Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

Stanya Kahn: Stand in the Stream

July 08, 2017–September 04, 2017

MoMA PS1

In Stand in the Stream, Stanya Kahn weaves together deeply personal and emphatically political imagery into a meditation on intimacy, alienation, and resistance. Both a work of mourning and a call to action, the film is also a documentary portrait of four generations of Kahn’s family: her grandmother, her mother, her son, and herself. MoMA PS1’s exhibition is the New York premiere and first museum presentation of this work.

Built from footage Kahn shot primarily over the past six years, Stand in the Stream records the artist in the act of both living and seeing, culminating in her activist mother’s decline into dementia and eventual death in 2015, and in events leading up to and surrounding the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. In a rhythmic flow of images, punctuated by irruptions of protest, solidarity, and violence, Kahn’s film charts the intersection between private and public life in today’s America.

The film’s title refers both to the stream of digital images and to Bertolt Brecht’s play, Man Equals Man, which deals with the ways in which human beings are instrumentalized in the manner of machines. As Kahn connects to random strangers in internet chatrooms while wearing Halloween monster masks, or voyeuristically records anonymous riders on the subway, she plays with distinctions between the intimacy of family and the estrangement of contemporary life.

The film’s sound design includes original compositions by Kahn and by musician/composer Alexia Riner. All footage is shot live or livestream screen-recorded in real time.

This presentation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

Share

Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction

July 17, 2017–August 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction, presented at The Museum of Modern Art from July 17 through August 31, will screen 70 science-fiction films from all over the world—22 countries including the United States, the Soviet Union, China, India, Cameroon, Mexico and beyond—that explore the question: What does it mean to be human? In a departure from other exhibitions of science-fiction cinema, Future Imperfect moves beyond space travel, visions of the distant future, alien invasions and monsters. Instead, all 70 films take place on Earth in the present (or near present), questioning our humanity in all its miraculous, uncanny, and perhaps unknowable aspects.

Since the dawn of cinema, filmmakers as diverse as Kathryn Bigelow, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Kinji Fukasaku, Jean-Luc Godard, Barry Jenkins, Georges Méliès, Michael Snow, Alexander Sokurov, and Steven Spielberg have explored ideas of memory and consciousness; thought, sensation, and desire; self and other; nature and nurture; time and space; and love and death. Their films, lying at the nexus of art, philosophy and science, occupy a twilight zone bounded only by the imagination, where “humanness” remains an enchanting enigma.

Future Imperfect is organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

Share

Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), consists of an evolving cast of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these events were part of “an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” Recitals, which Adkins orchestrated with the Corps through collective improvisation, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as abolitionist John Brown, musician John Coltrane, explorer Matthew Henson, and singer Bessie Smith.

Projects 107 is the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. In addition to a selection of Adkins’s sculptures, performance props and paraphernalia, and documentary videos of recitals, Projects 107 features a series of live performances by the Corps. The performance program brings together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians in the Lone Wolf Recital Corps: Sanford Biggers, Juini Booth, Blanche Bruce, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Dick Griffin, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Cavassa Nickens, Demetrius Oliver, Clifford Owens, Kamau Amu Patton, Marshall Sealy, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, and Kiane Zawadi; and others, including Da’Niro Elle Brown, Zachary Fabri, LaMont Hamilton, Jason Moran, and Kambui Olujimi.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Share

3-D Funhouse: Recent Restorations from the 3-D Film Archive

September 01, 2017–September 07, 2017

 

3-D Funhouse is a weeklong tribute to the enterprising 3-D Film Archive, whose curators have dedicated themselves to collecting, restoring, and presenting in digital form the stereoscopic films of the analog era. It takes a lot of dedication and detective work to reassemble these wonders of midcentury technology, many of which were discarded by their producers once the 1950s 3-D fad had passed. Presented here are four newly restored features, ranging from the studio musical Those Redheads from Seattle (1953) to the feisty independent science-fiction film Gog (1954), as well as a program of rare 3-D shorts.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

Share

Modern Matinees: Directed by John Cassavetes

September 01, 2017–October 27, 2017

 

The name John Cassavetes is usually at the top of any list of American independent filmmakers. He raised his own production funds and wrote, directed, and often starred in the features he made, alongside a stalwart group of loyal actors. Steadfastly working outside the Hollywood studio system, Cassavetes (1929–1989) endeavored to bring truly authentic narratives to the screen, regularly focusing on stories about marriage, male friendship, family dynamics, and reconciliation. The subject matter was raw, deeply affecting audiences who saw much of their own lives reflected onscreen.

Cassavetes began his career as an actor in the nascent days of television. By the time he began work on his first feature film, Shadows, in 1959, he had already helmed episodes of Alfred Hitchcock PresentsThe Philco-Goodyear Playhouse, and Playhouse 90. This immersion in television production as both a director and actor provided both the money needed to finance his own films and valuable experience working nimbly with a small budget, limited equipment, and a like-minded cast. According to Shadows producer Seymour Cassel, the film was shot so economically that the 16mm camera equipment was borrowed from fellow New York filmmaker Shirley Clarke. While some of Shadows was improvisational, much was fully scripted by the time the film was shot—including scenes filmed right here in The Museum of Modern Art.

Though each film was an uphill battle, Cassavetes persevered while remaining truly independent. His outsider films were commended by critics, embraced by audiences, and even managed to garner major industry awards. Cassavetes was nominated for two Oscars—for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay—and received awards from the Venice Film Festival and the National Society of Film Critics.

John Cassavetes Directs includes 10 feature films and a short, all drawn from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Share

MoMA Presents: Deepak Rauniyar’s White Sun

September 06, 2017–September 12, 2017

 

The second feature by Nepalese filmmaker Deepak Rauniyar sensitively explores the damage done to the fabric of Nepalese society by the decade-long civil war between the Maoists and Nepal’s monarchical government. On the occasion of his father’s funeral, Chandra returns to the village he left years earlier to join the Maoists, and finds himself united with the daughter he never met and revisiting uneasy relations with family members and neighbors. Past traumas return and cause tensions to boil over. Finding the political within the everyday, White Sun uses one village’s complex tribulations to speak to an entire national history.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Seto Surya (White Sun). 2016. Nepal/USA/Qatar/Netherlands. Directed by Deepak Rauniyar. In Nepali; English subtitles. 89 min.

Wednesday, September 6, 7:30 p.m., T2
Thursday, September 7, 4:30 p.m., T1
Friday, September 8, 7:30 p.m., T2
Saturday, September 9, 4:30 p.m., T2
Sunday, September 10, 1:30 p.m., T2
Monday, September 11, 7:30 p.m., T2
Tuesday, September 12, 4:30 p.m., T2

Share

Kelly Reichardt: Powerfully Observant

September 12, 2017–September 25, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Kelly Reichardt is a true American auteur; you know her films when you see them. Her camera focuses on a landscape and remains, still and patient, until the most minor action occurs—and then she holds for a moment more, an audaciously minimalist style that challenges the audience to focus on light, shadow, or the merest sound. Reichardt’s films have always been preoccupied with the ordinary, tricky messes characters cook up in their daily lives, and her characters are conflicted, exhausted, inhabiting unremarkable worlds laden with broken promises. But when they do break out, like the miserable Florida housewife in River of Grass—beware!

From the unconventional buddy movie Old Joy, to the parched, harrowing wagon train journey of Meek’s Cutoff, to the trio of small-town stories in last year’s Certain Women, Reichardt plumbs human memory, survival, self-reliance, and loneliness. Another unconventional buddy movie, Wendy and Lucy, reflects the economic downturn of 2008 through a taciturn, pragmatic woman who packs up her car and her dog to find work in Alaska.

This mid-career retrospective includes the six feature films Reichardt has made since 1994—a seemingly modest filmography for more than 20 years of work. But these intricately produced and fiercely independent are well worth the wait. As Catherine Wheatley wrote of the characters in Certain Women, “They know to keep their counsel, these women: know the importance of restraint, silence, of knowing when to speak and when to act and when to stay still.” These same qualities characterize the graceful, intensely perceptive films of Kelly Reichardt.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film. Thanks to Dan Berger of Oscilloscope Films and Brittany Shaw.

Share

MoMA Presents: Mahamat- Saleh Haroun’s Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy

September 21, 2017–September 27, 2017

 

On September 21, Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, the writer-director of such award-winning fiction films as AbounaDaratt, and A Screaming Man, returns to MoMA to introduce a weeklong run of his first feature-length documentary, Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy (2016). Presented at the Cannes, Toronto, and New York film festivals, Haroun’s film observes the aftermath of war crimes committed by the brutal dictator Hissein Habré during his eight-year reign (1982–90); his three-year trial for the murder of 40,000 Chadians; and attempts at truth and reconciliation between members of Habré’s police force and the survivors of torture in prison or the families of those who were murdered. Two weeks after the premiere of Haroun’s film at Cannes, Hissein Habré was found guilty by a court in Senegal—the first-ever living African leader to be brought before a court of law, and the first to be convicted for crimes against his own people and against humanity. The power of Haroun’s film lies in its unadorned approach to this harrowing period of Chad’s history, using the quietly damning voices of the victims themselves to make its case. This weeklong run is presented in collaboration with UniFrance.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film.

Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy. 2016. France/Chad. Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun. In French and Arabic; English subtitles. 82 min.

Thursday, September 21, 6:45 p.m., T2. Introduced by Mahamt Saleh Haroun. 
Friday, September 22, 6:30 p.m., T3
Saturday, September 23,  1:30 p.m., T2
Sunday, September 24, 5:30 p.m., T3
Monday, September 25, 4:30 p.m., T2
Tuesday, September 26, 4:00 p.m., T2
Wednesday, September 27, 7:00 p.m., T2

Share

Max Ernst: Beyond Painting

September 23, 2017–January 01, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany. 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went “beyond painting” to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II. Featuring approximately 100 works drawn from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition includes paintings that challenged material and compositional conventions; collages and overpaintings utilizing found printed reproductions; frottages (rubbings); illustrated books and collage novels; sculptures of painted stone and bronze; and prints made using a range of techniques. Several major, multipart projects represent key moments in Ernst’s long career, ranging from early Dada and Surrealist portfolios of the late 1910s and 1920s to his late masterpiece—a recent acquisition to MoMA’s collection—65 Maximiliana, ou l’exercice illégale de l’astronomie (1964). This illustrated book comprises 34 aquatints complemented by imaginative typographic designs and a secret hieroglyphic script of the artist’s own invention.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Talia Kwartler, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

 

Share

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,200 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Marron Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 300 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available in process at moma.org/bourgeoisprints, now documenting over 4,000 printed sheets.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to The Easton Foundation for its long-standing support of the Louise Bourgeois print archive at The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

 

 

Share