Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Marie Losier: Just A Million Dreams

November 01, 2018–November 11, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art presents a mid-career retrospective celebrating French artist and experimental filmmaker Marie Losier, from November 1 through 11, 2018. Marie Losier: Just a Million Dreams highlights two dozen short films and two feature length films made over the last 15 years, seen together for the first time. Losier’s anticipated second feature, Cassandro the Exotico!—a portrait of the titular gender-bending lucha libre icon—premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival in the ACID section, and opens the MoMA series in its American premiere. Best known for poetic 16mm film portraits of avant-garde musicians and filmmakers that transcend documentary conventions, Losier is dedicated to analog 16mm filmmaking in a digital age, shooting, editing, and often producing films entirely herself. The series also celebrates the recent addition of 19 of Losier’s films to the Museum’s collection, as part of MoMA’s ongoing commitment to contemporary moving-image work. 

A longtime New York resident, Losier arrived in 1994 to study painting and quickly fell into the orbit of luminaries who would later appear in her pictures: she designed props for Richard Foreman and learned to shoot 16mm with Mike Kuchar at the Millennium Film Workshop (all the while beginning to curate screenings around town). For Losier, these intergenerational connections go hand in hand with a boundless urge to create art with others through films that channel the unfettered spirit of artistic creation. Replete with physical comedy reminiscent of silent cinema and campy fantasy in the tradition of Jack Smith, Losier’s cinema is, above all, rooted in performance. Losier’s highly personal body of work, ranging from intimate portraits to rollicking performance films with costumes and sets created by the artist, music videos, and genre-inflected narratives, is unified by her intuitive attention to rhythm and handmade compositions.

Marie Losier: Just A Million Dreams is organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

The exhibition is supported in part by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Scorsese in New York

November 02, 2018–November 10, 2018

 

On the occasion of The Museum of Modern Art’s 11th Annual Film Benefit, which honors Martin Scorsese, we are proud to present 11 of Scorsese’s films, all set in his hometown of New York City.

A pair of New York institutions, Scorsese and MoMA have had a long and fruitful relationship; the Museum’s collection includes 20 of the director’s films, and his commitment to film preservation and stewardship of The Film Foundation has formed the basis of four MoMA exhibitions since the mid-1990s, including Scorsese Collects and, most recently, a twopart series featuring new restorations from Republic Pictures.

As Rajendra Roy, MoMA’s Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, put it, “From his unextinguishable drive to innovate as a filmmaker to his passion for film history and his personal advocacy for film literacy, Martin Scorsese is cinema’s greatest hero. He is a universe unto himself, and all of us who are privileged to work in his orbit are nurtured by his considerable force. He is a loyal and dear part of The Museum of Modern Art family, and we are happy to welcome him home once again.”

Organized by the Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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The Contenders 2018

November 08, 2018–January 08, 2019

 

The Museum of Modern Art announces its selection of the boldest films of 2018 for the 11th year of The Contenders, running November 8, 2018, through January 8, 2019. MoMA’s annual end-of-year series offers audiences the unique opportunity to peer behind the industry curtain, with special presentations that often feature revealing post-screening conversations with filmmakers and actors. Tickets for the MoMA screenings go on sale two weeks prior to each screening at 9:30 a.m. at The Museum of Modern Art and online at moma.org/contenders.

Opening the series at the Museum on November 8 is Steve McQueen’s Widows (2018), a blistering, modern-day thriller set against a backdrop of crime, passion, and corruption. Widows  is the story of four women with nothing in common except a debt left behind by their dead husbands’ criminal activities. Oscar winner Viola Davis leads a knockout ensemble of women who take their fate into their own hands and conspire to forge a future on their own terms. Director Steve McQueen and Producer Iain Canning will be present for a post-screening discussion on opening night.

A full screening schedule can be found here.

Organized by the Department of Film.

Media Sponsorship is provided by The Hollywood Reporter.

The presentation is supported by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Silent Comedy International

November 23, 2018–December 02, 2018

 

Film historians tend to treat early European film comedy and the American style of slapstick as two independent traditions, but in fact there was a great deal of bilateral trade being conducted during the silent era. The prolonged chases and bizarre visual gags of turn-of-the-century French comedies directly influenced American producers like Mack Sennett, while Hollywood’s genius for creating vivid star personalities found its reflection in Europe’s feature-length comedies of the 1920s. Certain comedy creators and performers, like Max Linder, Marcel Perez, and Leonce Perret, were busy cross-pollinators, working on both continents and using the best of both traditions.

Another important factor was the onslaught of British comics in American films following the huge success of Charlie Chaplin. Producers, eager to hop on the Chaplin gravy train, sought out performers with similar English stage backgrounds, and created the original “British Invasion” of American popular culture. The expressive pantomime and knockabout gags of the English music hall tradition quickly took root in Hollywood slapstick and, thanks to trans-fertilization, soon ended up in French, Italian, and German films.

By tracing the circulation of comic styles, this series suggests that the European and American silent comedies share a common ancestry and a common aim: laughter without borders.

A full screening schedule can be found here.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, and Brittany Shaw, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and independent curators Steve Massa and Ben Model.

The organizers wish to thank Robert Arkus, Association Chaplin, BFI, Eileen Bowser, Serge Bromberg, Rob Byrne, CNC, Rachel Del Gaudio, EYE Filmmuseum, The Library of Congress, Lobster Films, Mike Mashon, Elif Rongen-Kaynakci, San Francisco Silent Film Festival, Lynanne Schweighhofer, the late Charles Silver, Rob Stone, and Undercrank Productions.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Ugo Tognazzi: Tragedies of a Ridiculous Man

December 05, 2018–December 30, 2018

 

The great Italian actor, director, and screenwriter Ugo Tognazzi (1922–1990) was among the inimitable quintet of actors from Italian cinema’s golden age—Tognazzi, Marcello Mastroianni, Vittorio Gassman, Alberto Sordi, and Nino Manfredi—who invented and popularized commedia dell’Italia, that tragicomic admixture of folly and melancholy, and commanded the lion’s share of Italy’s box-office receipts in the 1960s and ’70s. Tognazzi’s career began opposite Raimondo Vianello in satirical sketch comedies of fledgling 1950s Italian television—his gifts of impersonation and improvisation are hilariously on display in films like Dino Risi’s I mostri (1963) and Luigi Zampa’s A Question of Honor (1965)—and deepened as his roles in later years became more acidic and introspective. If a typical Tognazzi character was virile and dissolute, sweet-talking his way into beds, executive offices, and corridors of power, he was also confronted with the sinking awareness of his own mortality. One witnesses in this retrospective, then, a man’s seemingly inexorable passage from brash ambition to bitter regret, a man seeking to preserve his dignity in the face of diminishing prowess.

In collaboration with Luce Cinecittà, Rome, MoMA celebrates Tognazzi with a retrospective that spans his four-decade career. The series features 25 of his nearly 150 films, including his unforgettable, award-winning performances in Luciano Salce’s The Fascist (1961), Carlo Lizzani’s La Vita agra (1964), Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Porcile(1969), Marco Ferreri’s La Grande Bouffe (1973), Elio Petri’s Property Is No Longer a Theft (1973), Mario Monicelli’s Amici miei (1975), Édouard Molinaro’s La Cage aux folles(1978) and Bernardo Bertolucci’s Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man (1981).

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, and Camilla Cormanni and Paola Ruggiero, Luce Cinecittà.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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The Value of Good Design

February 10, 2019–May 27, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Featuring objects from domestic furnishings and appliances to ceramics, glass, electronics, transport design, sporting goods, toys, and graphics, The Value of Good Design explores the democratizing potential of design, beginning with MoMA’s Good Design initiatives from the late 1930s through the 1950s, which championed well-designed, affordable contemporary products. The concept of Good Design also took hold well beyond the Museum, with governments on both sides of the Cold War divide embracing it as a vital tool of social and economic reconstruction and technological advancement in the years following World War II. This global scope is reflected in many of the items on view, from a mass-market Italian Fiat Cinquecento automobile and a Soviet-era East German Werra camera to a Japanese Sony television and a Brazilian bowl chair. These works join both iconic and unexpected items made in the US, such as the Eames La Chaise, a Chemex Coffee Maker, and Irwin Gershen’s Shrimp Cleaner.

The exhibition also raises questions about what Good Design might mean today, and whether values from mid-century can be translated and redefined for a 21st-century audience. Visitors are invited to judge for themselves by trying out a few “good design” classics still in production, and exploring how, through its design stores, MoMA continues to incubate new products and ideas in an international marketplace.

Organized by Juliet Kinchin, Curator, and Andrew Gardner, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

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Joan Miró: Birth of the World

February 24, 2019–July 06, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Joan Miró: Birth of the World, an exhibition that explores the development of Miró’s pictorial universe, with particular emphasis on his intense engagement with poetry, the creative process, material experimentation, and the seen and unseen world. This focused exhibition, drawn from MoMA’s unrivalled Miró collection and augmented by several key loans, situates his monumental painting, The Birth of the World (1925), in relation to other key works by the artist, which are rarely shown together. On view from February 24 through July 6, 2019, the exhibition includes approximately 60 paintings, works on paper, prints, illustrated books, collages, and objects primarily made between 1920, the year of Miró’s first catalytic trip to Paris, and the early 1950s, when his unique visual language gained international acclaim.

The Museum of Modern Art’s collection of Miró’s works constitutes one of the finest and most comprehensive in the world. In 1941, MoMA organized the first major museum retrospective of Miró’s work, followed by others in 1959 and 1993, the centennial of the artist’s birth. The Museum has also presented focused exhibitions, most recently Joan Miró: Painting and Anti-Painting 1927–1937 (2008), which explored a single, transformative decade in Miró’s long career. The present exhibition extends the Museum’s commitment to Miró by offering for examination and reassessment an in-depth presentation of his works from the collection.

The exhibition is organized by Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Senior Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century

March 17, 2019–June 23, 2019

 

The Museum of Modern Art announces New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century, on view from March 17 through June 23, 2019. Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition includes works made since the turn of the millennium that push the boundaries of technology: upending systems, twisting materials, and inventing novel techniques and forms. The exhibition explores the ways in which technological processes are still stubbornly tied to the physical world—mired in matter, friction, and breakdown. 

With a number of recent acquisitions and large-scale installations never before shown at the Museum, the exhibition showcases a diverse range of techniques and media, from live digital simulation to 3-D printing, magnetic resonance imaging, industrial vacuum-formed plastic, and ultrasound gel. Among the featured artists in the exhibition are Josephine Pryde (born 1967, United Kingdom), Anicka Yi (born 1971, South Korea), Seth Price (born 1973, East Jerusalem), and Basim Magdy (born 1977, Egypt). Their art revels in the weird and unexpected, giving rise to hybrid constellations of things, bodies, and data.

New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century is organized by Michelle Kuo, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern

March 17, 2019–June 30, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art announces Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern, an exhibition exploring Lincoln Kirstein’s sweeping contributions to American cultural life in the 1930s and ’40s, on view from March 17 through June 30, 2019. Best known for co-founding the New York City Ballet, Kirstein (1907–1996), a polymathic writer, curator, editor, impresario, tastemaker, and patron, was also a key figure in MoMA’s early history. With his prescient belief in the role of dance within the museum, his championing of figuration in the face of prevailing abstraction, and his position at the center of a New York network of queer artists, intimates, and collaborators, the impact of this extraordinary individual remains profoundly resonant today. Seen through the lens of Kirstein, the works in the exhibition reveal an alternative and expansive view of modern art.

Kirstein proclaimed, “I have a live eye,” and the exhibition illuminates the influence of his vision, tastes, and efforts on the Museum’s collecting, exhibition, and publication history. Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern features more than 200 works from the Museum’s collection—set and costume designs for the ballet by Paul Cadmus and Jared French, photographs by Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, realist and magic realist paintings by Honoré Sharrer and Pavel Tchelitchew, sculpture by Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, and the Latin American art that Kirstein acquired for the Museum by artists such as Antonio Berni and Raquel Forner—alongside material drawn from the Museum Archives.

Organized by Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator, and Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

 

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Simone Fattal

March 31, 2019–September 02, 2019

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition in the United States of the work of Simone Fattal (Lebanese and American, b.1942). The retrospective will bring together a selection of over 100 works created over the last 40 years, featuring abstract and figurative ceramic sculptures, paintings, and collages that draw from a range of sources including war narratives, landscape painting, ancient history, mythology, and Sufi poetry. The exhibition will explore the impact of displacement, as well as the politics of archeology and excavation, as these themes resonate across Fattal’s multifaceted artistic practice.

Simone Fattal is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1.

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