers, in an effort to have their voices represented and respected on equal footing with their male counterparts. This two-year, seasonal series begins with films by Shirin Neshat, Gillian Robespierre, Maysaloun Hamoud, Coralie Fargeat, and Erin Lee Carr; a special shorts program from the NoBudge movie club; and short film screenings before each feature. Subsequent seasons will reflect and respond to changes in filmmaking, financing, and exhibition, in addition to broader societal challenges.

The Future of Film Is Female is organized by Caryn Coleman, guest curator, and Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is supported by The Museum of Modern Art’s Annual Film Fund.

 

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Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures, Part 2

August 09, 2018–August 23, 2018

 

Continuing our celebration of the Republic Pictures library, which is currently being restored and returned to wide distribution by Paramount, here are 16 more rarely seen titles, each handpicked by Martin Scorsese. The program opens with a rare Republic A-picture, Edward Ludwig’s dreamlike South Seas romance Wake of the Red Witch(1948), with John Wayne and Gail Russell, and includes Republic’s 1953 Trucolor follow-up, Fair Wind to Java(Joseph Kane, 1953)—a Scorsese favorite starring Fred McMurray and Vera Ralston, in a 35mm restoration from The Film Foundation.

Other filmmakers to be highlighted include John H. Auer (I, Jane Doe, 1948), William A. Seiter (Make Haste to Live, 1954), William Witney (The Outcast, 1954), Bernard Vorhaus (Three Faces West, 1940), Anthony Mann (Strangers in the Night, 1944), Herbert Wilcox (Laughing Anne, 1953), Allan Dwan (Surrender, 1950), and Frank Borzage (Moonrise, 1948). This series is presented in association with The Film Foundation and Paramount Pictures.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

 

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MoMA Presents: Michelle Memran’s The Rest I Make Up

August 23, 2018–August 29, 2018

 

Maria Irene Fornes is one of America’s greatest playwrights and most influential teachers, but many only know her as the ex-lover of writer and social critic Susan Sontag. The visionary Cuban-American dramatist constructed astonishing worlds onstage and taught countless students how to connect with their imaginations. When she gradually stops writing due to dementia, an unexpected friendship with filmmaker Michelle Memran reignites her spontaneous creative spirit and triggers a decade-long collaboration that picks up where the pen left off. 

The duo travels from New York to Havana, Miami to Seattle, exploring the playwright’s remembered past and their shared present. Theater luminaries such as Edward Albee, Ellen Stewart, Lanford Wilson, and others weigh in on Fornes’s important contributions. What began as an accidental collaboration becomes a story of love, creativity, and connection that persists even in the face of forgetting.

The Rest I Make Up. 2018. USA. Directed by Michelle Memran. 75 min.

Thursday, August 237:00 p.m., Theater 2
Friday, August 244:30 p.m., Theater 2
Saturday, August 257:00 p.m., Theater 2
Sunday, August 261:30 p.m., Theater 2
Monday, August 274:30 p.m., Theater 2
Tuesday, August 28, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
Wednesday, August 294:30 p.m., Theater 2
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MoMA Presents: Emmanuel Gras’s Makala

August 24, 2018–August 30, 2018

 

Gras’s transfixing road movie and Cannes Film Festival prizewinner follows a young Congolese man named Kabwita through the making, transporting, and selling of charcoal—from the felling of a tree to pushing a teetering bicycle weighed down with bulging sacks along treacherous dirt roads to contending with motorists, extortionists, and potential customers. As Gras observes Kabwita’s perilous trade, he derives beauty from the monumental efforts that go into his day-to-day existence. Makala is a documentary that resembles a neorealist parable, locating an epic dimension in the humblest of existences. A Kino Lorber release.

Makala. 2017. France. Directed by Emmanuel Gras. In French, Swahili; English subtitles. 96 min.

Friday, August 247:00 p.m., Theater 2
Saturday, August 254:00 p.m., Theater 2
Sunday, August 264:00 p.m., Theater 2
Monday, August 277:00 p.m., Theater 2
Tuesday, August 284:30 p.m., Theater 2
Wednesday, August 297:00 p.m., Theater 2
Thursday, August 307:00 p.m., Theater 2
 
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Jacques Audiard

August 31, 2018–September 12, 2018

 

For audiences who live and breathe film, the cinematic atmosphere created by writer-director Jacques Audiard is among the most intoxicating and sustaining. Since the mid 1990s, he has immersed us in the deeply nuanced worlds of his intricately drawn characters, providing actors like Emmanuelle Devos, Romain Duris, and Tahar Rahim with career-defining roles in the process. A dedicated cinephile, Audiard plays with genre conventions, from crime-thriller to romance to Western, and infuses them with new vitality. On the occasion of his first English-language feature, The Sisters Brothers, we are excited to provide this look back on his remarkable accomplishments at mid-career.

Organized by Sean Egan, Senior Producer, with Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

 
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MoMA Presents: Ingmar Bergman’s This Can’t Happen Here

September 05, 2018–September 11, 2018

 

A young Ingmar Bergman’s stab at the Cold War spy thriller, This Can’t Happen Here (aka High Tension) has been virtually unseen for more than a half century. The film’s darkling atmosphere of espionage, and its on-location photography throughout Stockholm by the great Gunnar Fischer, makes it both a fascinating outlier in the filmmaker’s career and a strangely alluring collision of noir, propaganda, satire, and slapstick.

Throughout his life, Bergman dismissed This Can’t Happen Here as a naïve attempt at anti-communist allegory—he realized four days into shooting that the “lives and experiences” of the exiled Baltic actors playing the film’s refugees were far richer in cinematic possibility than the “unevenly developed intrigue” of the plot—and he refused to let it be included in retrospectives. Today, on the centenary of the filmmaker’s birth, we can judge This Can’t Happen Here for ourselves: Thanks to Svenska Filmindustri and the Bergman family, MoMA presents an exclusive theatrical run of the Swedish Film Institute’s new digital restoration.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Sänt hander inte här (This Can’t Happen Here/High Tension). 1950. Sweden. Directed by Ingmar Bergman. Screenplay by Herbert Grevenius. With Signe Hasso, Alf Kjellin, Ulf Palme. In Swedish; English subtitles. 85 min.
 
Wednesday, September 56:30 p.m., Theater 2
Thursday, September 67:00 p.m., Theater 2
Friday, September 77:00 p.m., Theater 2
Saturday, September 8, 4:00 p.m., Theater 2
Sunday, September 94:00 p.m., Theater 2
Monday, September 104:00 p.m., Theater 1
Tuesday, September 117:00 p.m., Theater 1
 
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Modern Matinees: Vincent Price

September 05, 2018–October 31, 2018

 

Before he became synonymous with the ghoulish and macabre, channeling Edgar Allan Poe and sundry possessed madmen, Vincent Price (American, 1911–1993) graduated from Yale University with an art history degree. While in London to continue his studies, Price was drawn to the stage, and by 1935 he was a member of Orson Welles’s Mercury Theatre. With his distinctive voice—part effete, part diabolical—and imposing 6’4″ frame, Price was truly a rarity compared to the typical Hollywood lead. His earliest film roles consisted of character parts in costume dramas, and it wasn’t until 1940, when he appeared in The House of the Seven Gables, that Price’s predilection for Gothic narratives was revealed.

After a string of high-profile roles in Brigham Young (1940), Laura (1944), and The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), Price became a true lead, and his versatility—cad, romantic, adventurer, villain—was reflected by the diversity of the films he appeared in (all while remaining quite attached to 20th Century Fox). In 1946, in a review of Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s DragonwyckThe New York Times presciently encapsulated Price’s appeal by referring to his performance as an example of “suave diabolism.”

Price cleverly continued to mix up the roles he choose, from a Southwestern land boss in The Baron of Arizona (1950) to Omar Khayyam in Son of Sinbad (1955) to the ringmaster in The Big Circus (1959), but a string of low-budget horror films would come to define his legacy—beginning with 1958’s The Fly and reaching a crescendo in his Poe-inspired collaborations with Roger Corman, including House of Usher(1960), The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), and The Masque of the Red Death (1964). Price’s mischievous raised eyebrows and devilish vocal modulations made him perfect for these roles, and he relished his eccentric performances. Toward the end of his career, Price’s reputation was cemented with a younger generation when he provided the iconic voice-over soliloquy for Michael Jackson’s hit “Thriller,” and later worked with Tim Burton on Edward Scissorhands (1990), his final live-action film appearance.

This wide-ranging look at the career of Vincent Price is drawn mainly from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

 
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