Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). Two Masks (The Tomato) (Deux Masques [La Tomate]), 1947. Gouache on paper, cut and pasted. 18¾ x 20 3/8 (47.7 x 51.8 cm). Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Marron, New York. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs

October 12, 2014–February 08, 2015

The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

In the late 1940s, Henri Matisse turned increasingly to cut paper as his primary medium and scissors as his chief implement, introducing a radically new operation that came to be called a cut-out. Matisse would cut painted sheets into forms of varying shapes and sizes—from the vegetal to the abstract—which he then arranged into lively compositions, striking for their play with color and contrast, their exploitation of decorative strategies, and their economy of means. Initially, these compositions were of modest size but, over time, their scale grew along with Matisse’s ambitions for them, expanding into mural or room-size works. A brilliant final chapter in Matisse’s long career, the cut-outs reflect both a renewed commitment to form and color and an inventiveness directed to the status of the work of art, whether as a unique object, environment, ornament, or a hybrid of all of these.

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs is a groundbreaking reassessment of this important body of work. The largest and most extensive presentation of the cut-outs ever mounted, the exhibition includes approximately 100 cut-outs—borrowed from public and private collections around the globe—along with a selection of related drawings, illustrated books, stained glass, and textiles. The last time New York audiences were treated to an in-depth look at the cut-outs was in 1961.

This exhibition was sparked by an initiative to conserve The Museum of Modern Art’s monumental cut-out The Swimming Pool (1952), a favorite of visitors since its acquisition by MoMA in 1975. The Swimming Pool is the only cut-out composed for a specific room—the artist’s dining room in his apartment in Nice, France. The goals of the multiyear conservation effort have been to bring this magical environment back to its original color balance, height, and spatial configuration. Newly conserved, The Swimming Pool—off view at MoMA for more than 20 years—returns to MoMA’s galleries as a centerpiece of the exhibition.

With research on two fronts—conservation and curatorial—this exhibition offers a reconsideration of the cut-outs by exploring a host of technical and conceptual issues: the artist’s methods and materials and the role and function of the works in his practice; their environmental aspects; their sculptural and temporal presence as their painted surfaces exhibited texture and materiality, curled off the walls, and shifted in position over time; and their double lives, first as contingent and mutable in the studio and, ultimately, as permanent, a transformation accomplished via mounting and framing. The exhibition also mines the tensions that lurk in all the cut-outs, between finish and process, fine art and decoration, drawing and color.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, a children’s book, and education programs.

Henri Matisse: The Cutouts is organized by The Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with Tate Modern, London.

Organized at MoMA by Karl Buchberg, Senior Conservator, and Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator, with Samantha Friedman, Assistant Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs.

Major support for the MoMA presentation is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, and Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis.
 
Additional funding is provided by Dian Woodner, The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, and the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
Park Hyatt New York is the hotel sponsor of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs.

Media sponsorship is provided by theguardian.com.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

 

The Great Flood. 2013. USA. Directed by Bill Morrison. Courtesy of Bill Morrison.

Bill Morrison: Compositions

October 14, 2014–November 21, 2014

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Filmmaker Bill Morrison, who has spent more than two decades sourcing, and sometimes salvaging, archival footage in various states of decay and integrating them into his highly original film works, will have a mid-career retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art. Bill Morrison: Compositions, a comprehensive view of Morrison’s robust and diverse filmography, features more than two dozen shorts and feature films, including three special screenings with live musical performances: Spark of Being (2010), a retelling of the Frankenstein story, with composer Dave Douglas & Keystone; cellist Maya Beiser performing live with a program of Morrison’s short films, including Just Ancient Loops (2012) and All Vows (2013); and a closing-night presentation of Morrison’s epic retelling of the Mississippi River flood of 1927 in the feature-length film The Great Flood (2013), with a searing score composed by Bill Frisell, and featuring musicians Frisell, Ron Miles, Tony Scherr, and Kenny Wollesen. Morrison’s work–more than 30 projects to date–has been presented in museums, theaters, galleries, and concert halls around the world. The exhibition includes two world premieres: Back to the Soil (2014), which revisits footage shot by Morrison’s grandfather, James H. Becker, of Jewish farming colonies in Eastern Europe, and Beyond Zero: 1914-1918 (2014), a composite film. A monthly changing selection of single-channel work spanning Morrison’s career will be on view in the Museum’s Lauder Lobby from mid-September through March 2015. Bill Morrison: Compositions is organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, and Sally Berger, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

Morrison uses the physical decomposition of 35mm nitrate film as the catalyst for his existential narratives, creating work that investigates the tension between archives and memory. His 1996 film The Film of Her, for example, while not his first to use found footage, was the first to concern itself with the direct metaphor of the fragility of motion picture film, using its inherent predisposition towards chemical decomposition to express the ephemeral nature of love. Morrison’s work is concerned with creating original narratives in abstract form as well as retelling “lost” narratives, such as his exploration of Britain’s former colliery culture in The Miner’s Hymns from 2011. 

Prints courtesy of Bill Morrison and Icarus Films. 

The Vanquishing of the Witch Baba Yaga. 2013. USA/Russia/ Ukraine/Poland. Directed by Jessica Oreck. Courtesy Argot Pictures

MoMA Presents: Jessica Oreck’s The Vanquishing of the Witch Baba Yaga

October 15, 2014–October 21, 2014

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Jessica Oreck’s strange and beguiling film, one of the highlights of MoMA’s New Directors/New Films 2014, combines Eastern European storybook animation with documentary and fiction elements to recount the Slavic fable of the Witch Baba Yaga, a frightful character living in a woodland hut perched on chicken legs. In Baba Yaga, as with her previous documentary hybrids, Aatsinki: The Story of Arctic Cowboys and Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo, Oreck is fascinated by the rituals, superstitions, and fables of diverse subcultures. In the case of Baba Yaga, Oreck focuses especially on the contemporary relevance of childhood stories to war and social upheaval; memory and trauma; and our relationship with the natural world, the threat we pose to that world, and the threat that world poses to us.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film.

Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901–1985). Bird Perched on the Corner of the Wall (Angle de mur à l'oiseau perché) from the supplementary suite for the book Walls (Les Murs) by Eugène Guillevic. 1945. Lithograph, composition and sheet: 14 3/8 x 11" (36.5 x 27.9 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph F. Colin, 1965. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground

October 18, 2014–April 05, 2015

The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor

Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901–1985), whose work was marked by a rebellious attitude toward prevailing notions of high culture, beauty, and good taste, is a significant figure in MoMA’s collection, with holdings numbering over 1,200 works. From the time Dubuffet committed himself to art-making in the early 1940s, he was a relentless innovator. Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground illuminates Dubuffet’s radical experimentation with form and material by focusing on the artist’s work at a key span of his career, from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. Dubuffet mixed sand, gravel, and other materials into his pigments, applying them in layers with brushes and palette knives to create a thickened impasto, and then excavated images from them by scratching and scraping away with the pointed handle of his paintbrush. He revolutionized lithography, experimenting with textures by attacking lithographic stones with sandpaper, rags, and chemicals, and creating images with dirt, fruit peels, leaves, and other organic materials. Drawings in ink or gouache mimicked these feats of combination and re-combination, resulting in surfaces of decaying or ever-expanding membranes. Acknowledging the importance of materiality to his process, Dubuffet wrote, “Art must be born from the material and from the tool, and must preserve the trace of the tool or the tool’s battle with the material.”

This exhibition draws on MoMA’s unparalleled collection of Dubuffet’s paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, and illustrated books, charting his move toward near-total abstraction with pictures comprised of allover compositions unanchored by horizons, topographies of layered sand and dirt, or patterned lithographs of droplets and granules. Central to this presentation is the monumental lithographic project the Phenomenaseries (1958–62), which manifests the artist’s fascination with surfaces of the earth and natural forces, and which became fodder for future works across mediums, as he cut up prints, collaged them, and reconstituted them. Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground is the first monographic presentation on the artist at MoMA in over 25 years.  

Organized by Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator, and Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Production still from Bert Williams Lime Kiln Field Day Project. Odessa Warren Grey and Bert Williams

Previously Unidentified, 101-Year-Old Film Footage Discovered in MoMA’s Collection Is The Earliest Known Feature Film Made with Black Actors

October 24, 2014–March 01, 2015

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries

Press Preview for "100 Years in Post-Production":
Friday, October 24, 2014, 10:00 a.m.

The Museum of Modern Art announces the discovery of previously unidentified, 101-year-old film footage, the earliest known surviving feature film with a cast of black actors. The unedited daily rushes—multiple “takes” shot each day during production—were found among a trove of 900 negatives from the pioneering Biograph Studio that were acquired by MoMA’s founding Film curator, Iris Barry, in 1939, just prior to their scheduled destruction following the closure of Biograph’s Bronx facilities. Though a few other movies from that period featuring black casts, such as William Foster’s The Pullman Porter (1913) and Hunter C. Haynes’s Uncle Remus’ First Visit to New York (1914) are known to have been filmed, all are considered lost. The discovery of the 1913 rushes launched a multiyear research project to identify the production, its actors, and its crew, led by Ron Magliozzi, Associate Curator, and Peter Williamson, Preservation Officer, Department of Film, MoMA. Selections from the film, along with research findings, archival materials, and film stills will go on view October 24, 2014, in the Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Lobby Galleries in the exhibition 100 Years in Post-Production: Resurrecting a Lost Landmark of Black Film History (through March 2015). The world premiere presentation of the assembled rushes will be on November 8, 2014, in MoMA’s annual film preservation festival To Save and Project (October 24–November 22, 2014), organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, and Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, with Sophie Cavoulacos, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, MoMA.

Starring the legendary Caribbean American musical theater performer and recording artist Bert Williams (1874–1922), the seven reels of untitled and unassembled rushes were filmed at virtually the same time that D. W. Griffith began The Birth of a Nation.

In addition to narrative scenes, the reels reveal candid footage of the black cast and white crew interacting on set, and several frames of Williams mingling with white extras on a suburban street location during a break in filming. The rushes also provide nearly eight minutes of documentary footage of the interracial cast and crew on the New York studio sets and suburban New Jersey locations (in what is believed to be Englewood).

The Iron Mask. 1929. USA. Directed by Allan Dwan

To Save and Project: The 12th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation

October 24, 2014–November 22, 2014

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Each fall, MoMA’s annual festival of newly preserved films, To Save and Project, brings together masterworks and rediscoveries from film archives, studios, and foundations from around the world. Many of the films in the festival will be receiving their first American screening since their original release; others will be shown in meticulously restored editions that more closely approximate the original experience of the film; a few will even be publicly screened for the first time ever in New York. Included among this year’s highlights is a sensational restoration by the George Eastman House of sequences that Orson Welles filmed, but never used, for the 1938 Mercury Theatre production Too Much Johnson, and the pioneering black comedian Bert Williams who stars in an uncompleted 1913 feature recently discovered in MoMA’s collection of original Biograph negatives. Also presented are films by Charles Chaplin, Maya Deren, Derek Jarman, Sergio Leone, Kenji Mizoguchi, Raul Ruiz, and Edgar G. Ulmer. Guest presenters include Kathryn Bigelow, John Boorman, George Chakiris, and Ken Jacobs.

The opening-night film is the North American premiere of a new MoMA restoration: Allan Dwan’s 1929 masterpiece The Iron Mask, a rousingly entertaining swashbuckler starring Douglas Fairbanks that is often considered, as Dwan himself called it, “the last of the big silents.” MoMA’s version, however, contains the entire original Vitaphone soundtrack—with music, sound effects, and three spoken sequences—which will be heard here for the first time since the film’s original roadshow presentation.

These titles will join dozens of others from archives both public and private to create a four-week overview of the tremendously exciting work that is being done around the world to reclaim endangered films and rediscover forgotten treasures. For more information and a complete screening schedule, please visit MoMA.org/film.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, and Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, with Sophie Cavoulacos, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film.

Bob and Roberta Smith. Artists Ruin it For Everyone. 2002. Acrylic on fabric, 74 x 67.5 inches. Image courtesy the artist and Pierogi

MoMA PS1 and Bob & Roberta Smith Invite You to Throw Your Art Away

October 26, 2014–March 08, 2015

Courtyard and 2nd Floor Main Galleries

Bob and Roberta Smith are offering an opportunity for artists to dispose of their artwork at MoMA PS1, and to retire from making art. Beginning October 2, artists are invited to deposit their art in dumpsters located in the museum’s courtyard, which will be emptied as needed throughout the period of the Art Amnesty. Those who wish to exhibit their work one final time before it is destroyed may bring their art to the 2nd Floor Main Galleries, where museum staff will install it for public view. The museum will accept work under the Art Amnesty during regular hours, subject to certain restrictions that will be published at momaps1.org. The exhibition reprises and expands upon their Art Amnesty originally presented at Pierogi Gallery in 2002.

As part of the Art Amnesty, the Smiths will also make available a pledge form at the museum that can be signed by any artist or member of the public: I PROMISE NEVER TO MAKE ART AGAIN. Those who commit themselves will receive an official I AM NO LONGER AN ARTIST badge designed by Bob and Roberta Smith, and shall be invited to create one final drawing for inclusion in the Art Amnesty gallery exhibition, using materials provided onsite. Those wishing simply to discard a work will be asked to sign a pledge that reads I NEVER WANT TO SEE THIS WORK OF ART AGAIN.

 While the Art Amnesty provides an occasion for artists to clear out their studios, it also serves other needs. Those who have been the victims of gifts of art, for example, are invited to dispose of these unwanted aesthetic presents at the museum. And as the Smiths note, “Many successful artists have recently voiced embarrassment that their work commands high prices. Artists may also use the opportunity of the Art Amnesty to expel certain works of art from the art market and demote them to objects unburdened by grand expectations and dashed dreams.” The Smiths will be the first to contribute to the Art Amnesty, discarding a batch of work previously exhibited in New York.

 Art Amnesty is organized by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1, with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Assistant.

The exhibition is made possible by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

Winter Sleep.  2014. Turkey. Directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

Filmmaker in Focus: Nuri Bilge Ceylan

October 29, 2014–November 05, 2014

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

With only seven features and one short film to his credit, the Turkish filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan has become one of the most respected names in world cinema, a contemporary master with an attentive, concentrated, slow-burn style all his own. Using a mix of professional and amateur performers (sometimes including his wife and writing partner, Ebru Ceylan), the filmmaker constructs a world of both breathtaking physical immediacy and philosophical distance. An accomplished photographer, Ceylan seems to coax his films organically from their settings, using mood, widescreen framing, and a contemplative pace to draw the viewer into his world—which can be as lonely as it is beautiful. All films are directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan and in Turkish with English subtitles.

Organized by Jytte Jensen, Curator, and Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, Department of Film.

Prints courtesy of Adopt Films, Cinema Guild, and Zeitgeist Films. 

Sturtevant. Haring Tag July 15 1981. 1985. Sumi ink and acrylic on cloth. 9 13/16 × 12 13/16″ (25 × 32.5 cm). Estate Sturtevant, Paris. Courtesy Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris–Salzburg. Photo: Prallen Allsten. © Estate Sturtevant, Paris

Sturtevant: Double Trouble

November 09, 2014–February 22, 2015

Special Exhibitions Gallery, third floor

Press Preview: Tuesday, November 4, 2014, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

MoMA presents the first comprehensive survey in the U.S. of the 50-year career of Sturtevant (American, 1924–2014), and the only institutional presentation of her work organized in the U.S. since a solo exhibition at the Everson Museum of Art in 1973. Sturtevant: Double Trouble brings together over 50 key artworks from all periods of Sturtevant’s career in almost every medium in which she worked—including painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, film, and video—identifying her as a pioneering and pivotal figure in the history of modern and postmodern art. The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1, with Ingrid Langston, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, MoMA. The exhibition will travel to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles from March 21, to July 27, 2015.

The artist began showing under the name “Sturtevant” in a group exhibition at the Betty Parsons Gallery in New York in 1960. She started making her own versions of the works of her contemporaries in 1964, using some of the most iconic artworks of her generation as a source and catalyst for the exploration of originality, authorship, and the interior structures of art. Beginning with her versions of works by Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol, Sturtevant initially turned the visual logic of Pop art back on itself, probing uncomfortably at the workings of art history in real time. Yet her chameleonlike embrace of other artists’ art has also led Sturtevant to be largely overlooked in the history of postwar American art. As a woman making versions of the work of mostly better-known male artists, she has passed almost unnoticed through the hierarchies of mid-century modernism and postmodernism, at once absent from these histories while nevertheless articulating their structures.

Though her “repetitions” may appear to be simply mimetic exercises in proto-appropriation, Sturtevant is better understood as an artist who adopted style as her medium and took the art of her time as a loose score to be enacted and reinterpreted. Far more than mere copies, her versions of Johns’s flags, Warhol’s flowers, and Joseph Beuys’s fat chair are studies in the action of art that expose aspects of its making, reception, circulation, and canonization. Working primarily in video during her last decade, Sturtevant extended her interest in simulation to the media environment, incorporating footage from Hollywood films, television, and advertising to make literal reference to larger considerations of politics, truth, and violence—concerns that animated her work from its inception.

The exhibition is made possible by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund, Lonti Ebers, Dorothy Lichtenstein and Virginia Dwan.

Additional funding is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, and the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

 

Snowpiercer. 2014. South Korea/Czech Republic/USA/France. Directed by Bong Joon-ho. Courtesy of TWC Radius

The Contenders 2014

November 13, 2014–January 15, 2015

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Every year there are films that resonate far beyond a theatrical release—if they manage to find their way to a commercial screen at all—or film festival appearance. Their significance can be attributed to a variety of factors, from structure to subject matter to language, but these films are united in their lasting impact on the cinematic art form. For this recurring series, the Department of Film combs through major studio releases and the top film festivals in the world, selecting influential, innovative films made in the past 12 months that we believe will stand the test of time. Whether bound for awards glory or destined to become a cult classic, each of these films is a contender for lasting historical significance, and any true cinephile will want to catch them on the big screen.

Organized by the Department of Film.