Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

Julianne Moore: A Tribute

November 02, 2017–November 12, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Department of Film is thrilled to celebrate honoree Julianne Moore at MoMA’s 10th annual Film Benefit. Since her 1993 breakthrough in Robert Altman’s Short Cuts, Moore has made a career of portraying complex and often unraveling women, turning even her most ordinary scenes into transfixing character studies. At home in both Hollywood blockbusters and art house hits, her vulnerability on screen is singular.

Presented in conjunction with the Film Benefit, this small selection of films—including two from MoMA’s collection (The Kids Are All Right and Far from Heaven) along with masterworks like Safe and Magnolia—captures an actor in top form, exploring remarkable emotional depths.

Organized by Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film.

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The Contenders 2017

November 09, 2017–January 12, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art announces its selection of the boldest films of 2017 for the 10th year of The Contenders—and the fourth year of MoMA’s bicoastal collaboration with the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles—running November 9, 2017, through January 12, 2018. MoMA’s annual end-of-year series offers audiences the unique opportunity to peer behind the industry curtain, with special presentations that often feature revealing post-screening conversations with filmmakers and actors. Tickets for the MoMA screenings go on sale two weeks prior to each screening at 9:30 a.m. at The Museum of Modern Art and online at moma.org.

Opening the series at the Museum on November 9 is Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, featuring a post-screening tribute to actor Sam Rockwell, followed by a post-screening conversation with McDonagh and actor Sam Rockwell. This darkly comic drama also stars Oscar-winner Frances McDormand as Mildred Hayes, who commissions three controversial billboards aimed at local law enforcement (Rockwell and Woody Harrelson) after her daughter’s murder case remains unsolved for months.

Organized by the Department of Film.

The presentation is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

Media sponsorship is provided by Variety.

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The Long Run

November 11, 2017–November 04, 2018

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes what follows.  “The Long Run” provides an alternate view: by chronicling the continued experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking, persistent observation, and countless hours in the studio.  Each work in this presentation exemplifies an artist’s distinct evolution.  For some, this results from continually testing the boundaries of a given medium, for others it reflects the pressures of social, economic, and political circumstances.  Often, it is a combination of both.  “The Long Run” includes monographic galleries and rooms that bring together artists broad ranging in background and approach, drawn from MoMA’s collection.  All the artists in this presentation are united by a ceaseless desire to make meaningful work, year after year, across decades.   They include Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Joan Jonas, Helen Levitt, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, Frank Stella, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents the most comprehensive exhibition ever organized of photographer Stephen Shore’s work, on view from November 19, 2017, until May 28, 2018. The exhibition tracks the artist’s work chronologically, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current work with digital platforms. Stephen Shore establishes the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argues for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Born in 1947, Shore spearheaded the New Color Photography movement in the United States in the 1970s, and became a major catalyst in the renewal of documentary photography in the late 1990s, both in the US and Europe, blending the tradition of American photographers such as Walker Evans with influences from various artistic movements, including Pop, Conceptualism, and even Photo-Realism. Shore’s images seem to achieve perfect neutrality, in both subject matter and approach. His approach cannot be reduced to a style but is best summed up with a few principles from which he has seldom deviated: the search for maximum clarity, the absence of retouching and reframing, and respect for natural light. Above all, he exercises discipline, limiting his shots as much as possible—one shot of a subject, and very little editing afterward.

Stephen Shore is organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 
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New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive

December 01, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented as part of the Club 57 exhibition, this survey celebrates film and video created during New York’s post-punk period, including landmark examples of No Wave, Cinema of Transgression, and independent films that grew out of the East Village scene and were first exhibited in area venues like Club 57, New Cinema, Millennium, and others. The richly diverse artists working during the heyday of the downtown scene left a vibrant legacy of Super8 filmmaking; collaborative works that have resonance as neighborhood home movies; and cinema that engages auteurist and genre cinema traditions, or upends them completely. Many of the filmmakers will be present, and we will premiere a number of recent MoMA preservations of little-seen and iconic titles alike.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

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Michelangelo Antonioni

December 07, 2017–January 07, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

It would be hard to overstate Michelangelo Antonioni’s influence on postwar cinema, architecture and design, fashion, literature, and philosophy, even on modern conceptions of the intellectual and the erotic. Antonioni (1912–2007), whose fascination with mediated reality only deepened over time, was a restless experimenter with composition, camera movement, cutting, and storytelling.

Presented with Luce Cinecittà, Rome, and featuring nearly 40 35mm prints and digital preservations, this first complete retrospective in New York in more than a decade celebrates the writer-director’s legendary collaborations with Monica Vitti—the trilogy of L’Avventura, L’Eclisse, and La Notte, which Pauline Kael myopically dismissed in her infamous essay “The Come-Dressed-As-the-Sick-Soul-of-Europe Parties”—as well as Red Desert, Blow-Up, and The Passenger. It also foregrounds Antonioni’s sociopolitical concerns through his neorealist documentary shorts and through his impressionistic yet incendiary Chung Kuo, Cina(1972), which lifted the Iron Curtain on China during the Cultural Revolution. Comparing the “antique and silent” beauty of Ferrara, his childhood town, with his “hard and hostile” experience of Rome, Antonioni might well have been describing the tensions within his own films: abstract, elliptical narratives involving men and women who are estranged from each other, from nature, and from themselves, and who drift through landscapes reflective of their existential despair and yearning.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, and Camilla Cormanni and Paola Ruggiero, Luce Cinecittà.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Modern Matinees: Considering Joseph Cotten

January 03, 2018–February 28, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

There was always a quiet intensity associated with the Virginia-born radio, theater, film, and television actor Joseph Cotten (1905–1994). Cotten’s best-known role is that of Jedediah Leland in Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane (1941), playing the champion of the enigmatic Charles Foster Kane. Cotten’s friendship with Welles began in the early 1930s, when both men worked at CBS Radio, and Welles brought Cotten into the Mercury Theatre company with starring roles on Broadway in Caesar (1937) and Danton’s Death (1938). After an early detour into filmmaking with Welles on Too Much Johnson—a film thought lost until 2013—Cotten returned to Broadway in 1939 to star in the original production of The Philadelphia Story.

The pair soon returned to film with Citizen Kane, followed by The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) and Journey into Fear (1943) (with a screenplay by Cotten based on the Eric Ambler novel). When Cotten decided to step out of Welles’s shadow, he was recognized by producer David O. Selznick, who wanted to place him under contract. And though Cotten was still legally bound to the Mercury Theatre company, Welles magnanimously voided the agreement. (Years later, in 1949, Cotten and Welles teamed up once again for Carol Reed’s The Third Man.)

Always versatile as a leading man, Cotten played a variety of roles in such Selznick films as Since You Went Away (1944), Duel in the Sun (1946), and Portrait of Jennie (1948). He returned to the stage in 1953, where he originated the role of Linus Larrabee in the Broadway production of Sabrina Fair, later adapted for the screen as Sabrina (1954), starring Humphrey Bogart and Audrey Hepburn. Toward the end of his career, in the 1960s and ’70s, Cotten lent a certain respectability to an assortment of sensational productions such as Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964), The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971), and Soylent Green (1973). This career-spanning selection of Cotten’s work is primarily drawn from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Fashion Forward Documentaries

January 08, 2018–January 18, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern?, these documentary films explore the intricate realm of fashion, capturing the designers, manufacturers, influencers, laborers, and consumers who—consciously and unconsciously—shape this mutable environment.

Selections include one of the earliest films made about a designer and his collection: Making Fashion (1938) is British documentarian Humphrey Jennings’s record of Norman Hartnell’s elegant but highly wearable spring/summer 1938 collection. In Alison Chernick’s The Artist Is Absent: A Short Film on Martin Margiela (2015), the viewer is virtually on the catwalk alongside models wearing garments made from repurposed plastic bags and threadbare sweaters. Like Hartnell, Margiela is focused on the construction and innovation of the item.

If the world of fashion once revolved around French couturiers, L’Amour fou (2010) and Versailles ’73 (2016) dig deeper than just a superficial homage to Yves Saint Laurent and the “runway rumble” between American and French designers. We learn that YSL’s life/business partner, Pierre Bergé, became a strident advocate and philanthropist for AIDS-related causes following the designer’s 2008 death. This is one of many instances in this series when the fashion world confronts social issues such as racism, economic disparity, AIDS, sexism, environmental threats, and the cult of celebrity.

Yet for many, the fashion industry is far less glamorous. In Zhangke Jia’s Wuyong (Useless) (2007), workers in Guangdong toil on clothing they could never conceive of affording. Machines (2016) depicts similar dehumanization in a textile factory in Gujarat, India, where the relationship between man and the machine is appallingly blurred. And The True Cost (2015) traces the devastating human and environmental toll of the affordable “fast fashion” industry.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Loveless: The World of Andrey Zvyagintsev

January 12, 2018–January 24, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Stark and austere in both style and theme, the films of Siberian-born Andrey Zvyagintsev explore moral dilemmas and spiritual torment with unabashed, painful honesty. Since his debut feature, The Return (2003), about a mystery-filled reunion between two teenagers and their father, the director has closely examined the subject of family, and all the love, secrets, violence, and betrayals that entails. His 2014 filmLeviathan, roundly hailed as a masterpiece, is a complex political allegory about an auto mechanic battling the oppression of the state and church, while confronting personal crises brewing at home. Zvyagintsev’s latest, Loveless (2017), is a gut-wrenching tale about a disintegrating marriage and a missing child. While uncovering the rawest human desires, motivations, and fears, Zvyagintsev allows the audience to sympathize, condemn, despair, or perhaps hope for a better world.

Frequently working with a core team of collaborators—including cowriter Oleg Negin, cinematographer Mikhail Krichman, editor Anna Mass, and production designer Andrey Ponkratov—Zvyagintsev creates unsettling, noir-ish tales and richly constructed tableaux. He is a rigorous formalist, an engrossing storyteller, and a biting social critic.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Alla Verlotsky of Seagull Films, Alexander Rodnyansky, and Sony Pictures Classics.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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