Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Print-Friendly Schedule
Ian Cheng

Ian Cheng: Emissaries

April 09, 2017–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present Ian Cheng’s (b. 1984) first U.S. museum solo presentation, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015-2017), a series of three live simulation video works dedicated to the history of cognitive evolution. These works ask us to imagine technology not as a subordinate reflection of our own minds, but as a tool to model a non-anthropomorphic vision of history and consciousness. Using an engine for developing video games, Emissary is made up of open-ended animations with no fixed outcome or narrative—a format Cheng calls live simulation. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Ekstase (Ecstasy). 1933. Czechoslovakia. Directed by Gustav Machatý. Courtesy of NFA

Ecstasy and Irony: Czech Cinema, 1927–1943

April 11, 2017–April 23, 2017

 

Czech cinema is known today largely for the extraordinary creative flowering, known as the Czechoslovak New Wave, that took place during a relaxation of Soviet domination in the 1960s, producing such major artists as Milos Forman and Ivan Passer. But before (and even during) World War II, Czechoslovakia was home to a highly sophisticated and formally advanced film industry. Programmed in collaboration with the Czech National Film Archive (NFA), this program looks at the wide range of that prewar achievement, including pioneering modernist works like  Přemysl Pražský’s Battalion, Karl Anton’s Tonka of the Gallows, Carl Junghans’s Such Is Life and Vladislav Vančura’s On the Sunny Side; the pointed political comedies of Voskovec and Werich; and the brilliant avant-garde work of Gustav Machatý, including the boldly symbolist Erotikon and his early sound masterpiece From Saturday to Sunday, screening here in the world premiere of a new restoration from the NFA. A selection of rarely screened prints from MoMA’s archive adds a sense of the more popular cinema of the period, with major stars such as Oldřich Nový (in Martin Frič’s Lubitschian masterpiece Kristián) and Hugo Haas (in his film of Karel Čapek’s 1937 anti-Nazi allegory The White Disease).

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Michal Bregant, Executive Director, Národní filmový archive/National Film Archive of the Czech Republic.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Joan Mitchell (American, 1925–1992). Ladybug. 1957. Oil on canvas, 6' 5 7/8" x 9' (197.9 x 274 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1961. © Estate of Joan Mitchell

Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15, 2017–August 13, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, April 11, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by some 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse. The exhibition will also feature many little-known treasures such as collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and recent acquisitions on view for the first time at MoMA by Ruth Asawa, Carol Rama, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Stormy Weather. 1943. USA. Directed by Andrew L. Stone. Film Study Center Special Collections

Making Faces on Film: A Collaboration with BFI Black Star

April 18, 2017–April 26, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

A collaboration between MoMA and the British Film Institute, Making Faces on Film celebrates the legacy of black artists working both within and outside the mainstream film industry. From Hollywood icons like Lena Horne and Sidney Poitier to independent trailblazers like Spencer Williams and Marlon Riggs, this series explores the vibrancy and resilience of black representation in cinema, which has thrived against a backdrop of industry constraints, structural racism, and exclusion from the Hollywood apparatus.

Jointly inspired by the MoMA exhibition Making Faces: Images of Exploitation and Empowerment in Cinema and the recent BFI Black Star season, this series presents films that reflect the ethos of both endeavors. MoMA’s Making Faces installation explores the representation of historical “others” through the lens of mainstream cinema stills from the silent era through the Blaxploitation films of the 1970s. Black Star was a major season of screenings and events celebrating the versatility and power of black actors. Black Star was originally shown in London at BFI Southbank, and will tour internationally.

Organized by Dessane Cassell, Joint Fellow, Department of Film, MoMA, and The Studio Museum in Harlem; and Ashley Clark, Season Programmer, BFI Black Star in conjunction with the British Film Institute.

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MoMA_Lawler_Why Pictures Now

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW

April 30, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, and The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW is the first major survey in New York of the artist Louise Lawler (American, b. 1947), spanning the 40-year creative output of one of the most influential artists working in the fields of image production and institutional critique. The exhibition takes its title from one of Lawler’s most iconic works, Why Pictures Now (1982), a black-and-white photograph showing a matchbook propped up in an ashtray. Reminiscent of an advertising photograph or a film noir still, it asks the viewer to consider why the work takes the form of a picture, and why the artist is making pictures now. Lawler came of age as part of the Pictures Generation, a loosely knit, highly independent group of artists named for an influential exhibition, Pictures, organized in 1977 by art historian Douglas Crimp at Artists Space in New York. These artists used photography and appropriation-driven strategies to examine the functions and codes of representation. Lawler’s signature style was established in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when she began taking pictures of other artists’ works displayed in collectors’ homes, museums, storage spaces, and auction houses to question the value, meaning, and use of art. WHY PICTURES NOW is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, with Kelly Sidley, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Generous funding is provided by the Walton Family Foundation, David Dechman and Michel Mercure, Fotene Demoulas and Tom Coté, Tracy and Gary Mezzatesta, Patrice and Louis Friedman, Mark Diker,and by Ann and Mel Schaffer.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Ladies Must Love. E.A. Dupont. 1933. USA

Son of Universal: More Rediscovered Gems from the Laemmle Years

May 05, 2017–May 16, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Following last summer’s monthlong series Universal Pictures: Restorations and Rediscoveries, MoMA presents another selection of extremely rare films produced during the risk-taking reign of studio head Carl Laemmle, Jr. Work to be screened includes Tod Browning’s ferocious 1930 gangster film Outside the Law, starring a pre–Little Cesar Edward G. Robinson; Tay Garnett’s stylistically audacious allegory Destination Unknown (1931); E. A. Dupont’s risqué Broadway romp Ladies Must Love (1933), and two programs of long-unseen, newly restored musical and comedy shorts, assembled by guest curator Ron Hutchinson of the Vitaphone Project. For individual film listings, visit moma.org/film.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

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Kokoa. 1985. Niger. Directed by Moustapha Alassane.

Moustapha Alassane, Pioneer of the Golden Age of Nigerien Cinema

May 12, 2017–May 15, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

This first North American retrospective of Moustapha Alassane (1942–2015), a pioneer of populist cinema in newly independent Niger in the 1960s and 1970s, is presented in association with La Cinematheque Afrique de l’Institut français. A fabulist who sheathed the sharp sting of his political satire within playful stories of water genies, pugilistic frogs, cowboys, and brave fishermen, Alassane parodied colonialist attitudes toward black Africans, the corrupt despotism of local officials, and the shallow materialism of Niger’s youth in a series of animated, fictional, and ethnographic films that remain beloved and influential even today. The lure of cinema, with its magical play of shadow and light, inspired Alassane to give up his career as a mechanic and turn toward making art for the masses. His earliest animated films were simple projections of cardboard cutouts, but his work quickly matured, leading to friendships and collaborations with Zalia Souley, the dean of Nigerien movie acting, and the French documentarian Jean Rouch and the Canadian animator Norman McLaren. Alassane’s films are vital and imaginative records of Nigerien traditions and rituals: his first feature, Aoure (1962), presents the married life of a young Zharma (ethnic Muslim) couple on the banks of the Niger River; his 1973 film Shaki documents the ascension of a Yoruban king and the syncretic intermingling of traditional customs and beliefs with those of Islam and Protestantism. All films are from Niger, directed by Moustapha Alassane, and in French and Hausa with English subtitles, unless otherwise noted. 

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, with Amélie Garin-Davet, French Embassy in New York. Special thanks to Mathieu Fournet.

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Peter Moore. Photograph of Robert Rauschenberg’s Pelican (1963) as performed in a former CBS television studio, New York, during the First New York Theater Rally, May 1965. Photo © Barbara Moore/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. © 2016 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends

May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017

Floor Four, Collection Galleries

In 1959, Robert Rauschenberg wrote, “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. (I try to act in that gap between the two.)” His work in this gap shaped artistic practice for decades to come.

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

Robert Rauschenberg, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Acclaimed artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas is collaborating on the exhibition’s design to foreground Rauschenberg’s work with dance and performance. MoMA’s presentation is structured as an “open monograph”—as other artists came into Rauschenberg’s creative life, they come into the exhibition, mapping the exchange of ideas. These figures include John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Sari Dienes, Jasper Johns, Billy Klüver, Yvonne Rainer, Paul Taylor, David Tudor, Cy Twombly, Susan Weil, and many others.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art. 
The exhibition design was created in collaboration with the artist Charles Atlas.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Robert Rauschenberg.

The exhibition is supported at Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by Glenn and Eva Dubin, Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, Mrs. Ronnie F. Heyman, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III in honor of Jerry I. Speyer, and by Tiffany & Co.

Generous funding is provided by west elm.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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Incense, Sweaters, and Ice (film still) 2017. Courtesy the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York.

Projects 106: Martine Syms

May 27, 2017–July 16, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

Projects 106: Martine Syms, the first US solo museum exhibition by Martine Syms (b. 1988, Los Angeles), is an immersive installation including photographs and staged objects, and centering around a new feature-length film, Incense, Sweaters, and Ice.

Shot on location in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, Incense, Sweaters, and Ice follows three protagonists—Mrs. Queen Esther Bernetta White, Girl, and WB (“whiteboy”)—as they navigate dramas of surveillance, moving between watching, being watched, and remaining unseen. Accompanying the film is a suite of photographs sized to standard American movie posters and a metal mesh structure inspired by the geographies of the Great Migration.

Using video and performance, Syms examines representations of blackness and its relationship to narrative, vernacular, feminist thought, and radical traditions. Her artwork has been exhibited and screened extensively, including presentations at the Berlin Biennale, Manifesta 11, ICA London, The Hammer Museum, the New Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Initiated by MoMA in 1971 as a platform for new and experimental art, the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series, now presented at both The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1, provides a forum for the most urgent international voices in contemporary art. Projects 106: Martine Syms will be accompanied by an illustrated brochure. On the occasion of her exhibition, Syms will premiere a new lecture-performance as part of MoMA’s educational programming.

Projects 106: Martine Syms is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Plan for Greater Baghdad, Baghdad. Project, 1957. Aerial perspective of the cultural center and University from the north. Ink, pencil, and colored pencil on tracing paper, 34 7/8 x 52" (88.6 x 132.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise approximately 450 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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