Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents the most comprehensive exhibition ever organized of photographer Stephen Shore’s work, on view from November 19, 2017, until May 28, 2018. The exhibition tracks the artist’s work chronologically, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current work with digital platforms. Stephen Shore establishes the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argues for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Born in 1947, Shore spearheaded the New Color Photography movement in the United States in the 1970s, and became a major catalyst in the renewal of documentary photography in the late 1990s, both in the US and Europe, blending the tradition of American photographers such as Walker Evans with influences from various artistic movements, including Pop, Conceptualism, and even Photo-Realism. Shore’s images seem to achieve perfect neutrality, in both subject matter and approach. His approach cannot be reduced to a style but is best summed up with a few principles from which he has seldom deviated: the search for maximum clarity, the absence of retouching and reframing, and respect for natural light. Above all, he exercises discipline, limiting his shots as much as possible—one shot of a subject, and very little editing afterward.

Stephen Shore is organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 
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New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive

December 01, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented as part of the Club 57 exhibition, this survey celebrates film and video created during New York’s post-punk period, including landmark examples of No Wave, Cinema of Transgression, and independent films that grew out of the East Village scene and were first exhibited in area venues like Club 57, New Cinema, Millennium, and others. The richly diverse artists working during the heyday of the downtown scene left a vibrant legacy of Super8 filmmaking; collaborative works that have resonance as neighborhood home movies; and cinema that engages auteurist and genre cinema traditions, or upends them completely. Many of the filmmakers will be present, and we will premiere a number of recent MoMA preservations of little-seen and iconic titles alike.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

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Michelangelo Antonioni

December 07, 2017–January 07, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

It would be hard to overstate Michelangelo Antonioni’s influence on postwar cinema, architecture and design, fashion, literature, and philosophy, even on modern conceptions of the intellectual and the erotic. Antonioni (1912–2007), whose fascination with mediated reality only deepened over time, was a restless experimenter with composition, camera movement, cutting, and storytelling.

Presented with Luce Cinecittà, Rome, and featuring nearly 40 35mm prints and digital preservations, this first complete retrospective in New York in more than a decade celebrates the writer-director’s legendary collaborations with Monica Vitti—the trilogy of L’Avventura, L’Eclisse, and La Notte, which Pauline Kael myopically dismissed in her infamous essay “The Come-Dressed-As-the-Sick-Soul-of-Europe Parties”—as well as Red Desert, Blow-Up, and The Passenger. It also foregrounds Antonioni’s sociopolitical concerns through his neorealist documentary shorts and through his impressionistic yet incendiary Chung Kuo, Cina(1972), which lifted the Iron Curtain on China during the Cultural Revolution. Comparing the “antique and silent” beauty of Ferrara, his childhood town, with his “hard and hostile” experience of Rome, Antonioni might well have been describing the tensions within his own films: abstract, elliptical narratives involving men and women who are estranged from each other, from nature, and from themselves, and who drift through landscapes reflective of their existential despair and yearning.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, and Camilla Cormanni and Paola Ruggiero, Luce Cinecittà.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Loveless: The World of Andrey Zvyagintsev

January 12, 2018–January 24, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Stark and austere in both style and theme, the films of Siberian-born Andrey Zvyagintsev explore moral dilemmas and spiritual torment with unabashed, painful honesty. Since his debut feature, The Return (2003), about a mystery-filled reunion between two teenagers and their father, the director has closely examined the subject of family, and all the love, secrets, violence, and betrayals that entails. His 2014 filmLeviathan, roundly hailed as a masterpiece, is a complex political allegory about an auto mechanic battling the oppression of the state and church, while confronting personal crises brewing at home. Zvyagintsev’s latest, Loveless (2017), is a gut-wrenching tale about a disintegrating marriage and a missing child. While uncovering the rawest human desires, motivations, and fears, Zvyagintsev allows the audience to sympathize, condemn, despair, or perhaps hope for a better world.

Frequently working with a core team of collaborators—including cowriter Oleg Negin, cinematographer Mikhail Krichman, editor Anna Mass, and production designer Andrey Ponkratov—Zvyagintsev creates unsettling, noir-ish tales and richly constructed tableaux. He is a rigorous formalist, an engrossing storyteller, and a biting social critic.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Alla Verlotsky of Seagull Films, Alexander Rodnyansky, and Sony Pictures Classics.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000)

February 03, 2018–March 11, 2018

Floor two, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents a major performance installation by Tania Bruguera (Cuban, born 1968), Untitled (Havana, 2000), for the first time since acquiring it in 2015, from February 3 through March 11, 2018. Initially conceived for the 7th Havana Biennial, the work was first presented in the Cabaña Fortress, a military bunker used as a jail for prisoners of conscience during the Cuban Revolution. The Fortress was used from colonial times through the early years of the Revolution as a site where the counter-revolutionary opposition was submitted to torture and execution by firing squad. Combining milled sugarcane, video footage of Fidel Castro, and live performance presented in near-total darkness, the work suggests the contradictions of life following the Cuban Revolution. The work, which was on view for mere hours before being shut down by the Cuban government in 2000, signifies Bruguera’s complex relationship to authority. Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000) is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, and performances produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

The exhibition is made possible by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil

February 11, 2018–June 03, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure for the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features nearly 130 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila―as she is affectionately known in Brazil―studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her “military service in Cubism,” ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette. The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Brazil, through Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, charting her involvement with an increasingly international artistic community, and her role in the emergence of modernism in Brazil; in 1928, Tarsila painted Abaporu, which quickly spawned the Anthropophagous Manifesto, and became the banner for this transformative artistic movement that sought to digest external influences and produce an art for and of Brazil itself.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, former Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Stephanie D’Alessandro, former Gary C. and Frances Comer Curator of International Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago; with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Modern Women’s Fund, and by the Vicky and Joseph Safra Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Clarice Oliveira Tavares and by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

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Being: New Photography 2018

March 18, 2018–August 19, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 13, with remarks to follow.

Being: New Photography 2018, the latest edition of MoMA’s longstanding and celebrated New Photography series, investigates charged and layered notions of personhood and subjectivity in recent photography and photo-based art, presenting works by 17 artists working in the US and internationally.

The works included in Being respond to diverse lived experiences and circumstances through a range of issues and tactics, including interrogations of traditional modes of photographic portraiture, the use of surrogates or masks as replacements for the body, tensions between privacy and exposure, formations of community or social relations, and the agency of the sitter and of the artist. Some works in the exhibition might be considered straightforward figurative depictions, while others do not include imagery of the human body at all. Since its earliest manifestations, photography has been widely seen as a means by which to capture an exact likeness of a person; the artists featured in Being mine or upset this rich history as they explore photographic representations of personhood today, when rights of representation are contested for many individuals.

Being: New Photography 2018 is constituted primarily of works made since 2016, both by artists who are just starting out in their careers, some showing in New York for the first time, and by others with more established practices who, in some cases, have been supporting the field of photography through teaching or creating other platforms for production. For all the artists, this will be the first exhibition of their work at the Museum.

The artists included are:

Sofia Borges (Brazilian, born 1984)
Matthew Connors (American, born 1976)
Sam Contis (American, born 1982)
Shilpa Gupta (Indian, born 1976)
Adelita Husni-Bey (Italian, born 1985)
Yazan Khalili (Palestinian, born Syria, 1981)
Harold Mendez (American, born 1977)
Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopian, born 1974)
Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương (American, born Hong Kong, 1979; American, born 1976)
B. Ingrid Olson (American, born 1987)
Joanna Piotrowska (Polish, born 1985)
Em Rooney (American, born 1983)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya (American, born 1982)
Andrzej Steinbach (German, born Poland, 1983)
Stephanie Syjuco (American, born Philippines, 1974)
Carmen Winant (American, born 1983)

Being: New Photography 2018 is organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Generous funding is provided by Courtney Finch Taylor.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 280 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, the exhibition, which will be seen in its entirety only at The Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor—the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The retrospective will provide an in-depth review of the full range of Piper’s work in diverse mediums: works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sound, and photo/text-based graphics spanning over five decades. Accompanying the exhibition will be a catalogue including essays by Christophe Cherix, Connie Butler, David Platzker, Okwui Enwezor, and Adrian Piper; and a reader with essays by Diarmuid Costello, Jörg Heiser, Kobena Mercer, Nizan Shaked, Vid Simoniti, and Elvan Zabunyan  – both published by the Museum; and a new autobiographical text by Piper published by the APRA Foundation Berlin. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over ten years and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist at the 56thVenice Biennale in 2015. 
 
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
 
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
 
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; David Platzker, Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.
 
Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
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Bodys Isek Kingelez

May 26, 2018–October 21, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

MoMA presents a full retrospective of Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015), the Congolese sculptor who worked with paper, commercial packaging, and materials from everyday life to create what he called “extreme maquettes” that encompass civic buildings, public monuments, and private pavilions. Bodys Isek Kingelez spans the artist’s career over a 25-year period, ranging from early works that were included in the landmark 1989 exhibition Magiciens de la terre at the Centre Pompidou to his streamlined, dramatic forms of the 2000s. The first retrospective of Kingelez’s work, and the first substantial monographic presentation of his work in the US, this exhibition features works from each of the key periods of his career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. Kingelez was previously featured in the MoMA exhibition Projects 59: Architecture as Metaphor (1997). Although his work has long been featured in major international exhibitions, this will the first opportunity in New York to explore the full breadth of his career. 

The exhibition unfolds as a chronological display with a thematic approach, bringing together works made during the artist’s first trip to Paris in 1989, civic structures, public monuments, and fantastic takes on geographically specific architectural tropes. The installation captures his transition from single buildings to entire metropolises, culminating in a selection of Kingelez’s large-scale cities, marked by soaring forms that characterize much of his late production. The exhibition brings together rarely seen works from both public and private collections. Special thanks to the artist Carsten Höller (German, born 1961), who is developing a visitor experience project in parallel with the exhibition.

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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