Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Bodys Isek Kingelez: City Dreams

May 26, 2018–January 01, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

“Without a model, you are nowhere. A nation that can’t make models is a nation that doesn’t understand things, a nation that doesn’t live,” said visionary artist Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015). Based in then-Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo), following its independence from Belgium, Kingelez made sculptures of imagined buildings and cities that reflected dreams for his country, his continent, and the world. Kingelez’s “extreme maquettes” offer fantastic, utopian models for a more harmonious society of the future. An optimistic alternative to his own experience of urban life in his home city of Kinshasa, which grew exponentially and organically with urban planning and infrastructure often unable to keep step, his work explores urgent questions around urban growth, economic inequity, how communities and societies function, and the rehabilitative power of architecture—issues that resonate profoundly today.

Kingelez’s vibrant, ambitious sculptures are created from an incredible range of everyday materials and found objects—colored paper, commercial packaging, plastic, soda cans, and bottle caps—all meticulously repurposed and arranged. While he didn’t travel outside of Zaire until 1989, he was highly attuned to world events and deeply concerned with social issues. The Scientific Center of Hospitalisation the SIDA (1991), for example, references the AIDS crisis; Palais d’Hirochima (1991) addresses the condtion of postwar Japan; and U.N. (1995) attests to the organization’s global peacekeeping efforts and the artist’s own sense of civic responsibility. In the complex multi-building cityscape Kimbembele Ihunga (1994), the artist reimagines his agricultural home village complete with a soccer stadium, banks, restaurants, and skyscrapers. In Ville Fantôme (1996), which will be accompanied by a Virtual Reality experience for visitors, the artist has imagined a peaceful city in which doctors and police are not needed.

The first US retrospective of Kingelez’s work, the exhibition spans his full career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. These rarely shown works are a call for us all to imagine, in the artist’s words, a “better, more peaceful world.”

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Exhibition design is produced in collaboration with the artist Carsten Höller.

Special thanks to Jean Pigozzi and CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection.

The exhibition is made possible by Allianz, a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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MoMA Presents: Anand Patwardhan’s Jai Bhim Comrade

June 01, 2018–June 07, 2018

 

Over his 47-year career, Anand Patwardhan (b.1950) has secured a reputation as one of India’s most independent, fearless filmmakers—one for whom cinema is a form of political engagement. In his award-winning documentary Jai Bhim Comrade, the 1997 police shooting of Dalits (formerly branded “untouchables”) at Ramabai Colony in Mumbai triggers a narrative about caste discrimination in contemporary India set against the modern legacy of Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar, the 20th-century reformer and legal scholar who also drafted India’s constitution. Shot over 14 years, Jai Bhim Comrade examines the persistent social and legal persecution of Dalit communities, as well as the poetry and music of Dalit resistance.

Organized by Prajna Desai, C-MAP Research Fellow for Asia, Department of Architecture and Design.

 

Friday, June 16:30 p.m., T1
Saturday, June 22:00 p.m., T2. Followed by a discussion with the filmmaker.
Sunday, June 32:00 p.m., T1
Monday, June 42:30 p.m., T2
Tuesday, June 56:30 p.m., T2
Wednesday, June 67:00 p.m., T1
Thursday, June 76:00 p.m., T1
 
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Reza Abdoh

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first major retrospective of pioneering theater director and playwright Reza Abdoh (Iranian-American, 1963–95), who was one of the most compelling figures in American experimental theater when he died of AIDS-related complications in 1995 at only 32 years old. Abdoh’s provocative and challenging work confronted the humanitarian catastrophe of the AIDS epidemic and the culture wars of the Reagan era, investigating a range of urgent social issues that remain equally relevant today, including those surrounding sexual orientation, gender, race, class, and privilege.

Co-organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy for Bidoun. The exhibition is co-produced with the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, where it will be presented from February 2 to April 29, 2019 and organized in collaboration with Krist Gruijthuijsen, Director.

Body Armor

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

The four artists in Body Armor—Maryam Hoseini, Zadie Xa, Delilah Montoya, and Ana Pellicer—present approaches to bodily adornment in contemporary life, placing focus on the garments and objects we wear to signal belonging, confer status, or project strength. Wearable ornaments have distinguished their owners for centuries across global cultures, embellishing appearance, granting access, and enhancing power. These distinctive markers allow individuals to move fluidly through a range of identities, operating as instruments of social influence that participate in a shared cultural language predicated on existing hierarchies and stereotypes.

Body Armor reimagines these adornments, and critiques the traditional, often colonial, contexts in which they are deployed. Pushing the boundaries of how we construe femininity across a range of cultures, geographies, and generations, these four artists trace the various ways these symbols work both in public and private space to define features of our cultural life, sense of self, social rankings, and communities.

Body Armor is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

 

This recent series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) depicts magnified details of human skin in high resolution, bearing only the first names of the people who served as the artist’s models. Presented as a discrete installation, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Using a robotic camera typically deployed for scientific research or forensic study, Price captured thousands of high-definition images in a single sitting, focusing on a specific area such as the arm or leg. The resulting images were subsequently stitched together using satellite-imaging software, run through a 3D graphics program, and adjusted by a fashion retoucher. Printed on fabric and stretched over commercial light boxes, these digital skins take on an inner light, fusing human warmth with a screen-like glow.

Since the mid-2000s, Price’s work has been celebrated for its reflection of the cultural, political, and economic conditions of this new century through the use of disparate image formats, fashion, music, commercial packaging, and advertising applications. Less noted is the connection that much of his art has to the body. Whether invoking it through violent media images, sexual cartoons, casts, clothing, or sewage pipes, Price returns repeatedly to the body as the site where technology’s effects register most acutely, if mysteriously. Combining the crisp detail of close observation with the impersonal breadth afforded by panoramic view, the photographs presented here provide uncannily intimate representations that nevertheless reveal very little about their models.

Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

 

Since the 1970s, Sue Coe (British and American, b. 1951) has worked at the juncture of art and activism to expose injustices and abuses of power. Protesting various forms of exploitation and violence, she tackles issues of sexism, racism, economic inequality, xenophobia, and animal cruelty. Graphic Resistance highlights these concerns in a selection of drawings, prints, and large-scale collages, as well as illustrations that Coe produced for newspaper opinion pages.

Art’s persuasive power has long been understood by rulers and rebels alike. Situated in a lineage of socially-engaged artists from Francisco Goya and Käthe Kollwitz to Leon Golub, Coe harnesses this capacity in works that depict suffering to call her audiences to action. She challenges complacency by spotlighting subjects that are typically relegated to the margins of attention, demanding that the vulnerabilities she pictures be not simply seen, but felt. “Neutrality,” she has stated, is “no longer a position we can afford.”

The trajectory of Coe’s practice, which responds to current events, doubles as a history of sociopolitical issues and activist causes. The exhibition traces some of her concerns, beginning with a selection of works from the 1980s that address the societal and environmental effects of Reagan-era free market economic policy and social conservatism. It follows Coe’s concurrent advocacy for animal rights and passionate fight against industrialized slaughter—which remain among her primary targets today—and includes works that confront the first Gulf War, the devastations of Hurricane Katrina, and escalating xenophobia in recent politics.

Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Carte Blanche: Edgardo Cozarinsky on Argentine Cinema

June 06, 2018–June 24, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Celebrated Argentine author and filmmaker Edgardo Cozarinsky made his North American cinematic debut with Dot Dot Dot (1971) in the very first New Directors/New Films festival, in 1972. Cozarinsky returns to MoMA with a Carte Blanche selection that juxtaposes classic and contemporary Argentine cinema in fresh and provocative ways. For example, a 1930s musical drama paired with a subversive theater improvisation from the late 1960s, or a 1950s noir about a child murderer paired with a recent coming-of-age drama about a different form of child abuse.

In doing so, he sheds new light on Argentine cinema’s unique concerns and urgencies—whether political, sexual, or artistic—observing that “history is rewritten all the time, and film history is even more liable to reassessments, fallen idols, and heroes retrieved from obscurity. This series of Argentine films proposes an alternative to accepted film history, bringing into dialogue vintage and present- day titles that escape, hopefully, from the accepted pattern of Argentine history and not just of film history.” Cozarinsky will introduce many of the programs, together with the scholar and archivist Fernando Martín Peña.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film.

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MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art

June 09, 2018–October 07, 2018

The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

In partnership with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne will present MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art as part of its Winter Masterpieces series. MoMA at NGV will provide a unique survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s iconic collection. Consisting of approximately 200 key works, arranged chronologically into eight thematic sections, the exhibition will trace the development of art and design from late-19th-century urban and industrial transformation, through to the digital and global present.

The emergence of a “new art” at the turn of the 20th century will be represented by some of MoMA’s earliest acquisitions, including masterworks by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne as well as an architectural model by Le Corbusier featured in MoMA’s first architecture exhibition in 1932. Works by pioneering Cubist and Futurist artists, including Pablo Picasso and Umberto Boccioni, will appear alongside the radically abstracted forms present in graphic design, furniture, and textiles from the Bauhaus and in works by artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian. The surreal visual language of paintings by artists like Salvador Dalí and Frida Kahlo and the spontaneity and tactility advanced in works by prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Alexander Calder and Jackson Pollock will also be included.

Developments in art from the 1960s to the 1980s, from Minimalism through Postmodernism, will be explored through the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Sol LeWitt, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring, among others. Significant works of late 20th-century and early 21st century art and design, including major pieces by Kara Walker, Rineke Dijkstra, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson, Huang Yong Ping, Mona Hatoum, El Anatsui and Camille Henrot, will foreground ideas around cultural and national identity, and mobility in a globalized world. Tomohiro Nishikado’s pioneering computer game Space Invaders and Shigetaka Kurita’s original set of 176 emoji will further complement the discussion of contemporary topics.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria.

Organized by Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Juliet Kinchin, Curator of Modern Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Miranda Wallace, Senior Curator, International Exhibition Projects, NGV.

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Modern Matinees: Hitchcock/Truffaut, Fashionably Late

June 26, 2018–July 04, 2018

 

Since our regular Modern Matinees screenings take place early on weekdays, we’d like to offer this “redux” presentation for audiences that have been unable to attend. In June and July 2018 we present an encore selection from our Hitchcock/Truffaut program, featuring films discussed in Francois Truffaut’s landmark 1967 interviews with Alfred Hitchcock.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Young Architects Program 2018: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine

June 28, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

Hide & Seek by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of Arup, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard from June 28 through September 3, 2018. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s construction is a responsive, kinetic environment that features eight intersecting elements arrayed across the entirety of the MoMA PS1 courtyard. Hide & Seek serves as a temporary urban landscape for the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series.

Now in its 19th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues.

Inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city, Hide & Seek enables surprising connections throughout the adjoining courtyards of MoMA PS1 and the surrounding streets. Each of the horizontal structures contains two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors suspended from a frame. The mirrors move in the wind or with human touch, permitting dislocating views and unique spatial relationships across the space that foster unexpected interactions. As the vanishing points disappear into the depths of the mirrors, the illusion of space expands beyond the physical boundaries of the Museum and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside. In reference to these unpredictable gestures, the upper registers of the steel structure are filled with a cloud of mist and light, responding to the activity and life of Warm Up at night. Scriptive elements, including a runway and a large-scale hammock, invite visitors into performance and establish platforms for improvisation.