Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule
Notorious. 1946. USA. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Modern Matinees: Mr. Cary Grant

April 05, 2017–May 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Cary Grant (American, b. Great Britain, 1904–1986) has always been described as a versatile actor. He possessed a keen wit and comic timing that made him a natural with the rapid banter of screwball comedies, and his charm and elegant good looks propelled him into the rarified company of cinema’s great leading men. From the start of his film career, in 1932, to its conclusion, in 1966, Grant worked with a who’s-who of iconic directors—from George Cukor to Alfred Hitchcock—on everything from outrageous physical comedies to intense dramas and thrillers.

The Bristol, England–born Archibald Leach was spellbound by vaudeville, and joined an acrobatic act called The Penders as a stilt walker. In 1920, Leach arrived in New York, where The Penders performed at the Hippodrome, and he remained in the States for several years. An uninspiring screen test at Paramount Pictures in 1931 nonetheless garnered him a contract—and a demand by studio head B. P. Schulberg that he change his name. Thus Cary Grant was born.

Elegant, mischievous, good-humored, masculine, cheeky, and sensual but never overbearing or pompous, Grant’s greatest gift was his peerless versatility. This series demonstrates that range with highlights from Grant’s three decades in American cinema, drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection. All films are from the US and star Cary Grant.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Maureen Gallace

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

The first survey of paintings by American artist Maureen Gallace, Clear Day features nearly 70 works spanning the artist’s career. For more than 25 years, Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has painted genre scenes drawn from the American landscape and still life traditions. Her small canvases and panels most commonly depict rural pastorals and coastlines, typically featuring nondescript barns or cottages amid dunes and foliage that evoke a nostalgic New England. Recalling holiday cards and vacation snapshots, Gallace’s paintings quietly disturb the reassuring sentimentality of such pictures. Often lacking doors or windows, her houses may seem locked up, or disquietingly open and vulnerable to the elements. Her lush gardens and yards can be obstructed by fences, and paths lead the viewer astray; infinite vistas over the ocean are stacked and collapsed into shallow compositions. From the outset of her career, Gallace has deployed a range of abstract compositional tools to frustrate the romantic enticements of her subject matter and the painterly seductions of her surfaces, giving rise to a quietly remarkable and contemporary body of work.

Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at Maureen Paley, London (2016); 303 Gallery, New York (2015); La Conservera, Murcia, Spain (2011); The Art Institute of Chicago (2006); Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2004); Dallas Museum of Art (2003); and Museum Schloss-Hardenberg, Velbert, Germany (1996). Group shows in which she has participated include September 11, MoMA PS1 (2011) and the Whitney Biennial (2010).

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Ian Cheng

Ian Cheng: EMISSARIES

April 9–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. museum solo exhibition for Ian Cheng, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015–17), a series of live simulation works created using a video game engine. Described by the artist as “a video game that plays itself,” the works are comprised of computer-generated simulations like those used in predictive technologies for complex scenarios such as climate change or elections. Populated by a cast of characters and wildlife that interact, intervene, and recombine in open-ended narratives, Cheng’s simulations evolve endlessly as self-contained ecosystems. The exhibition EMISSARIES marks the completion of this series of works, which contemplate timeless questions about evolution, the origins of human consciousness, and ways of relating to a chaotic existence. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is on display for the first time at MoMA PS1.

EMISSARIES is presented as a large-scale installation that transforms the gallery into a portal-like environment for Cheng’s simulations to build, generate, regress, and progress.  The 10-foot-tall projections allow each simulation to unfold at life-size, positioning viewers as observers who can follow the lives of specific characters as they interact within the simulated worlds and each other in an ever-changing environment.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms, an exhibition featuring the work of the Slovakian artist and documentary filmmaker. Since 2009, Rafa (b. Žilina, 1979) has employed the methods of cinéma verité to document what he refers to as “new nationalisms” across Central Europe, creating vivid and stirring portraits of the resurgence of extreme right-wing, xenophobic, and neo-fascist groups in the region.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; and Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Past Skin

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

In today’s technological environment, we can style, extend, and broadcast ourselves at will, projecting into digital realms that in turn shape us. The six artists in Past Skin take up science historian and cyber-feminist Donna Haraway’s provocation, “Why should our body end at the skin?,” testing the growing porosity between our bodies and habitats in a contemporary world where virtuality is ubiquitous and surreality is increasingly normalized. As much as we exert influence on our bodies and surroundings, the technologies that enable this influence also influence us. No longer simply “users” of technology, we become players renegotiating the stakes of our world, engineering natural and synthetic environments to fulfill social imperatives and emotional needs. Featuring 20 works across a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, drawing, sound, video, and virtual reality—by artists Cui Jie, Jordan Kasey, Hannah Levy, Abigail Lucien, Jillian Mayer, MSHR, and Madelon Vriesendorp, Past Skin highlights works that merge figures with landscapes to examine the state of the contemporary body in and beyond nature.

Past Skin is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

 

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A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976–2000

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976-2000, a selection of archival materials documenting the vast array of artists who worked and exhibited in the museum’s building over the course of its first 25 years. Surveying a period that spans from the institution’s inaugural 1976 exhibition Rooms to its merger with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000, the exhibition brings together hundreds of objects drawn from the MoMA PS1 Archives, including artist’s proposals, exhibition posters, photographs, correspondence, flyers, postcards, residency applications, and other ephemera.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1; and Jonathan Lill, Leon Levy Foundation Project Manager, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Ekstase (Ecstasy). 1933. Czechoslovakia. Directed by Gustav Machatý. Courtesy of NFA

Ecstasy and Irony: Czech Cinema, 1927–1943

April 11, 2017–April 23, 2017

 

Czech cinema is known today largely for the extraordinary creative flowering, known as the Czechoslovak New Wave, that took place during a relaxation of Soviet domination in the 1960s, producing such major artists as Milos Forman and Ivan Passer. But before (and even during) World War II, Czechoslovakia was home to a highly sophisticated and formally advanced film industry. Programmed in collaboration with the Czech National Film Archive (NFA), this program looks at the wide range of that prewar achievement, including pioneering modernist works like  Přemysl Pražský’s Battalion, Karl Anton’s Tonka of the Gallows, Carl Junghans’s Such Is Life and Vladislav Vančura’s On the Sunny Side; the pointed political comedies of Voskovec and Werich; and the brilliant avant-garde work of Gustav Machatý, including the boldly symbolist Erotikon and his early sound masterpiece From Saturday to Sunday, screening here in the world premiere of a new restoration from the NFA. A selection of rarely screened prints from MoMA’s archive adds a sense of the more popular cinema of the period, with major stars such as Oldřich Nový (in Martin Frič’s Lubitschian masterpiece Kristián) and Hugo Haas (in his film of Karel Čapek’s 1937 anti-Nazi allegory The White Disease).

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Michal Bregant, Executive Director, Národní filmový archive/National Film Archive of the Czech Republic.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15, 2017–August 13, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, April 11, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Remarks will be livestreamed at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning but still relatively under-recognized achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features nearly100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by more than 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse. The exhibition will also feature many little-known treasures such as collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and recent acquisitions on view for the first time at MoMA by Ruth Asawa, Carol Rama, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

 

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Stormy Weather. 1943. USA. Directed by Andrew L. Stone. Film Study Center Special Collections

Making Faces on Film: A Collaboration with BFI Black Star

April 18, 2017–April 26, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art, in collaboration with the British Film Institute, presents Making Faces on Film, which highlights visions of black representation, empowerment, and exploitation in cinema from the silent-film era through the 1970s. On view April 18 through 26 in the Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters, the series explores how images of blackness have been historically constructed and challenged both within and outside the mainstream film industry. Making Faces on Film, jointly inspired by the MoMA exhibition Making Faces: Images of Exploitation and Empowerment in Cinema and the recent BFI Black Star season, reflects the ethos of both—exploring representations of historical others in film, and the versatility and power of black actors.

Providing vital context for ongoing conversations about the complexities of representing race on screen, Making Faces on Film spotlights a range of iconic performances and forms of storytelling. The series includes the earliest known black-cast film, Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913), starring Bert Williams (who is highlighted here as America’s first pop star); the debut of Sidney Poitier in the taut race-relations noir No Way Out (1950); and a celebration of black female empowerment in the larger-than-life blaxploitation persona of Cleopatra Jones (1973), contrasted with Bush Mama (1975), a vérité-style docudrama from the LA Rebellion movement. A double feature of the delightful musical Stormy Weather (1943), starring Lena Horne and Bill Robinson, and Julie Dash’s Illusions (1982) depicts hard-won opportunities for black performers in the Golden Age of Hollywood. The film series also juxtaposes the iconic with the contemporary, with newly commissioned jazz accompaniment by Braxton Cook for the Body and Soul (1925) screening, and by Braxton Cook with Taber Gable for Lime Kiln Club Field Day.

Introductions by academics, including Michelle Materre, Brandon Harris, and Ed Guerrero, provide current perspectives, as does a night of recent short films by Ephraim Asili, Akosua Adoma Owusu, and Lauren Kelley on April 20, organized at The Studio Museum in Harlem. On April 17, in anticipation of the series, a special Modern Mondays evening with Ja’Tovia Gary presents a selection of screenings and a conversation with the Brooklyn-based filmmaker and documentarian, whose work centers on images of blackness, femininity, and nontraditional origins.

Organized by Dessane Cassell, Joint Fellow, Department of Film, MoMA, and The Studio Museum in Harlem; and Ashley Clark, Season Programmer, BFI Black Star in conjunction with the British Film Institute.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Pętla (The Noose). 1958. Poland. Directed by Wojciech Has. Courtesy of Film Studio Kadr.

MoMA Presents: Wojciech Has’s The Noose and How to Be Loved

April 27, 2017–May 03, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Pawel Pawlikowski, director of the Academy Award–winning Ida, has called Wojciech Has (1925–2000) “a completely unrecognized genius, probably the most talented Polish director since the war, with his own sensibility and vision.”

Celebrating the publication of Annette Insdorf’s Intimations: The Cinema of Wojciech Has (Northwestern University Press, 2017), MoMA presents the New York premiere theatrical runs of Has’s feature debut, The Noose (1958), an expressionistic portrait of an alcoholic at the end of his rope; and How to Be Loved (1963), a chamber piece involving a famous radio actress haunted by her wartime past. Insdorf, a professor of film at Columbia University’s School of the Arts and moderator of the Reel Pieces series at Manhattan’s 92nd Street Y, will introduce the opening-night screenings on April 27, and will also sign copies of her book on May 3 at 6:00 p.m.     

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art. Presented in association with The Adam Mickiewicz Institute (Grzegorz Skorupski) and the KADR Studio, Warsaw. Special thanks to Hanna Hartowicz, New York Polish Film Festival; and Tomek Smolarski, Polish Cultural Institute New York. 

 

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