Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

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Wim Wenders and Dennis Hopper during the production of Der amerikanische Freund (The American Friend, West Germany/France 1977) by Wim Wenders © Wim Wenders Stiftung 2014

Wim Wenders

March 02, 2015–March 17, 2015

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art celebrates filmmaker Wim Wenders (German, b. 1945) with a major career retrospective. This series is a cooperative venture with the Berlin International Film Festival—which dedicates its 2015 Homage to Wenders, presenting him with an Honorary Golden Bear award for lifetime achievement—and Deutsche Kinemathek—Museum for Film und Fernsehen.

MoMA’s retrospective of 21 feature films and numerous shorts captures the breadth of Wenders’s career, from his 16mm experimental works of the late 1960s—including Same Player Shoots Again (1968) and Silver City (1969)—to the New York premiere of his most recent film, The Salt of the Earth (2014). This documentary profile of the Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado won the Un Certain Regard Special Prize at the Cannes Film Festival and will be commercially released by Sony Pictures Classics on March 27, 2015.

Also presented are new digital restorations of some of Wenders’s most cherished fiction and nonfiction films: The Goalkeeper’s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick (1972); Alice in the Cities (1974); The American Friend (1977); Paris, Texas (1984); Tokyo-Ga (1985); Notebook on Cities and Clothes (1989); and the North American premiere of the full-length director’s cut of Until the End of the World (1991). The retrospective culminates with Wenders’s vibrant documentaries about music, dance, and filmmaking: Lightning over Water (1980), Die Gebrüder Skladanowsky (1995), Buena Vista Social Club (1999), The Soul of a Man (2003), and Pina (2011).

Wenders will introduce many of the screenings, and will also take part in an onstage conversation with his longtime collaborator Peter Handke, the Austrian author who coscripted 3 American LPs (1969), The Goalie’s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick (1972), False Move (1975), and Wings of Desire (1987), in a conversation moderated by Ian Buruma, whose latest book of essays is Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War (The New York Review of Books, 2014). The retrospective also premieres a new digital restoration of The Left-Handed Woman (1978), which Handke directed from his own novel and Wenders produced. IFC Center, with Janus Films, will present a selection of Wenders’ films in theatrical runs in Fall 2015.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, with Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, and Thomas Beard, independent curator.

Special thanks to Janus Films, Sony Pictures Classics, the Berlinale, and Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum for Film und Fernsehen.

Björk, Debut, 1993. Credit: Photography by Jean Baptiste Mondino. Image courtesy of Wellhart Ltd & One Little Indian

Björk

March 08, 2015–June 07, 2015

 

The Museum of Modern Art announces that it will present a full-scale retrospective dedicated to the multifaceted work of the composer, musician, and artist Björk in 2015. Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large at MoMA and Director of MoMA PS1, the exhibition Björk draws from more than 20 years of the artist’s daring and adventurous projects and her seven full-length albums—from Debut (1993) to Biophilia (2011)—to chronicle her career through sound, film, visuals, instruments, objects, costumes, and performance. The installation will present a narrative, both biographical and imaginatively fictitious, cowritten by Björk and the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón Sigurdsson. Björk’s collaborations with video directors, photographers, fashion designers, and artists will be featured, and the exhibition culminates with a newly commissioned, immersive music and film experience conceived and realized with director Andrew Thomas Huang and 3-D design leader Autodesk. Björk will be on view from March 7 through June 7, 2015; MoMA is the sole venue.

The exhibition is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America.

Major support is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

New Directors/New Films 2015

March 18, 2015–March 29, 2015

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters and Lincoln Center

Now in its 44th year, the renowned New Directors/New Films festival, presented jointly by The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, introduces New York audiences to the work of emerging or not-yet-established filmmakers from around the world.

Organized by a selection committee comprising Jytte Jensen, Curator; Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film; and Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Dennis Lim, Director of Programming; Marian Masone, Senior Programming Advisor, and Gavin Smith, Editor, Film Comment and Senior Programmer, the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

Rogelio Salmona. Torres del Parque Residencial Complex, Bogotá, Colombia, 1964-1970. Photograph: Leonardo Finotti © Leonardo Finotti

Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980

March 29, 2015–July 19, 2015

The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor

In 1955 The Museum of Modern Art staged Latin American Architecture since 1945, a landmark survey of modern architecture in Latin America. On the 60th anniversary of that important show, the Museum returns to the region to offer a complex overview of the positions, debates, and architectural creativity from Mexico and Cuba to the Southern Cone between 1955 and the early 1980s.

This period of self-questioning, exploration, and complex political shifts also saw the emergence of the notion of Latin America as a landscape of development, one in which all aspects of cultural life were colored in one way or another by this new attitude to what emerged as the “Third World.” The 1955 exhibition featured the result of a single photographic campaign, but Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980 brings together a wealth of original materials that have never before been brought together and, for the most part, are rarely exhibited even in their home countries.

The exhibition features architectural drawings, architectural models, vintage photographs, and film clips alongside newly commissioned models and photographs by Brazilian photographer Leonardo Finotti. While the exhibition focuses on the period of 1955 to 1980 in most of the countries of Latin America, it is introduced by an ample prelude on the preceding three decades of architectural developments in the region, presentations of the development of several key university campuses in cities like Mexico City and Caracas, and a look at the development of the new Brazilian capital at Brasilia. Architects met these challenges with formal, urbanistic, and programmatic innovation, much of it relevant still to the challenges of our own period, in which Latin America is again providing exciting and challenging architecture and urban responses to the ongoing issues of modernization and development, though in vastly different economic and political contexts than those considered in this major historical reevaluation.

The exhibition is accompanied by two major publications: a catalogue and an anthology of primary texts translated from Spanish and Portuguese.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, and Patricio del Real, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA; Jorge Francisco Liernur, Universidad Torcuato di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Carlos Eduardo Comas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; with the assistance of an advisory committee from across Latin America.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

 Additional funding is provided by The Reed Foundation and by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

 

Jacob Lawrence. The Migration Series. 1940-41. Panel 1: “During the World War there was a great migration North by Southern Negros.” Casein tempera on hardboard, 18 x 12" (45.7 x 30.5 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C. Acquired 1942. © 2015 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

One-Way Ticket: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Other Visions of the Great Movement North

April 03, 2015–September 07, 2015

 

The Museum of Modern Art marks the centennial of the beginning of the Great Migration, the multi-decade mass movement of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North, with the exhibition One-Way Ticket: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Other Visions of the Great Movement North from April 3 through September 7, 2015. The show highlights the ways in which Lawrence and others in his circles developed a set of innovative artistic strategies to offer perspectives on this crucial episode in American history. An extensive program of public events, performances, digital resources, and publications that underscore the movement’s transformative impact on American culture, politics, and society will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition. One-Way Ticket is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., in collaboration with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a division of the New York Public Library.

One-Way Ticket reunites all 60 panels of Lawrence’s Migration Series at MoMA for the first time in 20 years, and includes other accounts of the movement in a broad variety of media, including novels and poems by writers such as Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Wright; music by Josh White, Duke Ellington, and Billie Holiday; photographs by Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Gordon Parks, and Robert McNeill; sociological tracts by Carter Woodson, Charles Johnson, Emmett J. Scott, and Walter White; and paintings by Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, and Charles White. The exhibition grounds Lawrence’s work within this rich context, shedding light on the ways in which he drew upon and transformed contemporary models for representing black history in America, and suggesting how the Migration Series functioned as an innovative form of political speech.

The exhibition at MoMA is organized Leah Dickerman, Curator, with Jodi Roberts, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture. The Phillips Collection will present an exhibition featuring the Migration Series in fall 2016, organized by Elsa Smithgall, Curator.

The MoMA presentation and accompanying initiatives are made possible by the Ford Foundation.

Major support is provided by The Museum of Modern Art’s Research and Scholarly Publications endowment established through the generosity of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Edward John Noble Foundation, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Bass, and the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Challenge Grant Program.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis, MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation, Karole Dill Barkley and Eric J. Barkley, and the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

Special thanks to The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation.

Cut Piece (1964) performed by Yoko Ono in New Works of Yoko Ono, Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, March 21, 1965. Photograph by Minoru Niizuma. ©Minoru Niizuma. Courtesy Lenono Photo Archive, New York

Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971

May 17, 2015–September 07, 2015

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery, sixth floor

The Museum of Modern Art presents its first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Yoko Ono, taking as its point of departure the artist’s unofficial MoMA debut in late 1971. At that time, Ono advertised her “one woman show,” titled Museum of Modern [F]art. However, when visitors arrived at the Museum there was little evidence of her work. According to a sign outside the entrance, Ono had released flies on the Museum grounds, and the public was invited to track them as they dispersed across the city. Now, over 40 years later, Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 surveys the decisive decade that led up to Ono’s unauthorized exhibition at MoMA, bringing together approximately 125 of her early objects, works on paper, installations, performances, audio recordings, and films, alongside rarely seen archival materials. A number of works invite interaction, including Painting to Be Stepped On (1960/1961) and Ono’s groundbreaking performance, Bag Piece (1964). The exhibition draws upon the 2008 acquisition of the Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Gift, which added approximately 100 of Ono’s artworks and related ephemera to the Museum’s holdings. Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1; and Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints; with Francesca Wilmott, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation, BNP Paribas, and The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional funding is provided by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

Grete Stern. Dreams No. 1. 1949. Gelatin silver print. 10 1/2 x 9" (26.6 x 22.9 cm). Latin American and Caribbean Fund through gift of Marie Josée and Henry R. Kravis in honor of Adriana Cisneros de Griffin. © 2014 Galería Jorge Mara-La Ruche

From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola

May 17, 2015–October 04, 2015

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor

From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola is the first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic. In Berlin in 1927, Stern began taking private classes with Walter Peterhans, who was soon to become head of photography at the Bauhaus. A year later, in Peterhans’s studio, she met Ellen (Rosenberg) Auerbach, with whom she opened a pioneering studio specializing in portraiture and advertising. Named after their childhood nicknames, the studio ringl + pit embraced both commercial and avant-garde loyalties, creating proto-feminist works. In Buenos Aires during the same period, Coppola initiated his photographic experimentations, exploring his surroundings and contributing to the discourse on modernist practices across media in local cultural magazines. In 1929 he founded the Buenos Aires Film Club to introduce the most advanced foreign films to Argentine audiences. His early works show a burgeoning interest in new modes of photographic expression that led him to the Bauhaus in 1932, where he met Stern and they began their joint history.

Following the close of the Bauhaus and the rising threat of the Nazi powers in 1933, Stern and Coppola fled Germany. Stern arrived first in London, where her friends included activists affiliated with leftist circles and where she made her now iconic portraits of German exiles. After traveling through Europe, camera in hand, Coppola joined Stern in London, where he pursued a modernist idiom in his photographs of the fabric of the city, tinged alternately with social concern and surrealist strangeness.

In the summer of 1935, Stern and Coppola embarked for Buenos Aires where they mounted an exhibition in the offices of the avant-garde magazine Sur, announcing the arrival of modern photography in Argentina. The unique character of Buenos Aires was captured in Coppola’s photographic encounters from the city’s center to its outskirts and in Stern’s numerous portraits of the city’s intelligentsia. The exhibition ends in the early 1950s, with Stern’s forward-thinking Sueños (Dreams), a series of photomontages she contributed to the popular women’s magazine Idilio, portraying women’s dreams with urgency and surreal wit.

The exhibition is accompanied by a major publication edited by Roxana Marcoci and Sarah Meister with a selection of original texts by Stern and Coppola translated into English by Rachel Kaplan. The catalogue will consist of three essays on the artists written by the exhibition curators and scholar Jodi Roberts.

Organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, and Sarah Meister, Curator, with Drew Sawyer, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and by The David Berg Foundation.
 
Additional funding is provided by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
Research and travel support was provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.
John Baldessari (American, born 1931). Hands Framing New York Harbor from Pier 18. 1971. Photograph by Shunk-Kender (Harry Shunk [German, 1924-2006] and János Kender [Hungarian, 1937-1983]). Gelatin silver print, 7 3/8 × 9 15/16" (18.8 × 25.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in honor of Jennifer Winkworth and Kynaston McShine and in memory of Harry Shunk and János Kender. © 2014 John Baldessari. Photograph: Shunk-Kender © J. Paul Getty Trust. The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles

Art on Camera: Photographs by Shunk-Kender, 1960–1971

May 17, 2015–October 04, 2015

The Robert and Joyce Menschel Photography Gallery, third floor

In 2013, The Museum of Modern Art acquired over 600 works from the Shunk-Kender Photography Collection as a gift of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. The donation established a consortium across five institutions—the Getty Research Institute, the National Gallery of Art, Centre Pompidou, Tate, and MoMA—that together received the full archive of photographic material by Harry Shunk (German, 1924–2006) and János Kender (Hungarian, 1937–1983), who worked collaboratively under the name Shunk-Kender from the late 1950s to the early 1970s.

This exhibition presents a selection of remarkable photographs by Shunk-Kender from the Museum’s collection, including five photographs of Yves Klein’s landmark work Leap into the Void (1960)—the iconic image that was published in Klein’s Dimanche-Le Journal d’un seul jour on November 27, 1960 (and distributed throughout Paris), along with four additional, and little-known, distinct views of the performance. Also featured are numerous photographs of Yayoi Kusama’s astonishing New York performances of 1968, including Mirror Performance—an ecstatic gathering of costumed, painted, and nude bodies within one of Kusama’s mirrored chambers—and multiple iterations of The Anatomic Explosion, in which dancers stripped and posed in front of the New York Stock Exchange and other Wall Street–area locations in an unconventional artistic protest against the Vietnam War.

A major portion of the exhibition is devoted to photographs from Pier 18. In 1971, a series of ephemeral artworks were executed at a derelict Hudson River pier in New York. Conceived and organized by Willoughby Sharp, the actions, instructions, and performances of Pier 18 were enacted in February and March of 1971 by 27 (all male) artists, including Vito Acconci, John Baldessari, Jan Dibbets, Gordon Matta-Clark, Mario Merz, and Allen Ruppersberg, among others. Sharp invited Shunk-Kender to collaborate with each artist to photograph the individual projects. From the start, Sharp conceived of the project as an installation, in which Shunk-Kender’s photographs would be the physical manifestation of the work experienced by an audience. Indeed, it was through Projects: Pier 18 (June 18–August 2, 1971)—an exhibition at MoMA that was part of the Museum’s experimental Projects series—that the public ultimately discovered and engaged with the Pier 18 artworks.

Without question, the roles played by the two photographers varied from one project to the next. On the pier, Baldessari used his hands to mimic the view of their camera, emphasizing the framing choices inherent in the composition. Merz, on the other hand, suggested to the photographers that they select and record images entirely of their own preference. The resulting Pier 18 pictures capture the chaotic energy, systematic processes, and playful wit of the era’s performance and Conceptual art in two-dimensional black and white.

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography

The exhibition is supported by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

Pier 54, an homage to Pier 18 organized by High Line Art, is on view through December 13 at 120 Eleventh Avenue.

Zoe Leonard (American, born 1961)
Chapter twenty from Analogue. 1998 2007
Three chromogenic color prints and one gelatin silver print, each 11 x 11" (27.9 x 27.9 cm). 
Acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, the Fund for the Twenty First Century, The Modern Women's Fund, and Carol Appel

Zoe Leonard: Analogue

June 27, 2015–August 30, 2015

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor

This exhibition presents Zoe Leonard’s Analogue—a landmark photographic project conceived over the course of a decade—which documents, in 412 color and black-and-white photographs, the eclipsed texture of 20th-century urban life as seen in little bodegas, mom-and-pop stores with decaying facades and quirky handwritten signs, and shop windows displaying a mixed assortment of products.

Shooting with a vintage 1940s Rolleiflex camera, a tool “left over from the mechanical age,” as Leonard puts it, the artist took her own neighborhood of New York’s Lower East Side as a point of departure. She then followed the global trade of recycled merchandise—used T-shirts, old-fashioned shoes, discarded Coke advertisements, the old technology of Kodak camera shops—to far-flung places in Eastern Europe, Africa, Cuba, and Mexico. Tapping the traditions of documentary and conceptual photography, Leonard’s project is positioned within the genealogy of the grand visual archives that extend from Eugène Atget’s Paris “then and now,” to August Sander’s Face of Our Time, to Bernd and Hilla Becher’s typologies of vernacular architecture.

The exhibition is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, Department of Photography.

The exhibition is made possible by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973) Bull. Cannes, c. 1958. Plywood, tree branch, nails, and screws. 46 1/8 x 56 3/4 x 4 1/8″ (117.2 x 144.1 x 10.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Jacqueline Picasso in honor of the Museum’s continuous commitment to Pablo Picasso’s art. © 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Picasso’s Sculpture

September 14, 2015–January 03, 2016

The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor

Picasso’s Sculpture is a sweeping survey of Pablo Picasso’s profoundly innovative and influential work in three dimensions. This will be the first such museum exhibition to take place in the United States in nearly half a century.

Over the course of his long career, Picasso devoted himself to sculpture wholeheartedly, if episodically, using both traditional and unconventional materials and techniques. Unlike painting, in which he was formally trained and through which he made his living, sculpture occupied a uniquely personal and experimental status in Picasso’s oeuvre. He approached the medium with the freedom of an autodidact, ready to break all rules. This attitude led him to develop a deep fondness for his sculptures to which the many photographs of his studios and homes bear witness. Treating them almost as members of his household, he cherished their company and enjoyed recreating them in a variety of materials and situations. Picasso kept the majority of them in his private possession during his lifetime. It was only in 1966, through the large Paris retrospective Hommage à Picasso, that the public became fully aware of this side of his oeuvre. Following that exhibition, in 1967 The Museum of Modern Art organized The Sculpture of Picasso, which remains the first and last exhibition on this continent to display a large number of the artist’s sculptures.

Picasso’s Sculpture focuses on the artist’s life-long engagement with this genre from the point of view of materials and processes. It features more than 100 sculptures, complemented by selected works on paper and photographs. The aim is to advance the understanding of what sculpture was for Picasso, and of how he revolutionized its history through a lifelong commitment to constant reinvention. The exhibition is organized in chapters corresponding to the distinct periods during which Picasso devoted himself to sculpture, each time exploring with fresh intensity the modern possibilities of this ancient art form.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with the Musée national Picasso – Paris. Organized by Ann Temkin, Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture, and Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Virginie Perdrisot, Curator of Sculptures and Ceramics at the Musée national Picasso – Paris.

The exhibition is supported by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.