Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
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The Value of Good Design

February 10, 2019–May 27, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Featuring objects from domestic furnishings and appliances to ceramics, glass, electronics, transport design, sporting goods, toys, and graphics, The Value of Good Design explores the democratizing potential of design, beginning with MoMA’s Good Design initiatives from the late 1930s through the 1950s, which championed well-designed, affordable contemporary products. The concept of Good Design also took hold well beyond the Museum, with governments on both sides of the Cold War divide embracing it as a vital tool of social and economic reconstruction and technological advancement in the years following World War II. This global scope is reflected in many of the items on view, from a mass-market Italian Fiat Cinquecento automobile and a Soviet-era East German Werra camera to a Japanese Sony television and a Brazilian bowl chair. These works join both iconic and unexpected items made in the US, such as the Eames La Chaise, a Chemex Coffee Maker, and Irwin Gershen’s Shrimp Cleaner.

The exhibition also raises questions about what Good Design might mean today, and whether values from mid-century can be translated and redefined for a 21st-century audience. Visitors are invited to judge for themselves by trying out a few “good design” classics still in production, and exploring how, through its design stores, MoMA continues to incubate new products and ideas in an international marketplace.

Organized by Juliet Kinchin, Curator, and Andrew Gardner, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

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Joan Miró: Birth of the World

February 24, 2019–July 06, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Joan Miró: Birth of the World, an exhibition that explores the development of Miró’s pictorial universe, with particular emphasis on his intense engagement with poetry, the creative process, material experimentation, and the seen and unseen world. This focused exhibition, drawn from MoMA’s unrivalled Miró collection and augmented by several key loans, situates his monumental painting, The Birth of the World (1925), in relation to other key works by the artist, which are rarely shown together. On view from February 24 through July 6, 2019, the exhibition includes approximately 60 paintings, works on paper, prints, illustrated books, collages, and objects primarily made between 1920, the year of Miró’s first catalytic trip to Paris, and the early 1950s, when his unique visual language gained international acclaim.

The Museum of Modern Art’s collection of Miró’s works constitutes one of the finest and most comprehensive in the world. In 1941, MoMA organized the first major museum retrospective of Miró’s work, followed by others in 1959 and 1993, the centennial of the artist’s birth. The Museum has also presented focused exhibitions, most recently Joan Miró: Painting and Anti-Painting 1927–1937 (2008), which explored a single, transformative decade in Miró’s long career. The present exhibition extends the Museum’s commitment to Miró by offering for examination and reassessment an in-depth presentation of his works from the collection.

The exhibition is organized by Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Senior Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century

March 17, 2019–June 23, 2019

Floor Two, Contemporary Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art announces New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century, on view from March 17 through June 23, 2019. Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition includes works made since the turn of the millennium that push the boundaries of technology: upending systems, twisting materials, and inventing novel techniques and forms. The exhibition explores the ways in which technological processes are still stubbornly tied to the physical world—mired in matter, friction, and breakdown. 

With a number of recent acquisitions and large-scale installations never before shown at the Museum, the exhibition showcases a diverse range of techniques and media, from live digital simulation to 3-D printing, magnetic resonance imaging, industrial vacuum-formed plastic, and ultrasound gel. Among the featured artists in the exhibition are Josephine Pryde (born 1967, United Kingdom), Anicka Yi (born 1971, South Korea), Seth Price (born 1973, East Jerusalem), and Basim Magdy (born 1977, Egypt). Their art revels in the weird and unexpected, giving rise to hybrid constellations of things, bodies, and data.

New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century is organized by Michelle Kuo, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern

March 17, 2019–June 30, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art announces Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern, an exhibition exploring Lincoln Kirstein’s sweeping contributions to American cultural life in the 1930s and ’40s, on view from March 17 through June 30, 2019. Best known for co-founding the New York City Ballet, Kirstein (1907–1996), a polymathic writer, curator, editor, impresario, tastemaker, and patron, was also a key figure in MoMA’s early history. With his prescient belief in the role of dance within the museum, his championing of figuration in the face of prevailing abstraction, and his position at the center of a New York network of queer artists, intimates, and collaborators, the impact of this extraordinary individual remains profoundly resonant today. Seen through the lens of Kirstein, the works in the exhibition reveal an alternative and expansive view of modern art.

Kirstein proclaimed, “I have a live eye,” and the exhibition illuminates the influence of his vision, tastes, and efforts on the Museum’s collecting, exhibition, and publication history. Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern features more than 200 works from the Museum’s collection—set and costume designs for the ballet by Paul Cadmus and Jared French, photographs by Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, realist and magic realist paintings by Honoré Sharrer and Pavel Tchelitchew, sculpture by Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, and the Latin American art that Kirstein acquired for the Museum by artists such as Antonio Berni and Raquel Forner—alongside material drawn from the Museum Archives.

Organized by Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator, and Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

 

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Simone Fattal

March 31, 2019–September 02, 2019

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition in the United States of the work of Simone Fattal (Lebanese and American, b.1942). The retrospective will bring together a selection of over 100 works created over the last 40 years, featuring abstract and figurative ceramic sculptures, paintings, and collages that draw from a range of sources including war narratives, landscape painting, ancient history, mythology, and Sufi poetry. The exhibition will explore the impact of displacement, as well as the politics of archeology and excavation, as these themes resonate across Fattal’s multifaceted artistic practice.

Simone Fattal is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Gina Beavers

March 31, 2019–September 02, 2019

 

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Gina Beavers (American, b. 1974). In her visceral, vexing, often grotesque paintings, Beavers transforms images sourced from the internet into painted reliefs composed from thick layers of acrylic medium. Born from the online world yet stubbornly physical, Beavers’s paintings condense the ether of digital images into bodily objects that convey both sensuality and abjection. Confronting questions of consumption, desire, and self-fashioning, she gravitates toward a repertoire of recurring subjects that reflect everyday life in the age of social media, such as “food porn,” bodybuilder selfies, and makeup tutorials. Rendered with an unsettling degree of realism, Beavers’s work is always more than merely representational. Whether depicting a painter’s palette or the fluorescent green of a bulbous tennis ball, her high-relief paintings protrude obscenely into the space of the viewer, insisting on their status as tactile things. In her more recent work, the artist both parodies and venerates iconic figures from the history of art, from Van Gogh to Mondrian, pointing to a deep engagement both with painting’s legacies and its continued relevance as a critical lens on contemporary culture.

Gina Beavers is organized by Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

Major support is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Tom Slaughter Exhibition Fund. Additional funding is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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