Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection

March 19, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 14, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Unfinished Conversations brings together works by more than a dozen artists, made in the past decade and recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art. The artists that make up this intergenerational selection address current anxiety and unrest around the world and offer critical reflections on the present moment.

The exhibition considers the intertwining themes of social protest, the effect of history on the formation of identity, and how art juxtaposes fact and fiction. From Cairo to St. Petersburg, from The Hague to Recife, the artists in the exhibition observe and interpret acts of state violence and the resistance and activism they provoke. They reexamine historical moments, evoking images of the past and claiming their places within it. They take on contemporary struggles for power, intervening into debates about government surveillance and labor exploitation. Together, these artists look back to traditions both within and beyond the visual arts to imagine possibilities for an uncertain future.

The title of the exhibition is inspired by John Akomfrah’s three-channel video installation The Unfinished Conversation (2012), which chronicles the life and work of the Jamaican-born British cultural theorist Stuart Hall (1932–2014). Hall recognized the power that museum collections have to both shape and reflect culture and communities, contending that they are sources of inspiration “which create thought-provoking visions of our past. They provide testimony to the darkest and brightest of human history.”

Unfinished Conversations includes works by John Akomfrah, Jonathas de Andrade, Anna Boghiguian, Andrea Bowers, Paul Chan, Simon Denny, Samuel Fosso, Iman Issa, Erik van Lieshout, Cameron Rowland, Wolfgang Tillmans, Adrián Villar Rojas, Kara Walker, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art and Director MoMA PS1; Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, with Elizabeth Henderson, Department Coordinator, Office of the Chief Curator at Large. 

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Additional support for Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Share

.com/.cn

March 21, 2017–April 30, 2017

K11 Art Foundation Pop-up Space, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

The K11 Art Foundation (KAF) and MoMA PS1 co-present .com/.cn, the first project jointly presented by the two institutions as part of an ongoing research partnership. Co-curated by Klaus Biesenbach and Peter Eleey of MoMA PS1 in New York, com/.cn includes work by Darren Bader, Cao Fei, DIS, Aleksandra Domanovic, Greg Edwards, Li Ming, Liang Wei, Lin Ke, Liu Shiyuan, Miao Ying, Laura Owens, Oliver Payne, Sondra Perry, Wang Xin, and Anicka Yi.

.com/.cn showcases artistic practices in China and the West that respond to, or are affected by, our digital ecosystem. Frequently described as a “network” or a “cloud,” this system is often assumed to be universal, unencumbered by territory, language, law, or national culture. However, distinct regional internets have developed under varying forms of state control, each conditioning different social behaviors, economies, and modes of thought. These variations are particularly evident in comparing artistic responses to the available internets of China and the West, and their respective political and economic systems.

Share
Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid March 25, 2017–April 02, 2017

Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid

March 29, 2017–April 02, 2017

Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

The starting point for Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid is a simple question: Can choreography be performed in the form of an exhibition? To answer that question, one of today’s most important dancer/choreographers reimagined her stage performance Vortex Temporum (2013)—choreographed to the eponymous work by the late French composer Gérard Grisey—for a museum space, away from a conventional theater setting.

Work/Travail/Arbeid is not De Keersmaeker’s first project to be performed in the museum space; in 2011 she performed the solo Violin Phase, part of her very first piece Fase: Four Movements to the Music of Steve Reich (1982), in MoMA’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium. But with Work/Travail/Arbeid the artist imagines the choreography in relation to the practices and protocols of an exhibition. The dancers from De Keersmaeker’s company, Rosas, and the musicians, from the Ictus ensemble, are not simply bringing dance into a museum; they are reinterpreting dance in the space of MoMA’s Marron Atrium in the form of a five-day exhibition, accessible continuously to the audience during public hours. The original hour-long piece has been expanded to a nine-hour cycle, with each hour offering different choreography and combinations of seven dancers and seven musicians. (Vortex Temporum is originally a sextet for piano, flute, clarinet, violin, viola, and cello.) Throughout her career De Keersmaeker has focused on the relationship between music and dance: rather than allow the dance to simply illustrate the music, De Keersmaeker uses music as a defining structure. The relation to music in Vortex Temporum, for example, influenced how she reconceived it for the exhibition. Time and harmonic space are expanded and condensed, creating the vortexes of time suggested by the work’s title.

Work/Travail/Arbeid is an itinerant exhibition, first staged at WIELS in Brussels over nine weeks in 2015; then at Centre Pompidou over nine days in a large square space with glass walls, which invited the city itself into the work; and then moving to Tate Modern in London, in the long rectangular space of the Turbine Hall. Each space presented different challenges of adaptation and reconceptualization, a dynamic that continues with the version being re-choreographed and re-created for the unique dimensions of MoMA’s Marron Atrium.

In each of those cases the result is a project that transforms the very material conditions that have long been essential to dance—and in particular the rigorous structure and choreographic language for which De Keersmaeker is known—into an entirely new form of exhibition. The expanded duration of Work/Travail/Arbeid reveals new insights into the complex conceptual, technical, and physical labor that is essential to the practice of dance.

Organized by Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art; produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and by The General Delegation of the Government of Flanders to the USA.

Piano provided by Steinway & Sons.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with Rosas, Ictus, and WIELS Contemporary Art Centre.

Share
Un caballo llamado Elefante (Elephant, the Horse). 2016. Chile/Mexico/Columbia. Directed by Andrés Waissbluth. Courtesy of Ibermedia

Latin American Cinema: The State of the Art

March 30, 2017–April 09, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Latin American Cinema: The State of the Art highlights exciting new voices in film from countries such as Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Perú, and Venezuela from March 30 through April 9 in The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters. The seven-film series includes works that illuminate young adult life in Latin America, including Rara (2016) and Alba (2016). Several screenings will feature post-screening discussions with filmmakers, including both Rara and Alba, the opening night film, Magallanes (2015), and Un caballo llamado Elefante (2016).

The series showcases films created with the support of Ibermedia—the intergovernmental organization which, for two decades, has advanced the making of fiction and nonfiction films in Latin America, Portugal, Spain, and, most recently, Italy. By supporting projects in various stages of the filmmaking process, from development and production to distribution, exhibition, and promotion, Ibermedia has been instrumental in elevating artistically significant works and nurturing emerging voices in cinema. Filmmakers who have been supported by Ibermedia include Manoel de Oliveira, Lucrecia Martel, and Miguel Gomes.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

Share
Notorious. 1946. USA. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Modern Matinees: Mr. Cary Grant

April 05, 2017–May 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Cary Grant (American, b. Great Britain, 1904–1986) has always been described as a versatile actor. He possessed a keen wit and comic timing that made him a natural with the rapid banter of screwball comedies, and his charm and elegant good looks propelled him into the rarified company of cinema’s great leading men. From the start of his film career, in 1932, to its conclusion, in 1966, Grant worked with a who’s-who of iconic directors—from George Cukor to Alfred Hitchcock—on everything from outrageous physical comedies to intense dramas and thrillers.

The Bristol, England–born Archibald Leach was spellbound by vaudeville, and joined an acrobatic act called The Penders as a stilt walker. In 1920, Leach arrived in New York, where The Penders performed at the Hippodrome, and he remained in the States for several years. An uninspiring screen test at Paramount Pictures in 1931 nonetheless garnered him a contract—and a demand by studio head B. P. Schulberg that he change his name. Thus Cary Grant was born.

Elegant, mischievous, good-humored, masculine, cheeky, and sensual but never overbearing or pompous, Grant’s greatest gift was his peerless versatility. This series demonstrates that range with highlights from Grant’s three decades in American cinema, drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection. All films are from the US and star Cary Grant.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Share

Maureen Gallace

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

The first survey of paintings by American artist Maureen Gallace, Clear Day features nearly 70 works spanning the artist’s career. For more than 25 years, Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has painted genre scenes drawn from the American landscape and still life traditions. Her small canvases and panels most commonly depict rural pastorals and coastlines, typically featuring nondescript barns or cottages amid dunes and foliage that evoke a nostalgic New England. Recalling holiday cards and vacation snapshots, Gallace’s paintings quietly disturb the reassuring sentimentality of such pictures. Often lacking doors or windows, her houses may seem locked up, or disquietingly open and vulnerable to the elements. Her lush gardens and yards can be obstructed by fences, and paths lead the viewer astray; infinite vistas over the ocean are stacked and collapsed into shallow compositions. From the outset of her career, Gallace has deployed a range of abstract compositional tools to frustrate the romantic enticements of her subject matter and the painterly seductions of her surfaces, giving rise to a quietly remarkable and contemporary body of work.

Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at Maureen Paley, London (2016); 303 Gallery, New York (2015); La Conservera, Murcia, Spain (2011); The Art Institute of Chicago (2006); Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2004); Dallas Museum of Art (2003); and Museum Schloss-Hardenberg, Velbert, Germany (1996). Group shows in which she has participated include September 11, MoMA PS1 (2011) and the Whitney Biennial (2010).

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

Share
Ian Cheng

Ian Cheng: EMISSARIES

April 9–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. museum solo exhibition for Ian Cheng, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015–17), a series of live simulation works created using a video game engine. Described by the artist as “a video game that plays itself,” the works are comprised of computer-generated simulations like those used in predictive technologies for complex scenarios such as climate change or elections. Populated by a cast of characters and wildlife that interact, intervene, and recombine in open-ended narratives, Cheng’s simulations evolve endlessly as self-contained ecosystems. The exhibition EMISSARIES marks the completion of this series of works, which contemplate timeless questions about evolution, the origins of human consciousness, and ways of relating to a chaotic existence. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is on display for the first time at MoMA PS1.

EMISSARIES is presented as a large-scale installation that transforms the gallery into a portal-like environment for Cheng’s simulations to build, generate, regress, and progress.  The 10-foot-tall projections allow each simulation to unfold at life-size, positioning viewers as observers who can follow the lives of specific characters as they interact within the simulated worlds and each other in an ever-changing environment.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

Share

Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms, an exhibition featuring the work of the Slovakian artist and documentary filmmaker. Since 2009, Rafa (b. Žilina, 1979) has employed the methods of cinéma verité to document what he refers to as “new nationalisms” across Central Europe, creating vivid and stirring portraits of the resurgence of extreme right-wing, xenophobic, and neo-fascist groups in the region.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; and Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

Share

Past Skin

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

In today’s technological environment, we can style, extend, and broadcast ourselves at will, projecting into digital realms that in turn shape us. The six artists in Past Skin take up science historian and cyber-feminist Donna Haraway’s provocation, “Why should our body end at the skin?,” testing the growing porosity between our bodies and habitats in a contemporary world where virtuality is ubiquitous and surreality is increasingly normalized. As much as we exert influence on our bodies and surroundings, the technologies that enable this influence also influence us. No longer simply “users” of technology, we become players renegotiating the stakes of our world, engineering natural and synthetic environments to fulfill social imperatives and emotional needs. Featuring 20 works across a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, drawing, sound, video, and virtual reality—by artists Cui Jie, Jordan Kasey, Hannah Levy, Abigail Lucien, Jillian Mayer, MSHR, and Madelon Vriesendorp, Past Skin highlights works that merge figures with landscapes to examine the state of the contemporary body in and beyond nature.

Past Skin is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

 

Share

A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976–2000

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976-2000, a selection of archival materials documenting the vast array of artists who worked and exhibited in the museum’s building over the course of its first 25 years. Surveying a period that spans from the institution’s inaugural 1976 exhibition Rooms to its merger with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000, the exhibition brings together hundreds of objects drawn from the MoMA PS1 Archives, including artist’s proposals, exhibition posters, photographs, correspondence, flyers, postcards, residency applications, and other ephemera.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1; and Jonathan Lill, Leon Levy Foundation Project Manager, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

Share