Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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MoMA Presents: Jean-Luc Godard’s Sympathy for the Devil (One Plus One)

September 13, 2018–September 19, 2018

 

MoMA premieres an exclusive New York theatrical run of the newly restored Rolling Stones/Godard collaboration Sympathy for the Devil (One Plus One). Martin Scorsese, in an interview, observed, “Sympathy for the Devil: now that’s quintessential. That movie, with the vignettes that [Jean-Luc] Godard intercuts with the rehearsal sessions…[a] still powerful and disturbing movie. It makes you rethink; it redefines your way of looking at life and reality and politics.” Keith Richards, in his memoir Life: “Politics came for us whether we liked it or not, once in the odd personage of Jean-Luc Godard, the great French cinematic innovator…. Sympathy for the Devil is by chance a record of the song by us of that name being born in the studio. The song turned after many takes from a Dylanesque, rather turgid folk song into a rocking samba—from a turkey into a hit—by a shift of rhythm, all recorded in stages by Jean-Luc….”
 
In his original version of the film, entitled One Plus One, Godard intentionally omitted the final studio recording of the song—an indication, to some, that the work of the “people’s revolution” remained unfinished. However, producer Ian Quarrier, in a bid to give Stones fans what they wanted, insisted on putting the complete song back in, and renamed the film Sympathy for the Devil. Thus at the end of each screening at MoMA, Godard’s unaltered ending for One Plus One will also be shown.
 

This new 4K digital restoration is presented on September 13 by cinematographer Tony Richmond (Don’t Look NowThe Man Who Fell to Earth), who supervised the color grading from the original 35mm camera negative. Courtesy of ABKCO Films.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Sympathy for the Devil. 1968. Great Britain. Written and directed by Jean-Luc Godard. 100 min.

Thursday, September 136:30 p.m., Theater 2
Friday, September 144:00 p.m., Theater 2
Saturday, September 157:30 p.m., Theater 2
Sunday, September 163:00 p.m., Theater 1
Monday, September 174:00 p.m., Theater 1
Tuesday, September 184:00 p.m., Theater 1
Wednesday, September 196:30 p.m., Theater 1
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The Eye of Iran: Cinematographer Mahmoud Kalari

September 14, 2018–September 30, 2018

 

Contemporary Iranian film has been earning worldwide acclaim since around 1990, when it became known for a neorealist streak characterized by authentic, simple depictions of life. The complex reality of Iran has, however, been explored by a wide range of cinematic voices, with formally and conceptually rigorous films dealing with subjects as diverse as urban life, women’s issues, interpersonal dramas, philosophy, all while creatively skirting strict censorship rules.

One figure has contributed to the look of this rich, multifaceted, evolving cinema like no other: cinematographer Mahmoud Kalari, who has lensed some of the most acclaimed works by Asghar Farhadi, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Dariush Mehrjui, and Jafar Panahi, to name just a few. Beyond these celebrated masters, Kalari has also collaborated with young and emerging directors, making him a constant presence across the wide gamut of Iranian cinema. Kalari approaches each film with no preconceptions, devising for each a specific visual style. From dynamic handheld camerawork to stark minimalism, placid countryside to gritty metropolis, short shot to long take (in one case lasting over two hours—the entire length of the film), he is undaunted by any boundary. Kalari has steadily, over three decades, focused our gaze on Iran.

This exhibition includes 12 films, from 1996 to the present, by 10 directors, including Kalari himself. Special thanks to Mahyar Kalari, Faryar Javaherian, Bahman Farmanara, Godfrey Cheshire, Kathy Geritz of Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, and Emily Rago.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

 
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Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done

September 16, 2018–February 03, 2019

Floor Two, Contemporary Galleries and the Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Wednesday, September 12, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

For a brief period in the early 1960s, a group of choreographers, visual artists, composers, and filmmakers made use of a local church to present performances that Village Voice critic Jill Johnston declared the most exciting new developments in dance in a generation. Redefining the kinds of movement that could count as dance, the Judson participants—Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Philip Corner, Bill Dixon, Judith Dunn, David Gordon, Alex Hay, Deborah Hay, Fred Herko, Robert Morris, Steve Paxton, Rudy Perez, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Rauschenberg, Carolee Schneemann, and Elaine Summers, among others—would go on to profoundly shape all fields of art in the second half of the 20th century. Taking its name from the Judson Memorial Church, a socially engaged Protestant congregation in New York’s Greenwich Village, Judson Dance Theater was organized as a series of open workshops from which its participants developed performances. Together, the artists challenged traditional understandings of choreography, expanding dance in ways that reconsidered its place in the world. They employed new compositional methods to strip dance of its theatrical conventions, incorporating “ordinary” movements—gestures typical of the street or home, for example, rather than a stage—into their work, along with games, simple tasks, and social dances to infuse their pieces with a sense of spontaneity.

Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done highlights the ongoing significance of the history of Judson Dance Theater, beginning with the workshops and classes led by Anna Halprin, Robert Ellis Dunn, and James Waring and exploring the influence of other figures working downtown such as Simone Forti and Andy Warhol, as well as venues for collective action like Judson Gallery and the Living Theatre. Through live performance and some 300 objects including film, photographic documentation, sculptural objects, scores, music, poetry, architectural drawings, and archival material, the exhibition celebrates the group’s multidisciplinary and collaborative ethos as well as the range of its participants. The Work Is Never Done includes a gallery exhibition, a print publication, and an ambitious performance program in the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium.

The exhibition is organized by Ana Janevski, Curator, and Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Leadership support is provided by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions, and by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Major support is provided by Jody and John Arnhold and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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MoMA Presents: Xu Bing’s Dragonfly Eyes

September 21, 2018–September 27, 2018

 

Few images come closer to reality than those recorded by surveillance cameras. In China, a country with strict film censorship, an estimated 200 million such cameras have been installed to capture life unfiltered; mundane daily activities are mixed with dramatic events beyond the realm of imagination. Visual artist Xu Bing’s first feature film stitches together surveillance footage collected from the Internet to create a fictional tale about a young woman traversing life in modern China. The result is a provocative tale as mundane, surreal, and outlandish as reality itself. Known for works that consistently disrupt our understanding of what we see—from Book from the Sky, an installation of books and scrolls with printed “fake” Chinese characters, to Phoenix, giant phoenix sculptures made of salvaged materials—Xu persistently explores the relationship between vision and meaning.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Friday, September 217:00 p.m., Theater 2
Saturday, September 22, 4:00 p.m., Theater 2
Sunday, September 234:00 p.m., Theater 1
Monday, September 244:00 p.m., Theater 2
Tuesday, September 254:30 p.m., Theater 2
Wednesday, September 26, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
Thursday, September 277:30 p.m., Theater 2
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The Unknown Jerry: Home Movies and More from the Jerry Lewis Collection at the Library of Congress

October 02, 2018–October 11, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Although his official debut as a filmmaker wouldn’t occur until The Bellboy in 1960, Jerry Lewis actually began directing movies soon after his arrival in Hollywood in 1949. Working with a group of close industry friends, Lewis wrote, photographed, and directed a series of 16mm films that pushed the definition of “home movies” to its limits, featuring synchronized sound, professional acting, and fully developed storylines. Presented as “Gar-Ron Productions”—the name came from Jerry and Patti Lewis’s two oldest sons, Gary and Ron—these fledgling efforts featured the Lewis’s close friends Janet Leigh and Tony Curtis, Jerry’s screen partner Dean Martin, writers Harry Crane and Danny Arnold (later of Barney Miller fame), and a rotating cast of family members and Pacific Palisades neighbors. Made between 1951 and 1955, these neophyte works reveal an intuitive understanding of framing and cutting that would blossom with Lewis’s great feature films of the 1960s (a sampling of which are included here). Newly preserved by the Library of Congress, these films are being shown here for the first time in their entirety. This series is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Looking at Jerry Lewis: The Nutty Professor Storyboards, on view in The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Rob Stone, Moving Image Curator, The Library of Congress; Chris Lewis, American Wheelchair Mission; and Jamie Lee Curtis.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Charles White: A Retrospective

October 07, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 2, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

With Charles White: A Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago present the first major museum exhibition of Charles White’s oeuvre in over 30 years, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 7, 2018, through January 13, 2019. Covering the full breadth of his career with over 100 multidisciplinary works, the exhibition features drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, and contextual ephemera. Prior to its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will be on view at the Art Institute of Chicago from June 8 through September 3, 2018. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019.

Beginning in the late 1930s and concluding with White’s premature death in 1979, the exhibition features a detailed overview of his work over a four-decade span of enormous change in the US that provided a constant wellspring of subject matter for the artist. The presentation reveals White as a responsive visual strategist who was open to exploring styles and techniques inspired by contemporary art and culture, and a savvy interpreter of an evolving political climate. White’s commitment to figuration, to directly addressing the social and political concerns of his time, and to mastering mediums that allowed for wide circulation of his art established him as a major figure, and one with significant influence on his peers and followers.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section will be supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

Charles White: A Retrospective is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Sarah Kelly Oehler, Field-McCormick Chair and Curator of American Art, Art Institute of Chicago.

The exhibition is supported at The Museum of Modern Art and at the Art Institute of Chicago by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., and by The Dian Woodner Exhibition Endowment Fund.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
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Hammer Horror: A Frankenstein Septet

October 12, 2018–September 18, 2018

 

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818, has inspired hundreds of films; in 1910 Thomas Edison produced the first cinematic version in his Bronx studio, starring Charles Stanton Ogle as the monster. Hollywood audiences fell in love with Frankenstein after the 1931 Universal Pictures version, featuring Boris Karloff’s iconic block-headed, neck-bolted creature and the hysterical doctor’s spectacular laboratory of tesla coils and steam-spewing equipment, all in glorious black and white.

In 1957, the British production company Hammer Films produced the first of its seven Frankenstein films, which focused more on the Gothic aspects of the book and the obsession, ambition, and guilt of the doctor (usually played by Peter Cushing). These films overflow with mournful music, overwrought Victorian décor and costumes, lusty characters, and decidedly more disfigured, wrathful monsters—all amplified by a highly artificial, gruesome color palette that makes even a glimpse of blood into a horrifying experience.

Hammer Horror: A Frankenstein Septet is presented in conjunction with It’s Alive! Frankenstein at 200, a visual history of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, at The Morgan Library and Museum October 12, 2018–January 27, 2019.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Karpo Godina

October 19, 2018–October 25, 2018

 

An essential figure of Yugoslav cinema, Karpo Godina infused the radical “Black Wave” of the 1960s with an irrepressible expressive freedom—squarely targeted against all forms of repression—and thrived long after the end of Titoism and the breakup of Yugoslavia in civil war. For more than 30 years, the half-Slovenian, half-Macedonian filmmaker has brought a playfully anarchical spirit to the poetics and politics of film, moving breathlessly between fiction and nonfiction in his avant-garde shorts of the 1960s and ’70s and his feature films of the 1980s and ’90s.

Godina was a frequent collaborator of Bahrudin “Bato” Čengić, Želimir Žilnik, Lordan Zafranović, and other pioneering members of the Black Wave, and he has since worked comfortably in the former Yugoslavian republics as a director, screenwriter, cinematographer, and editor.

Karpo Godina makes a rare appearance at MoMA to present his first career retrospective in the US, coinciding with the exhibition Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980.

Organized by Jurij Meden, Curator, Austrian Filmmuseum; Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Ana Janevski, Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts

October 21, 2018–February 18, 2019

The Museum of Modern Art, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor, and MoMA PS1

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 16, 2018
9:00-11:00 a.m. - Exhibition viewing at MoMA PS1
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Remarks at The Museum of Modern Art in Titus Theater 2 (livestream)
12:30-4:00 p.m. - Exhibition viewing at The Museum of Modern Art; MoMA PS1 galleries continue to be open to press

The exhibition is on view at The Museum of Modern Art October 21, 2018–February 18, 2019, and at MoMA PS1 October 21, 2018–February 25, 2019.

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 present the first comprehensive retrospective in 25 years devoted to the work of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941), on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 21, 2018, through February 18, 2019, and at MoMA PS1 from October 21, 2018, through February 25, 2019. Co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel, Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts draws upon the rich holdings of both institutions and nearly 70 lenders. Encompassing Nauman’s full career, the exhibition occupies the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the whole of MoMA PS1. This joint presentation will provide an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture to neon, performance, film and video, and architecturally scaled environments.

Since 1970, Nauman has frequently worked on a monumental scale, necessitating this expansive presentation across both of MoMA’s locations. Both venues include works in all mediums and from all phases of Nauman’s career, offering distinct but complementary perspectives on his wide-ranging practice. The characteristics of the two spaces have shaped the curatorial approach to each. The flexibility of The Museum of Modern Art’s sixth-floor galleries are uniquely suited to some of the artist’s largest works, and the exhibition moves swiftly from Nauman’s early sculptures derived from his own body to room-size installations that directly involve the viewer. The suite of former classrooms in MoMA PS1’s historic building houses over 120 works, organized thematically to chart the recurrence of key concepts across the decades. The presentation highlights the underlying consistencies in a seemingly disparate body of work, as the artist revisits his earlier motifs and concerns with new urgency.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel.

The exhibition is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Laurenz Foundation Curator and Advisor to the Director, The Museum of Modern Art; with Heidi Naef, Chief Curator, and Isabel Friedli, Curator, Schaulager Basel; and Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel.

Leadership support is provided by The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Generous funding is provided by The Hayden Family Foundation, Sully Bonnelly and Robert R. Littman, Ellen and William Taubman, and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund and by The Museum of Modern Art’s Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

 

 

 

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Catalan Cinema’s Radical Years, 1968–1978

October 25, 2018–November 10, 2018

 

This series traces 10 revolutionary years in the history of Catalan cinema: the period between 1968 and 1978, when the fate of Spain—and Catalonia’s place in it—lay in the balance. The death of General Francisco Franco on November 20, 1975, and the ascension of Juan Carlos I to the throne made possible the nation’s transition from brutal dictatorship to fragile democracy. The Catalan language, after nearly a half-century of censorship, could once again be expressed freely in the streets and in the arts.

Filmmakers who during the last years of dictatorship had risked their lives by shooting clandestinely or by encoding their scripts with politically subversive ideas responded to a newfound freedom after 1976 with work that continues to excite and provoke. The exhibition, drawn entirely from the archives of the Filmoteca de Catalunya, spans the decade from the radicalism of 1968 to the first democratic elections in 1977 and the writing of the Constitution of Spain the following year. It includes films by Pere Portabella, Antoni Ribas, and others that explore the legacy of the Spanish Civil War, the surge of immigrants into Barcelona and other cities in Catalonia from other parts of Spain, Catalan national identity, the clash of dissident movements, feminist and class struggle, and sexual liberation.

Program descriptions are written by Esteve Riambau. All films courtesy of the Filmoteca de Catalunya.

Organized by Esteve Riambau, Director, Filmoteca de Catalunya, and Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

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