Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first comprehensive retrospective of the work of Carolee Schneemann (American, b. 1939) in the United States, bringing together over 300 works spanning her prolific six-decade career. As one of the most groundbreaking artists of the second half of the twentieth century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into the social construction of the female body and the sexual and cultural biases implicit in traditional art historical narratives have had an indelible impact on subsequent generations of artists.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings from the 1950s, charting their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s—which integrated found objects, mechanical elements, and painterly interventions. A central protagonist of New York City’s downtown avant-garde community, Schneemann explored hybrid art forms that culminated in experimental theater events. She was a co-founder of the innovative Judson Dance Theater and the first visual artist to choreograph for the ensemble. During this period, Schneemann began to position her own body in her work with the intent of performing the roles of “both image-maker and image.” Responding to representations of sexuality made predominantly from the perspective of male artists, Schneemann’s provocative pieces foregrounded her body in ways that challenged prevailing attitudes about female sexuality. In parallel, Schneemann’s outrage over the atrocities of the Vietnam War are starkly reflected in several of her works from the mid-1960s.

The exhibition grounds Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of her lifelong commitment to painting and action, tracing the early developments that would lead to her iconic performances and films from the 1960s and 1970s, through to her multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s exploring feminist iconography, intimacy, and personal loss, as well as political disasters, captivity, and the destruction of war.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting is organized by the Museum der Moderne Salzburg. The exhibition is curated by Sabine Breitwieser, Director, Museum der Moderne Salzburg; and consulting curator Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipolli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, New York; and organized at MoMA PS1 by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Major support is provided by Lonti Ebers.

Generous funding is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Cathy Wilkes

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first monographic exhibition of Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. On view from October 22, 2017 through March 11, 2018, the exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016.

Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures, and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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You Are Now One of Us: Film at Club 57

October 29, 2017–February 28, 2018

 

In conjunction with the Club 57 gallery exhibition, this series explores the films that took a central role in defining the club’s programming. Selected from actual Club 57 screening schedules, it spans horror, science fiction, musicals, psychedelia, 1960s mod, European art cinema, TV programs, artist’s cinema, and more. At the club, this unruly mix of genres took on new meaning through collective experience and active spectatorship against the backdrop of post-punk New York.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with John “Lypsinka” Epperson, guest curator.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

 
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Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

October 31, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 31, with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the public’s imagination around the world. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition examining the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of downtown New York’s seminal alternative space in full. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Club 57 is accompanied by three film series: You Are Now One Of Us: Film at Club 57, co-organized with guest curator and defining Club 57 artist John “Lypsinka” Epperson (October 29, 2017–February 2018); New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive (December 1, 2017–April 2018), and This Is Now: Film and Video After Punk 1978–1985, presented in spring 2018 in partnership with LUX and British Film Institute.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.

 

 

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Modern Matinees: The Coen Brothers

November 01, 2017–December 29, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Joel and Ethan Coen’s unexpected, often parodic twists on cinematic genres and historical events feature outrageous characters with offbeat regional accents and dubious work ethics. Which is ironic because the Coen brothers have worn many hats on set since their 1984 debut Blood Simple, which, like most of their subsequent films, was directed by Joel, produced by Ethan, and cowritten by the pair.

While their earlier films were twisted, injury-prone, identity-muddled capers in which characters are frequently mistaken for one another (see Raising Arizona, The Hudsucker Proxy,Fargo, and the ubiquitous The Big Lebowski), many later films, like The Man Who Wasn’t There, No Country for Old Men, and A Serious Man, have eschewed perverse comic ingredients in favor of melancholy character studies and examinations of human cruelty. This nimble dexterity across a range of genres has earned them legions of fans and plenty of award-season recognition, from Cannes to the Academy. All 35mm prints are drawn from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Julianne Moore: A Tribute

November 02, 2017–November 12, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Department of Film is thrilled to celebrate honoree Julianne Moore at MoMA’s 10th annual Film Benefit. Since her 1993 breakthrough in Robert Altman’s Short Cuts, Moore has made a career of portraying complex and often unraveling women, turning even her most ordinary scenes into transfixing character studies. At home in both Hollywood blockbusters and art house hits, her vulnerability on screen is singular.

Presented in conjunction with the Film Benefit, this small selection of films—including two from MoMA’s collection (The Kids Are All Right and Far from Heaven) along with masterworks like Safe and Magnolia—captures an actor in top form, exploring remarkable emotional depths.

Organized by Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film.

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From the Collection: Artists at Mid to Late Career

November 11, 2017–November 04, 2018

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

This presentation in the Museum’s fourth-floor collection galleries will focus exclusively on works made by artists in their mid to late careers. Spanning from the late 1960s to today, the installation chronicles the many years of sustained experimentation, daring invention, and thoughtful reconsideration that distinguish an individual artist’s career long after his or her breakthrough moment. Highlighting lesser-known works by prominent artists and key works by some less familiar names, Artists at Mid to Late Career provides another view of the history of art over the last half century. All works are drawn from MoMA’s collection, and includes examples by Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Maria Lassnig, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Wednesday, November 15, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

This is the first U.S. survey to encompass Stephen Shore’s entire career in photography, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms. This major exhibition tracks the artist from his wunderkind beginnings—works made when he was just 14 years old were acquired by Edward Steichen, the Director of the Department of Photography at MoMA, and he had a solo exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art when he was 23 years old—through his continual, restless interrogation of image making. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works, along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Shore (American, b. 1947) has worked with many formats and mediums of photography, and this gathering of hundreds of his works will allow for a fuller understanding of the diversity of his output. The exhibition will feature historic and recent prints of black-and-white and color photographs, books, periodicals, films, portfolios, and digital works, including many that have never been published or exhibited, from his Conceptual projects, the American Surfaces and Uncommon Places series, his landscapes of the 1980s, commissions, and his recent explorations of Israel and Ukraine.

Shore’s first survey in New York in 10 years, this exhibition will both establish the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argue for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator, with​ ​Kristen Gaylord,​ ​Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 
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New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive

December 01, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented as part of the Club 57 exhibition, this survey celebrates film and video created during New York’s post-punk period, including landmark examples of No Wave, Cinema of Transgression, and independent films that grew out of the East Village scene and were first exhibited in area venues like Club 57, New Cinema, Millennium, and others. The richly diverse artists working during the heyday of the downtown scene left a vibrant legacy of Super8 filmmaking; collaborative works that have resonance as neighborhood home movies; and cinema that engages auteurist and genre cinema traditions, or upends them completely. Many of the filmmakers will be present, and we will premiere a number of recent MoMA preservations of little-seen and iconic titles alike.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

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