Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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Lumen_night_JSS

Young Architects Program 2017: Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio

June 29, 2017–January 01, 1970

MoMA PS1

Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio has been named the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program. Opening on June 29 in the MoMA PS1 courtyard, this year’s construction is an immersive design that evolves over the course of a day, providing a cooling respite from the midday sun and a responsive glowing light after sundown. Drawn from among five finalists, Jenny Sabin Studio’s Lumen will serve as a temporary urban landscape for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Now in its 18th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling.

Made of responsive tubular structures in a lightweight knitted fabric, Lumen features a canopy of recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and deliver light. A misting system responds to visitors’ proximity, activating fabric stalactites that produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s multisensory environment is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure and materials transform throughout the day and night, adapting to the densities of bodies, heat, and sunlight.

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MoMA PS1’s Warm Up 2014 featuring Skrillex and iLoveMakonnen at MoMA PS1. Image courtesy of MoMA PS1. Photo by Charles Roussel.

Landmark 20th Season of Warm Up Begins July 1

July 01, 2017–September 02, 2017

 

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up celebrates its 20th season in 2017, with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music—both local and global—across a range of genres. Warm Up 2017 begins on Saturday, July 1 and runs through Saturday, September 2, featuring a to-be-announced lineup of emerging and established artists as part of an ambitious and wide-ranging program.

Advance tickets are now available for all Warm Up 2017 dates. In celebration of Warm Up’s founding year, MoMA PS1 will offer a special “1998” ticket package providing access to all ten dates for only $98, available for a limited time only. Full ticketing information can be found within the full press release, in the press kit section of this page, or at mo.ma/warmup .

Over its 20 seasons, Warm Up has featured more than 750 artists, including pop artists Solange, Jamie XX, and Grimes, experimental musicians Arca, Black Dice, and Four Tet, and legendary DJs like DJ Premier, Ritchie Hawtin, and Derrick May. One of the longest-running music programs within a museum, Warm Up has a history of supporting seminal artists before they come to prominence and providing a platform for experimentation, unique collaborations, and new material. 

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Performance still from Facets: A Recital Compilation by Terry Adkins, November 8, 2012 at the Arthur Zankel Music Center, Skidmore College. Photo: Patrick O'Rourke

Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), has an accumulative, rotating membership of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these “installation based experiences [issued] from an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” The Lone Wolf Recital Corps’ performances, which Adkins orchestrated with the collaborative improvisation of the Corps, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as John Brown, John Coltrane, Matthew Henson, Bessie Smith, and others.

Projects 107 will be the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. Conceived as a series of live performances by the reconstituted Corps, a changing group of artists will reprise selections from the group’s repertoire in an installation of Adkins’ sculptures. The exhibition will be supplemented by documentary video of earlier recitals, as well as performance props, costumes, and ephemera that trace the history of the Corps.

Projects 107 will bring together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians, including Sanford Biggers, Don Byron, Jean-Paul Bourelly, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Demetrius Oliver, Cavassa Nickens, Clifford Owens, Kamau Patton, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Robert Wisdom, Tukufu Zuberi, and others.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Spiral Woman. 2003. Drypoint and engraving. Sheet: 17 x 15" (43.2 x 38.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist. © 2017 The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, NY.

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries, and Floor Two, Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,400 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 220 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available now in process at moma.org/bourgeoisprints, and ultimately documenting over 4,600 printed sheets in all.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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White T-shirt. Image courtesy Shutterstock/SFIO CRACHO

Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Six, Exhibition Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the wide range of relationships between clothing and functionality, culture, aesthetics, politics, labor, economy, and technology in the exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern? In examining the ways in which wearable items are designed, manufactured, distributed, and used, the exhibition will present a selection of 111 examples of garments, footwear, and accessories that have had a strong impact on history and society in the 20th and 21st centuries, and continue to hold currency today. Comprised of examples as well-known, universal, and transformative as Levi’s 501 jeans and the bikini; as coveted as the Prada nylon backpack and the Hermès Birkin bag; and as culturally charged and historically rich as the Pashmina shawl, the dashiki, the kippah, and the keffiyeh, the exhibition will allow viewers to explore the influence of these items and their designers on Western culture over many decades.

Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition will present items along three tiers: archetype, stereotype, and prototype. In the installation, each item will be presented in the incarnation that made it significant in the last 100 (or so) years—the stereotype—accompanied by contextual material tracing back to its historical archetypes. In some cases, when innovation, opportunity, or necessity call for it, the item will be complemented by a new commission, or prototype. Thus, within the exhibition, designers, artists, scientists, engineers, and manufacturers will be invited to respond to some of these “indispensable items” with pioneering materials, approaches, and design revisions—extending this conversation into the near and distant future, and connecting the history of these garments with their present recombination and use.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at medium.com/items. The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at mo.ma/items. It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Carolee Schneemann. Up to and Including Her Limits. 1973-76.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

October 22, 2017–February 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. retrospective of the work of Carolee Schneemann, spanning the artist’s prolific six-decade career. As one of the most influential artists of the second part of the twentieth century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into subjectivity, the social construction of the female body, and the cultural biases of art history have had significant influence on subsequent generations of artists. Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings of the 1950s and their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s, which integrated objects, mechanical elements, and modes of deconstruction. In the late 1960s Schneemann began positioning her own body within her work, performing the roles of “both image and image-maker.” As a central protagonist of the New York downtown avant-garde community, she explored hybrid artistic forms culminating in experimental theater events. By tracing the developments that led to Schneemann’s groundbreaking innovations in performance, film, and installation in the 1970s, as well as her increasingly spatialized multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, the exhibition embeds Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of painting.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting is organized by the Museum der Moderne Salzburg. The exhibition is curated by Sabine Breitwieser, Director, Museum der Moderne Salzburg; and consulting curator Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipolli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, New York; and organized at MoMA PS1 by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Cathy Wilkes. Untitled. 2012. Gift of the Speyer Family Foundation and Mrs. Saidie A. May (by exchange). © 2017 Cathy Wilkes

Cathy Wilkes

October 22, 2017–February 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition in New York focused on Glasgow-based artist Cathy Wilkes (b. 1966), in conjunction with the inaugural Lassnig Art Prize. Since the start of her career in the 1990s, Wilkes has created sculptural tableaux that engage with the rituals of life. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child-rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, in which Wilkes’s art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences to reach beyond herself while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking.

Wilkes is the first artist to receive the Lassnig Art Prize, a biennial award established by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in June 2016 to honor the achievements of mid-career artists. The Lassnig Art Prize was originally envisioned by pioneering Austrian artist Maria Lassnig before her death in 2014 at the age of 94, at height of her artistic powers. Having achieved recognition only later in life, she hoped to encourage the efforts of fellow career artists not yet familiar to the public. In 2014, MoMA PS1 presented Maria Lassnig’s first comprehensive American museum survey to universal acclaim.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Acts of Live Art at Club 57. Pictured: Larry Ashton. 1980. Photograph by and courtesy Joseph Szkodzinski

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

October 31, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Galleries

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the public’s imagination around the world. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition examining the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of downtown New York’s seminal alternative space in full. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.

 

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Stephen Shore. West Ninth Avenue, Amarillo, Texas. October 2, 1974. Chromogenic color print, 17 × 21 3/4" (43.2 × 55.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of an anonymous donor. © 2017 Stephen Shore

Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

This is the first U.S. survey to encompass Stephen Shore’s career in photography, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms. This major exhibition tracks the artist from his wunderkind beginnings—works made when he was just 14 years old were acquired by Edward Steichen, the Director of the Department of Photography at MoMA, and he had a solo exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art when he was 24 years old—through his continual, restless interrogation of image making. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works, along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Shore (American, b. 1947) has worked with many formats and mediums of photography, and this gathering of hundreds of his works will allow for a fuller understanding of the diversity of his output. The exhibition will feature historic and recent prints of black-and-white and color photographs, books, periodicals, films, portfolios, and digital works, including many that have never been published or exhibited, from his Conceptual projects, the American Surfaces and Uncommon Places series, his landscapes of the 1980s, commissions, and his recent explorations of Israel and Ukraine.

Shore’s first survey in New York in 10 years, this exhibition will both establish the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argue for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont & Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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