Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

A New Golden Age: Contemporary Philippine Cinema

June 01, 2017–June 25, 2017

 

MoMA presents a survey of Philippine cinema from around 2000 to the present, a period known as the Third Golden Age of Philippine cinema (following the first golden age, in the 1950s, and the second, from the 1970s to the early 1980s). The Philippines’ current wave of sustained creativity is unusual in its diversity of genre and style, audacious formal experimentation, and multiplicity of personal/social/political perspectives. Defying simple description, this dizzying array of distinct cinematic statements makes it an exceptionally unique, vibrant movement. From Lav Diaz’s minimalist tales rendered at epic lengths or Brillante Mendoza’s gritty realist portrayals of the margins of society, to Raya Martin’s experimentation with storytelling and form, Ditsi Carolino’s stark documentaries following the disenfranchised, and Erik Matti’s riveting thrillers, contemporary Filipino filmmakers are pushing cinematic boundaries and heating up the global film scene.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Tess Rances and Vicky Belarmino of Cinemalaya, Gil Quito, Huei-Yin Chen, and intern Dalin Liu.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

Share

Modern Matinees: Becoming Jennifer Jones

June 01, 2017–June 30, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Phylis Lee Isley was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1919 to parents who operated a traveling tent show. Isley’s education extended to Northwestern University and the American Academy for Dramatic Arts in New York City, where she met actor and future husband Robert Walker in 1939. Before Hollywood called, Isley and Walker returned to Tulsa to find steady work on radio programs. When the couple finally arrived in Hollywood, there was limited work, with stardom years away.

Ready to return to the theater, Isley auditioned at the New York offices of David O. Selznick for an out-of-town run of Rose Franken’s comedy Claudia. Insecure and inexperienced, she left the producer’s office distraught and unaware that Selznick—who had purchased the film rights to the play—had overheard her audition. In short order, he offered Isley a movie contract with his production company.

Ever the genius producer, Selznick took control of Isley’s nascent career, transforming her into “Jennifer Jones.” What Jones needed next was a prominent role in a high profile picture, and The Song of Bernadette (1943) could not have been a more ideal showcase for her metamorphosis. When Jones was cast as the peasant girl who has visions of the Virgin Mary, Selznick kept her away from the press, photographers, and, legend has it, the film’s premiere, in order to retain the illusion of her youth, chastity, and inscrutability. The newly minted Jennifer Jones walked away with that year’s Best Actress Oscar.

King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946) was another defining moment. Cast as a Native American/Caucasian woman who enters the lives of two brothers living on a remote Arizona ranch, Jones was uneasy about her character’s brazen sexuality—as were the censors. Nonetheless, the film went on to great success and earned Jones another of her five Academy Award nominations.

Becoming Jennifer Jones, our glimpse at the evolution of a great American actress, features a selection of films drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Share

Inbox: Charles Atlas: The Illusion of Democracy

June 03, 2017–July 30, 2017

Exhibition Galleries, Second Floor

Throughout his forty-year career, the groundbreaking filmmaker and video artist Charles Atlas (American, born 1949) has collaborated with key figures from a range of creative disciplines, expanding the relationships between visual art, dance, music, theater, and television. In the late 1970s, together with the choreographer Merce Cunningham, Atlas pioneered “media-dance,” in which dance works were created and performed specifically for the camera. Atlas’s experimental narrative works from the 1980s integrate fiction and documentary with vibrant, stylized portraits of urban subcultures.

With his trilogy The Illusion of Democracy (2008–12), Atlas has abandoned the presence of human bodies in favor of numerical figures, animating a constantly expanding and contracting universe based on six digits. Casting 1 through 6 as the protagonists of these intricately choreographed video installations, Atlas pushes the limits of their “numberness” and evokes the pervasiveness of mathematical algorithms in our increasingly technologized society. In Plato’s Alley (2008), pulsing vertical and horizontal white lines take shape as a grid populated by the ensemble, and in Painting by Numbers (2011), a sea of digits swells and subsides over six acts that culminate in a climactic finale. In 143652 (2012), bars of color slowly yet relentlessly scan back and forth, at once erasing and transforming each figure. With its methodical abstraction and politically suggestive title, the trilogy is an introspective study in order and chaos.    

Charles Atlas has collaborated on the design of the exhibition Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, currently on view in the fourth-floor Collection Galleries.

Share

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, June 8, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow in theater. Remarks will be livestreamed.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise nearly 400 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, and photographs, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Share

Beyond the Frame: International Cinema by Magnum Photographers

June 24, 2017–July 01, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Magnum Photos, established in 1947 by Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and others as an independent cooperative of photographers, has produced some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. On the occasion of Magnum’s 70th anniversary, this program explores the agency’s rich relationship to cinema through the lens of travelogues and art films. The artists represented here used moving images as an extension or counterpart to their photographic work to develop personal and auteurist storytelling. Expanding on the agency’s transatlantic history, Beyond the Frame spotlights work centered on Africa, Latin America, the US, and Europe, from the 1960s to the present. Photojournalism, fiction, and avant-garde media are alternately at play in the diverse treatments of conflict, social issues, and everyday moments. With selections from the agency’s Magnum Eye (1991–93) and Magnum in Motion (2004–today) initiatives, the series also investigates the technological and artistic transition from narrative cinema to video, and finally, to contemporary creators operating in a hybrid and online media field. Born out of the Second World War, Magnum’s vibrant and independent platform is as essential as ever, allowing both the social role and transcendent artistic quality of images to flourish. For screening details, please visit moma.org/film.

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Magnum Photos and Susan Meiselas.

Share

MoMA Presents: Filipa César’s Spell Reel

June 27, 2017–July 03, 2017

 

“The first image is in black and white, upside down and projected into a black box that then becomes the frame. It now hovers like a time capsule near a man’s face. He looks down, listening in on a female guerrilla fighter and translating her words from Fulani. Within the capsule, money is counted and paid out as a new currency, the numbers of the years run backwards in the black box. A 16-mm film glides through the man’s hands and is transferred to a laptop screen frame by frame.

Filipa César’s Spell Reel is the result of a multifaceted research and digitisation project that she initiated in 2011 with Sana na N’Hada and Flora Gomes. Having studied film in Cuba, the two began using the camera to observe the fight for independence in Guinea-Bissau (1963–74). After the decaying visual and audio material was digitised in Berlin, the filmmakers travelled with a mobile cinema to the places where the footage had originally been shot and showed it to audiences for the first time, adding their own commentary. They then moved on, also returning to Berlin. Spell Reel watches an archive at work to produce the present” (2017 Berlin International Film Festival notes).

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

Spell Reel. 2017. Germany/Portugal/France/Guinea-Bissau. Directed by Filipa César. In Portuguese, Fula, Guinea-Bissau Creole, English, French; English subtitles. 96 min.
Tue, Jun 27, 7:00 T1; Wed, Jun 28, 7:00 T2; Thu, Jun 29, 7:00 T2; Fri, Jun 30, 7:30 T1; Sat, Jul 1, 7:00 T2; Sun, Jul 2, 2:00 T2; Mon, Jul 3, 4:00 T2

Share

Landmark 20th Season of Warm Up Begins July 1

July 01, 2017–September 02, 2017

 

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up celebrates its 20th season in 2017, with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music—both local and global—across a range of genres. Warm Up 2017 begins on Saturday, July 1 and runs through Saturday, September 2, featuring a to-be-announced lineup of emerging and established artists as part of an ambitious and wide-ranging program.

Advance tickets are now available for all Warm Up 2017 dates. In celebration of Warm Up’s founding year, MoMA PS1 will offer a special “1998” ticket package providing access to all ten dates for only $98, available for a limited time only. Full ticketing information can be found within the full press release, in the press kit section of this page, or at mo.ma/warmup .

Over its 20 seasons, Warm Up has featured more than 750 artists, including pop artists Solange, Jamie XX, and Grimes, experimental musicians Arca, Black Dice, and Four Tet, and legendary DJs like DJ Premier, Ritchie Hawtin, and Derrick May. One of the longest-running music programs within a museum, Warm Up has a history of supporting seminal artists before they come to prominence and providing a platform for experimentation, unique collaborations, and new material. 

Share

Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), has an accumulative, rotating membership of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these “installation based experiences [issued] from an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” The Lone Wolf Recital Corps’ performances, which Adkins orchestrated with the collaborative improvisation of the Corps, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as John Brown, John Coltrane, Matthew Henson, Bessie Smith, and others.

Projects 107 will be the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. Conceived as a series of live performances by the reconstituted Corps, a changing group of artists will reprise selections from the group’s repertoire in an installation of Adkins’ sculptures. The exhibition will be supplemented by documentary video of earlier recitals, as well as performance props, costumes, and ephemera that trace the history of the Corps.

Projects 107 will bring together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians, including Sanford Biggers, Don Byron, Jean-Paul Bourelly, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Demetrius Oliver, Cavassa Nickens, Clifford Owens, Kamau Patton, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Robert Wisdom, Tukufu Zuberi, and others.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Share

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,400 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 220 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available now in process at moma.org/bourgeoisprints, and ultimately documenting over 4,600 printed sheets in all.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to The Easton Foundation for its longstanding support of the Louise Bourgeois print archive at The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

 

Share

Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Six, Exhibition Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the wide range of relationships between clothing and functionality, culture, aesthetics, politics, labor, economy, and technology in the exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern? In examining the ways in which wearable items are designed, manufactured, distributed, and used, the exhibition will present a selection of 111 examples of garments, footwear, and accessories that have had a strong impact on history and society in the 20th and 21st centuries, and continue to hold currency today. Comprised of examples as well-known, universal, and transformative as Levi’s 501 jeans and the bikini; as coveted as the Prada nylon backpack and the Hermès Birkin bag; and as culturally charged and historically rich as the Pashmina shawl, the dashiki, the kippah, and the keffiyeh, the exhibition will allow viewers to explore the influence of these items and their designers on Western culture over many decades.

Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition will present items along three tiers: archetype, stereotype, and prototype. In the installation, each item will be presented in the incarnation that made it significant in the last 100 (or so) years—the stereotype—accompanied by contextual material tracing back to its historical archetypes. In some cases, when innovation, opportunity, or necessity call for it, the item will be complemented by a new commission, or prototype. Thus, within the exhibition, designers, artists, scientists, engineers, and manufacturers will be invited to respond to some of these “indispensable items” with pioneering materials, approaches, and design revisions—extending this conversation into the near and distant future, and connecting the history of these garments with their present recombination and use.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at medium.com/items. The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at mo.ma/items. It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Share