Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Willi Ruge (German, 1882-1961). Seconds before Landing from the series I Photograph Myself during a Parachute Jump. 1931. Gelatin silver print. 8 1/16 × 5 9/16" (20.4 × 14.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Thomas Walther Collection. Gift of Thomas Walther.

Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909-1949

December 13, 2014–April 26, 2015

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor

The creative possibilities explored through photography were never richer or more varied than in the years between the First and Second World Wars, when photographers approached figuration, abstraction, and architecture with unmatched imaginative fervor. This vital moment is dramatically captured in the more than 300 photographs that constitute the Thomas Walther Collection at The Museum of Modern Art. This remarkable group of objects is presented together for the first time to coincide with the culmination of the Thomas Walther Collection Project—a four-year collaboration between the Museum’s curatorial and conservation staff, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which has transformed our understanding of the medium’s material history from this era. Made on the street and in the studio, intended for avant-garde exhibitions or the printed page, these objects provide unique insight into the radical intentions of their creators.

The Museum acquired more than 300 photographs from Thomas Walther’s private collection in 2001.  Featuring iconic works by such towering figures as Berenice Abbott, Karl Blossfeldt, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Claude Cahun, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Florence Henri, André Kertész, Germaine Krull, El Lissitzky, Lucia Moholy, László Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Maurice Tabard Umbo, and Edward Weston, along with lesser-known treasures by more than 100 other practitioners, this exhibition presents the exhilarating story of this key moment in photography’s history, allowing both experts and those less familiar with the medium to understand these photographs in new ways.

The website OBJECT: PHOTO The Thomas Walther Collection presents the culmination of the ambitious and ground-breaking, four-year research collaboration between MoMA’s Departments of Photography and Conservation focused on the development of photographic modernism in Europe and the United States. The MoMA team is also working with the participation of over 30 leading, international photography scholars and conservators for an eponymous publication that will be the most extensive effort to integrate conservation and curatorial research efforts on photography to date and the forerunner of photography research currently underway at other museums. This collaborative project is led by Maria Morris Hambourg, Founding Curator, Department of Photographs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Jim Coddington, Chief Conservator, MoMA. In their respective departments, the project is overseen by Mitra Abbaspour, Associate Curator, and Lee Ann Daffner, Andrew W. Mellon Conservator of Photographs. Additionally, a symposium is being planned, with details and the date forthcoming.

The exhibition is organized by Quentin Bajac, the Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, with Angeliki Kounava, 12-Month Intern, Department of Photography, MoMA.

The Thomas Walther Collection Project is made possible by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Kerstin Brätsch Blocked Radiant D (for Ioana) 2011 Oil on paper 110 × 72” (279.4 × 182.9 cm) Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise Copyright the artist Photo: Filippo Armellin

The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World

December 14, 2014–April 05, 2015

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery, sixth floor

Press Preview: Monday, December 8, 2014, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

The Forever Now presents the work of 17 artists whose paintings reflect a singular approach that characterizes our cultural moment at the beginning of this new millennium: they refuse to allow us to define, or even meter our time by them. This phenomenon in culture was first identified by the science fiction writer William Gibson, who used the term “a-temporality” to describe a cultural product of our moment that paradoxically doesn’t represent, through style, through content, or through medium, the time from which it comes. A-temporality, or timelessness, manifests itself in painting as an ahistorical free-for-all, where contemporaneity as an indicator of new form is nowhere to be found, and all eras co-exist. This profligate mixing of past styles and genres can be identified as a kind of hallmark for our moment in painting, with artists achieving it by reanimating historical styles or recreating a contemporary version of them, sampling motifs from across the timeline of 20th-century art in a single painting or across an oeuvre, or radically paring their language down to the most archetypal forms.

The artists in this exhibition represent a wide variety of styles and impulses, but all use the painted surface as a platform, map, or metaphoric screen on which genres intermingle, morph, and collide. Their work represents traditional painting, in the sense that each artist engages with painting’s traditions, testing and ultimately reshaping historical strategies like appropriation and bricolage and reframing more metaphysical, high-stakes questions surrounding notions of originality, subjectivity, and spiritual transcendence.

The exhibition includes works by Richard Aldrich, Joe Bradley, Kerstin Brätsch, Matt Connors, Michaela Eichwald, Nicole Eisenman, Mark Grotjahn, Charline von Heyl, Rashid Johnson, Julie Mehretu, Dianna Molzan, Oscar Murillo, Laura Owens, Amy Sillman, Josh Smith, Mary Weatherford, and Michael Williams.

The exhibition is organized by Laura Hoptman, Curator, with Margaret Ewing, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.
 
Additional funding is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, and the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
Special thanks to the Aishti Foundation, Beirut.

 

Still from the "All Is Full of Love" music video. 1999. Directed by Chris Cunningham. Music by Björk. Image courtesy of One Little Indian

Björk

March 07, 2015–June 07, 2015

 

The Museum of Modern Art announces that it will present a full-scale retrospective dedicated to the multifaceted work of the composer, musician, and artist Björk in 2015. Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large at MoMA and Director of MoMA PS1, the exhibition Björk draws from more than 20 years of the artist’s daring and adventurous projects and her seven full-length albums—from Debut (1993) to Biophilia (2011)—to chronicle her career through sound, film, visuals, instruments, objects, costumes, and performance. The installation will present a narrative, both biographical and imaginatively fictitious, cowritten by Björk and the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón Sigurdsson. Björk’s collaborations with video directors, photographers, fashion designers, and artists will be featured, and the exhibition culminates with a newly commissioned, immersive music and film experience conceived and realized with director Andrew Thomas Huang and 3-D design leader Autodesk. Björk will be on view from March 7 through June 7, 2015; MoMA is the sole venue.

The exhibition is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America.

Major support is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Brasilia under construction, 1957. Geofoto. Arquivo Publico do Distrito Federal

Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980

March 29, 2015–July 12, 2015

The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor

In 1955 The Museum of Modern Art staged Latin American Architecture since 1945, a landmark survey of modern architecture in Latin America. On the 60th anniversary of that important show, the Museum returns to the region to offer a complex overview of the positions, debates, and architectural creativity from Mexico and Cuba to the Southern Cone between 1955 and the early 1980s.

This period of self-questioning, exploration, and complex political shifts also saw the emergence of the notion of Latin America as a landscape of development, one in which all aspects of cultural life were colored in one way or another by this new attitude to what emerged as the “Third World.” The 1955 exhibition featured the result of a single photographic campaign, but Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980 brings together a wealth of original materials that have never before been brought together and, for the most part, are rarely exhibited even in their home countries.

The exhibition features architectural drawings, architectural models, vintage photographs, and film clips alongside newly commissioned models and photographs by Brazilian photographer Leonardo Finotti. While the exhibition focuses on the period of 1955 to 1980 in most of the countries of Latin America, it is introduced by an ample prelude on the preceding three decades of architectural developments in the region, presentations of the development of several key university campuses in cities like Mexico City and Caracas, and a look at the development of the new Brazilian capital at Brasilia. Architects met these challenges with formal, urbanistic, and programmatic innovation, much of it relevant still to the challenges of our own period, in which Latin America is again providing exciting and challenging architecture and urban responses to the ongoing issues of modernization and development, though in vastly different economic and political contexts than those considered in this major historical reevaluation.

The exhibition is accompanied by two major publications: a catalogue and an anthology of primary texts translated from Spanish and Portuguese.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, and Patricio del Real, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA; Jorge Francisco Liernur, Universidad Torcuato di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Carlos Eduardo Comas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; with the assistance of an advisory committee from across Latin America.

The exhibition is supported in part by The Reed Foundation, Inc.

 Research and travel support was provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Grete Stern. Dreams No. 1. 1949. Gelatin silver print. 10 1/2 x 9" (26.6 x 22.9 cm). Latin American and Caribbean Fund through gift of Marie Josée and Henry R. Kravis in honor of Adriana Cisneros de Griffin. © 2014 Galería Jorge Mara-La Ruche

From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola

May 23, 2015–September 13, 2015

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor

From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola is the first major exhibition of the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic. In Berlin in 1927, Stern began taking private classes with Walter Peterhans, who was soon to become head of photography at the Bauhaus. A year later, in Peterhans’s studio, she met Ellen (Rosenberg) Auerbach, with whom she opened a pioneering studio specializing in portraiture and advertising. Named after their childhood nicknames, the studio ringl + pit embraced both commercial and avant-garde loyalties, creating proto-feminist works. In Buenos Aires during the same period, Coppola initiated his photographic experimentations, exploring his surroundings and contributing to the discourse on modernist practices across media in local cultural magazines. In 1929 he founded the Buenos Aires Film Club to introduce the most advanced foreign films to Argentine audiences. His early works show a burgeoning interest in new modes of photographic expression that led him to the Bauhaus in 1932, where he met Stern and they began their joint history.

Following the close of the Bauhaus and the rising threat of the Nazi powers in 1933, Stern and Coppola fled Germany. Stern arrived first in London, where her friends included activists affiliated with leftist circles and where she made her now iconic portraits of German exiles. After traveling through Europe, camera in hand, Coppola joined Stern in London, where he pursued a modernist idiom in his photographs of the fabric of the city, tinged alternately with social concern and surrealist strangeness.

In the summer of 1935, Stern and Coppola embarked for Buenos Aires where they mounted an exhibition in the offices of the avant-garde magazine Sur, announcing the arrival of modern photography in Argentina. The unique character of Buenos Aires was captured in Coppola’s photographic encounters from the city’s center to its outskirts and in Stern’s numerous portraits of the city’s intelligentsia. The exhibition ends in the early 1950s, with Stern’s forward-thinking Sueños (Dreams), a series of photomontages she contributed to the popular women’s magazine Idilio, portraying women’s dreams with urgency and surreal wit.

The exhibition is accompanied by a major publication edited by Roxana Marcoci and Sarah Meister with a selection of original texts by Stern and Coppola translated into English by Rachel Kaplan. The catalogue will consist of three essays on the artists written by the exhibition curators and scholar Jodi Roberts.

Organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, and Sarah Meister, Curator, with Drew Sawyer, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and by The David Berg Foundation.
 
Additional funding is provided by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
Research and travel support was provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.
Zoe Leonard (American, b. 1961). Chapter 17 from Analogue. 1998–2007. Twelve chromogenic color prints from 412 prints, each 11 x 11" (27.9 x 27.9 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, the Fund for the Twenty-First Century, The Modern Women's Fund, and Carol Appel

Zoe Leonard: Analogue

June 27, 2015–September 07, 2015

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor

This exhibition presents Zoe Leonard’s Analogue—a landmark photographic project conceived over the course of a decade—which documents, in 412 color and black-and-white photographs, the eclipsed texture of 20th-century urban life as seen in little bodegas, mom-and-pop stores with decaying facades and quirky handwritten signs, and shop windows displaying a mixed assortment of products.

Shooting with a vintage 1940s Rolleiflex camera, a tool “left over from the mechanical age,” as Leonard puts it, the artist took her own neighborhood of New York’s Lower East Side as a point of departure. She then followed the global trade of recycled merchandise—used T-shirts, old-fashioned shoes, discarded Coke advertisements, the old technology of Kodak camera shops—to far-flung places in Eastern Europe, Africa, Cuba, and Mexico. Tapping the traditions of documentary and conceptual photography, Leonard’s project is positioned within the genealogy of the grand visual archives that extend from Eugène Atget’s Paris “then and now,” to August Sander’s Face of Our Time, to Bernd and Hilla Becher’s typologies of vernacular architecture.

The exhibition is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, Department of Photography.

The exhibition is made possible by The Modern Women’s Fund.