Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

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Jonathas de Andrade (Brazilian, born 1982). The Uprising (O Levante). 2013. Video (color, sound), 8 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Pedro Barbosa and Patricia Moraes, Luis Augusto Teixeira de Freitas, Mr. and Mrs. John Austin, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Klimt, and Roberto Lima, 2016. © 2017 Jonathas de Andrade

Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection

March 19, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery

This exhibition brings together work made in the past decade by more than a dozen artists. These recent additions to the Museum’s collection explore the unrest, anxiety, and critical reflection that characterizes our world. Responding to today’s fierce identity politics and crises of truth, the exhibition includes artworks that construct imagined scenarios or use observation of real events in subjective depictions. In particular, the works consider the vagaries of state violence, the implications of global capitalism, and the contemporary reverberations of transatlantic slavery. These artists look back to traditions both within and beyond the visual arts, such as readymade sculpture, film montage, and folk storytelling, to imagine possibilities for an uncertain future. The exhibition includes works by John Akomfrah, Jonathas de Andrade, Anna Boghiguian, Samuel Fosso, Iman Issa, Cameron Rowland, Wolfgang Tillmans, Kara Walker, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, among others.

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art and Director MoMA PS1; Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art; Christian Rattemeyer, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture. 

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Additional support for Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid March 25, 2017–April 02, 2017

Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid

March 29, 2017–April 02, 2017

Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

The starting point for Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid is a simple question: Can choreography be performed in the form of an exhibition? To answer that question, one of today’s most important dancer/choreographers reimagined her stage performance Vortex Temporum (2013)—choreographed to the eponymous work by the late French composer Gérard Grisey—for a museum space, away from a conventional theater setting.

Work/Travail/Arbeid is not De Keersmaeker’s first project to be performed in the museum space; in 2011 she performed the solo Violin Phase, part of her very first piece Fase: Four Movements to the Music of Steve Reich (1982), in MoMA’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium. But with Work/Travail/Arbeid the artist imagines the choreography in relation to the practices and protocols of an exhibition. The dancers from De Keersmaeker’s company, Rosas, and the musicians, from the Ictus ensemble, are not simply bringing dance into a museum; they are reinterpreting dance in the space of MoMA’s Marron Atrium in the form of a five-day exhibition, accessible continuously to the audience during public hours. The original hour-long piece has been expanded to a nine-hour cycle, with each hour offering different choreography and combinations of seven dancers and seven musicians. (Vortex Temporum is originally a sextet for piano, flute, clarinet, violin, viola, and cello.) Throughout her career De Keersmaeker has focused on the relationship between music and dance: rather than allow the dance to simply illustrate the music, De Keersmaeker uses music as a defining structure. The relation to music in Vortex Temporum, for example, influenced how she reconceived it for the exhibition. Time and harmonic space are expanded and condensed, creating the vortexes of time suggested by the work’s title.

Work/Travail/Arbeid is an itinerant exhibition, first staged at WIELS in Brussels over nine weeks in 2015; then at Centre Pompidou over nine days in a large square space with glass walls, which invited the city itself into the work; and then moving to Tate Modern in London, in the long rectangular space of the Turbine Hall. Each space presented different challenges of adaptation and reconceptualization, a dynamic that continues with the version being re-choreographed and re-created for the unique dimensions of MoMA’s Marron Atrium.

In each of those cases the result is a project that transforms the very material conditions that have long been essential to dance—and in particular the rigorous structure and choreographic language for which De Keersmaeker is known—into an entirely new form of exhibition. The expanded duration of Work/Travail/Arbeid reveals new insights into the complex conceptual, technical, and physical labor that is essential to the practice of dance.

Organized by Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art; produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Piano provided by Steinway & Sons.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with Rosas, Ictus, and WIELS Contemporary Art Centre.

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Ian Cheng

Ian Cheng

April 09, 2017–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present Ian Cheng’s (b. 1984) first U.S. museum solo presentation, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015-2017), a series of three live simulation video works dedicated to the history of cognitive evolution. These works ask us to imagine technology not as a subordinate reflection of our own minds, but as a tool to model a non-anthropomorphic vision of history and consciousness. Using an engine for developing video games, Emissary is made up of open-ended animations with no fixed outcome or narrative—a format Cheng calls live simulation. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Joan Mitchell (American, 1925–1992). Ladybug. 1957. Oil on canvas, 6' 5 7/8" x 9' (197.9 x 274 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1961. © Estate of Joan Mitchell

Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15, 2017–August 13, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning but still relatively under-recognized achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by some 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse. The exhibition will also feature many little-known treasures such as collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and prints made at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, founded by June Wayne.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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MoMA_Lawler_Why Pictures Now

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW

April 30, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, and The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW is the first major survey in New York of the artist Louise Lawler (American, b. 1947), spanning the 40-year creative output of one of the most influential artists working in the fields of image production and institutional critique. The exhibition takes its title from one of Lawler’s most iconic works, Why Pictures Now (1982), a black-and-white photograph showing a matchbook propped up in an ashtray. Reminiscent of an advertising photograph or a film noir still, it asks the viewer to consider why the work takes the form of a picture, and why the artist is making pictures now. Lawler came of age as part of the Pictures Generation, a loosely knit, highly independent group of artists named for an influential exhibition, Pictures, organized in 1977 by art historian Douglas Crimp at Artists Space in New York. These artists used photography and appropriation-driven strategies to examine the functions and codes of representation. Lawler’s signature style was established in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when she began taking pictures of other artists’ works displayed in collectors’ homes, museums, storage spaces, and auction houses to question the value, meaning, and use of art. WHY PICTURES NOW is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, with Kelly Sidley, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Generous funding is provided by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Peter Moore. Photograph of Robert Rauschenberg’s Pelican (1963) as performed in a former CBS television studio, New York, during the First New York Theater Rally, May 1965. Photo © Barbara Moore/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. © 2016 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends

May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017

Floor Four, Collection Galleries

In 1959, Robert Rauschenberg wrote, “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. (I try to act in that gap between the two.)” His work in this gap shaped artistic practice for decades to come.

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

Robert Rauschenberg, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Acclaimed artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas is collaborating on the exhibition’s design to foreground Rauschenberg’s work with dance and performance. MoMA’s presentation is structured as an “open monograph”—as other artists came into Rauschenberg’s creative life, they come into the exhibition, mapping the exchange of ideas. These figures include John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Sari Dienes, Jasper Johns, Billy Klüver, Yvonne Rainer, Paul Taylor, David Tudor, Cy Twombly, Susan Weil, and many others.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Robert Rauschenberg.

The exhibition is supported at Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by Glenn and Eva Dubin, Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, Mrs. Ronnie F. Heyman, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, and by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III in honor of Jerry I. Speyer.

Select programs in conjunction with Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends at The Museum of Modern Art are made possible through a grant from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Incense, Sweaters, and Ice (film still) 2017. Courtesy the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York.

Projects 106: Martine Syms

May 27, 2017–July 16, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

Projects 106: Martine Syms, the first US solo museum exhibition by Martine Syms (b. 1988, Los Angeles), is an immersive installation including photographs and staged objects, and centering around a new feature-length film, Incense, Sweaters, and Ice.

Shot on location in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, Incense, Sweaters, and Ice follows three protagonists—Mrs. Queen Esther Bernetta White, Girl, and WB (“whiteboy”)—as they navigate dramas of surveillance, moving between watching, being watched, and remaining unseen. Accompanying the film is a suite of photographs sized to standard American movie posters and a metal mesh structure inspired by the geographies of the Great Migration.

Using video and performance, Syms examines representations of blackness and its relationship to narrative, vernacular, feminist thought, and radical traditions. Her artwork has been exhibited and screened extensively, including presentations at the Berlin Biennale, Manifesta 11, ICA London, The Hammer Museum, the New Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Initiated by MoMA in 1971 as a platform for new and experimental art, the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series, now presented at both The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1, provides a forum for the most urgent international voices in contemporary art. Projects 106: Martine Syms will be accompanied by an illustrated brochure. On the occasion of her exhibition, Syms will premiere a new lecture-performance as part of MoMA’s educational programming.

Projects 106: Martine Syms is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Plan for Greater Baghdad, Baghdad. Project, 1957. Aerial perspective of the cultural center and University from the north. Ink, pencil, and colored pencil on tracing paper, 34 7/8 x 52" (88.6 x 132.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise approximately 450 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archive, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archive, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Performance still from Facets: A Recital Compilation by Terry Adkins, November 8, 2012 at the Arthur Zankel Music Center, Skidmore College. Photo: Patrick O'Rourke

Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), has an accumulative, rotating membership of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these “installation based experiences [issued] from an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” The Lone Wolf Recital Corps’ performances, which Adkins orchestrated with the collaborative improvisation of the Corps, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as John Brown, John Coltrane, Matthew Henson, Bessie Smith, and others.

Projects 107 will be the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. Conceived as a series of live performances by the reconstituted Corps, a changing group of artists will reprise selections from the group’s repertoire in an installation of Adkins’ sculptures. The exhibition will be supplemented by documentary video of earlier recitals, as well as performance props, costumes, and ephemera that trace the history of the Corps.

Projects 107 will bring together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians, including Sanford Biggers, Don Byron, Jean-Paul Bourelly, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Demetrius Oliver, Cavassa Nickens, Clifford Owens, Kamau Patton, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Robert Wisdom, Tukufu Zuberi, and others.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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White T-shirt. Image courtesy Shutterstock/SFIO CRACHO

Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Six, Exhibition Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the wide range of relationships between clothing and functionality, culture, aesthetics, politics, labor, economy, and technology in the exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern? In examining the ways in which wearable items are designed, manufactured, distributed, and used, the exhibition will present a selection of 111 examples of garments, footwear, and accessories that have had a strong impact on history and society in the 20th and 21st centuries, and continue to hold currency today. Comprised of examples as well-known, universal, and transformative as Levi’s 501 jeans and the bikini; as coveted as the Prada nylon backpack and the Hermès Birkin bag; and as culturally charged and historically rich as the Pashmina shawl, the dashiki, the kippah, and the keffiyeh, the exhibition will allow viewers to explore the influence of these items and their designers on Western culture over many decades.

Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition will present items along three tiers: archetype, stereotype, and prototype. In the installation, each item will be presented in the incarnation that made it significant in the last 100 (or so) years—the stereotype—accompanied by contextual material tracing back to its historical archetypes. In some cases, when innovation, opportunity, or necessity call for it, the item will be complemented by a new commission, or prototype. Thus, within the exhibition, designers, artists, scientists, engineers, and manufacturers will be invited to respond to some of these “indispensable items” with pioneering materials, approaches, and design revisions—extending this conversation into the near and distant future, and connecting the history of these garments with their present recombination and use.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at medium.com/items. The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at mo.ma/items. It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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