Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Ladies Must Love. E.A. Dupont. 1933. USA

Son of Universal: More Rediscovered Gems from the Laemmle Years

May 05, 2017–May 16, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Following last summer’s monthlong series Universal Pictures: Restorations and Rediscoveries, MoMA presents another selection of extremely rare films produced during the risk-taking reign of studio head Carl Laemmle, Jr. Work to be screened includes Tod Browning’s ferocious 1930 gangster film Outside the Law, starring a pre–Little Cesar Edward G. Robinson; Tay Garnett’s stylistically audacious allegory Destination Unknown (1931); E. A. Dupont’s risqué Broadway romp Ladies Must Love (1933), and two programs of long-unseen, newly restored musical and comedy shorts, assembled by guest curator Ron Hutchinson of the Vitaphone Project. For individual film listings, visit moma.org/film.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

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Kokoa. 1985. Niger. Directed by Moustapha Alassane.

Moustapha Alassane, Pioneer of the Golden Age of Nigerien Cinema

May 12, 2017–May 15, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

This first North American retrospective of Moustapha Alassane (1942–2015), a pioneer of populist cinema in newly independent Niger in the 1960s and 1970s, is presented in association with La Cinematheque Afrique de l’Institut français. A fabulist who sheathed the sharp sting of his political satire within playful stories of water genies, pugilistic frogs, cowboys, and brave fishermen, Alassane parodied colonialist attitudes toward black Africans, the corrupt despotism of local officials, and the shallow materialism of Niger’s youth in a series of animated, fictional, and ethnographic films that remain beloved and influential even today. The lure of cinema, with its magical play of shadow and light, inspired Alassane to give up his career as a mechanic and turn toward making art for the masses. His earliest animated films were simple projections of cardboard cutouts, but his work quickly matured, leading to friendships and collaborations with Zalia Souley, the dean of Nigerien movie acting, and the French documentarian Jean Rouch and the Canadian animator Norman McLaren. Alassane’s films are vital and imaginative records of Nigerien traditions and rituals: his first feature, Aoure (1962), presents the married life of a young Zharma (ethnic Muslim) couple on the banks of the Niger River; his 1973 film Shaki documents the ascension of a Yoruban king and the syncretic intermingling of traditional customs and beliefs with those of Islam and Protestantism. All films are from Niger, directed by Moustapha Alassane, and in French and Hausa with English subtitles, unless otherwise noted. 

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, with Amélie Garin-Davet, French Embassy in New York. Special thanks to Mathieu Fournet.

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MoMA Presents Lynn Hershman Leeson’s Tania Libre

May 18, 2017–May 24, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Following its successful premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year, MoMA presents a weeklong theatrical run of Lynn Hershman Leeson’s Tania Libre (2017). Hershman Leeson’s documentary centers on the Cuban artist Tania Bruguera, who, in late 2014, in the weeks following Raul Castro’s and Barak Obama’s public commitments to renew diplomatic ties between Cuba and the US, was repeatedly questioned and placed under house arrest by the Castro government for staging a “treasonous” art performance in Havana’s Plaza of the Revolution. An international outpouring of support helped bring about Bruguera’s release, but other Cuban artists, dissidents, and journalists still remain in prison for subversive acts both real and imagined.

So much of Tania Bruguera’s art and activism has been a response to living under a repressive dictatorship. Tania Libre approaches this subject in a fascinating and novel way, following a therapy session in which Bruguera and Dr. Frank Ochberg, a pioneer in the study of post-traumatic stress, explore the psychological and physical effects of her interrogations and her family past. In Hershman Leeson—whose work is in MoMA’s collection and who was recently awarded the Golden Gate Persistence of Vision Award at the San Francisco Film Festival—Bruguera has found a portraitist who has dedicated more than four decades of radically innovative filmmaking and art to issues of identity, memory, surveillance, and censorship. On May 18 , Robyn Hullihan, Interim Executive Director of the Trust for Trauma Journalism, joins Hershman Leeson in introducing the opening-night screening of Tania Libre.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

Tania Libre. 2017. USA. Produced, directed, and edited by Lynn Hershman Leeson. With Tania Bruguera, Dr. Frank Ochberg. Courtesy Hotwire Productions, San Francisco. In Spanish, English; English subtitles. 73 min.

Thursday, May 18, 4:30 (introduced by Hershman Leeson and Robyn Hullihan, Trust for Trauma Journalism); Friday, May 19, 6:30; Saturday, May 20, 3:00; Sunday, May 21, 5:00; Monday, May 22, 4:00; Tuesday, May 23, 4:00; Wednesday, May 24, 6:30. T2

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Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends

May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. View a video of the remarks.

In 1959, Robert Rauschenberg wrote, “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. (I try to act in that gap between the two.)” His work in this gap shaped artistic practice for decades to come.

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Acclaimed artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas is collaborating on the exhibition’s design to foreground Rauschenberg’s work with dance and performance. MoMA’s presentation is structured as an “open monograph”—as other artists came into Rauschenberg’s creative life, they come into the exhibition, mapping the exchange of ideas. These figures include Trisha Brown, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Sari Dienes, Jasper Johns, Billy Klüver, Paul Taylor, David Tudor, Cy Twombly, Susan Weil, and many others.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition design was created in collaboration with the artist Charles Atlas.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Robert Rauschenberg.

The exhibition is supported at Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by Glenn and Eva Dubin, The Dana Foundation, Donald B. Marron, the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund, Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, Mrs. Ronnie F. Heyman, Helen and Charles Schwab, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III in honor of Jerry I. Speyer, and by Tiffany & Co.

Generous funding is provided by west elm.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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Projects 106: Martine Syms

May 27, 2017–July 16, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

Projects 106: Martine Syms, the first US solo museum exhibition by Martine Syms (b. 1988, Los Angeles), is an immersive installation including photographs and staged objects, and centering around a new feature-length film, Incense Sweaters & Ice.

Shot on location in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, Incense Sweaters & Ice follows three protagonists—Mrs. Queen Esther Bernetta White, Girl, and WB (“whiteboy”)—as they navigate dramas of surveillance, moving between watching, being watched, and remaining unseen. Accompanying the film is a suite of photographs sized to standard American movie posters and a metal mesh structure inspired by the geographies of the Great Migration.

Using video and performance, Syms examines representations of blackness and its relationship to narrative, vernacular, feminist thought, and radical traditions. Her artwork has been exhibited and screened extensively, including presentations at the Berlin Biennale, Manifesta 11, ICA London, The Hammer Museum, the New Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Initiated by MoMA in 1971 as a platform for new and experimental art, the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series, now presented at both The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1, provides a forum for the most urgent international voices in contemporary art. Projects 106: Martine Syms will be accompanied by an illustrated brochure. On the occasion of her exhibition, Syms will premiere a new lecture-performance as part of MoMA’s educational programming.

Projects 106: Martine Syms is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to Brent Freaney at Special—Offer.

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A New Golden Age: Contemporary Philippine Cinema

June 01, 2017–June 25, 2017

 

MoMA presents a survey of Philippine cinema from around 2000 to the present, a period known as the Third Golden Age of Philippine cinema (following the first golden age, in the 1950s, and the second, from the 1970s to the early 1980s). The Philippines’ current wave of sustained creativity is unusual in its diversity of genre and style, audacious formal experimentation, and multiplicity of personal/social/political perspectives. Defying simple description, this dizzying array of distinct cinematic statements makes it an exceptionally unique, vibrant movement. From Lav Diaz’s minimalist tales rendered at epic lengths or Brillante Mendoza’s gritty realist portrayals of the margins of society, to Raya Martin’s experimentation with storytelling and form, Ditsi Carolino’s stark documentaries following the disenfranchised, and Erik Matti’s riveting thrillers, contemporary Filipino filmmakers are pushing cinematic boundaries and heating up the global film scene.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Tess Rances and Vicky Belarmino of Cinemalaya, Gil Quito, Huei-Yin Chen, and intern Dalin Liu.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Modern Matinees: Becoming Jennifer Jones

June 01, 2017–June 30, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Phylis Lee Isley was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1919 to parents who operated a traveling tent show. Isley’s education extended to Northwestern University and the American Academy for Dramatic Arts in New York City, where she met actor and future husband Robert Walker in 1939. Before Hollywood called, Isley and Walker returned to Tulsa to find steady work on radio programs. When the couple finally arrived in Hollywood, there was limited work, with stardom years away.

Ready to return to the theater, Isley auditioned at the New York offices of David O. Selznick for an out-of-town run of Rose Franken’s comedy Claudia. Insecure and inexperienced, she left the producer’s office distraught and unaware that Selznick—who had purchased the film rights to the play—had overheard her audition. In short order, he offered Isley a movie contract with his production company.

Ever the genius producer, Selznick took control of Isley’s nascent career, transforming her into “Jennifer Jones.” What Jones needed next was a prominent role in a high profile picture, and The Song of Bernadette (1943) could not have been a more ideal showcase for her metamorphosis. When Jones was cast as the peasant girl who has visions of the Virgin Mary, Selznick kept her away from the press, photographers, and, legend has it, the film’s premiere, in order to retain the illusion of her youth, chastity, and inscrutability. The newly minted Jennifer Jones walked away with that year’s Best Actress Oscar.

King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946) was another defining moment. Cast as a Native American/Caucasian woman who enters the lives of two brothers living on a remote Arizona ranch, Jones was uneasy about her character’s brazen sexuality—as were the censors. Nonetheless, the film went on to great success and earned Jones another of her five Academy Award nominations.

Becoming Jennifer Jones, our glimpse at the evolution of a great American actress, features a selection of films drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Inbox: Charles Atlas: The Illusion of Democracy

June 03, 2017–August 13, 2017

Exhibition Galleries, Second Floor

Throughout his forty-year career, the groundbreaking filmmaker and video artist Charles Atlas (American, born 1949) has collaborated with key figures from a range of creative disciplines, expanding the relationships between visual art, dance, music, theater, and television. In the late 1970s, together with the choreographer Merce Cunningham, Atlas pioneered “media-dance,” in which dance works were created and performed specifically for the camera. Atlas’s experimental narrative works from the 1980s integrate fiction and documentary with vibrant, stylized portraits of urban subcultures.

With his trilogy The Illusion of Democracy (2008–12), Atlas has abandoned the presence of human bodies in favor of numerical figures, animating a constantly expanding and contracting universe based on six digits. Casting 1 through 6 as the protagonists of these intricately choreographed video installations, Atlas pushes the limits of their “numberness” and evokes the pervasiveness of mathematical algorithms in our increasingly technologized society. In Plato’s Alley (2008), pulsing vertical and horizontal white lines take shape as a grid populated by the ensemble, and in Painting by Numbers (2011), a sea of digits swells and subsides over six acts that culminate in a climactic finale. In 143652 (2012), bars of color slowly yet relentlessly scan back and forth, at once erasing and transforming each figure. With its methodical abstraction and politically suggestive title, the trilogy is an introspective study in order and chaos.    

Charles Atlas has collaborated on the design of the exhibition Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, currently on view in the fourth-floor Collection Galleries.

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Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, June 8, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow in theater. Watch video of the remarks.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise nearly 400 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, and photographs, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Beyond the Frame: International Cinema by Magnum Photographers

June 24, 2017–July 01, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Magnum Photos, established in 1947 by Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and others as an independent cooperative of photographers, has produced some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. On the occasion of Magnum’s 70th anniversary, this program explores the agency’s rich relationship to cinema through the lens of travelogues and art films. The artists represented here used moving images as an extension or counterpart to their photographic work to develop personal and auteurist storytelling. Expanding on the agency’s transatlantic history, Beyond the Frame spotlights work centered on Africa, Latin America, the US, and Europe, from the 1960s to the present. Photojournalism, fiction, and avant-garde media are alternately at play in the diverse treatments of conflict, social issues, and everyday moments. With selections from the agency’s Magnum Eye (1991–93) and Magnum in Motion (2004–today) initiatives, the series also investigates the technological and artistic transition from narrative cinema to video, and finally, to contemporary creators operating in a hybrid and online media field. Born out of the Second World War, Magnum’s vibrant and independent platform is as essential as ever, allowing both the social role and transcendent artistic quality of images to flourish.

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Magnum Photos and Susan Meiselas.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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