Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

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Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 27, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 280 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, the exhibition, which will be seen in its entirety only at The Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor—the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The retrospective will provide an in-depth review of the full range of Piper’s work in diverse mediums: works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sound, and photo/text-based graphics spanning over five decades. Accompanying the exhibition will be a catalogue including essays by Christophe Cherix, Connie Butler, David Platzker, and Adrian Piper; and a reader with essays by Diarmuid Costello, Jörg Heiser, Kobena Mercer, Nizan Shaked, Vid Simoniti, and Elvan Zabunyan  – both published by the Museum; and a new autobiographical text by Piper published by the APRA Foundation Berlin. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over ten years and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist at the 56thVenice Biennale in 2015. 
 
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
 
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
 
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; David Platzker, Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
 

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and Lannan Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Marilyn and Larry Fields, and by Marieluise Hessel Artzt.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Julia Phillips: Failure Detection

April 15, 2018–September 10, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York–based artist Julia Phillips (b. 1985, German), featuring newly commissioned major works in combination with existing sculptures. Primarily working with ceramics, Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures mostly avoid direct figuration, however, and instead propose various interventions into and support structures for the body, emphasizing its absence from the works. Impressions of the human form are visible through elements like casts of orifices, handprints, and other traces, which indicate particular bodily placements in relation to her forms. While suggestive of functions that are overtly physical, these works also extend to the social and psychological. For Phillips, the body is entangled in the real and abstract spaces of politics, evident through indications given in her arrangements as well as the works’ titles, which are often directives for specific actions.

Julia Phillips (b. 1985, Hamburg, Germany) lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg. Phillips will also be included in the forthcoming New Museum Triennial.

Organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Projects 108: Gauri Gill

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the US premiere of photographer Gauri Gill’s most recent body of work, Acts of Appearance, a series of vivid color photographs for which the artist worked closely with members of an Adivasi community in Jawhar district, Maharashtra, India. Renowned for their papier-mâché objects, including traditional sacred masks, Gill’s collaborator-subjects wear masks made to represent living individuals as they engage in everyday village activities. A confluence of scenarios and narratives, situated across “reality” and dreamlike states, come together in the photographs, which at once portray the familiar experiences of community members as well as symbolic or playful representations against the backdrop of their home and culture. Acts of Appearance is presented alongside a selection of Gill’s older photographs from the series Notes from the Desert, reflecting upon the echoes between works made over several years in different locations across India, and emphasizing her sustained engagement with rural communities and local artists.

Trained as a painter and applied artist, Gill (b. 1970, Chandigarh, India) received a BFA from the Delhi College of Art, and then turned to photography as her primary medium, earning a second BFA from Parsons School of Design in New York and an MFA from Stanford University. In 2011, Gill received the Grange Prize (now known as the Aimia/AGO Photography prize). Her work has been presented internationally, including at documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, the 7th Moscow Biennale, and Prospect 4 in New Orleans, as well as at institutions including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Yale University Art Gallery; the Art Gallery of Ontario; and the Whitechapel Gallery, London; among others. She lives in New Delhi.

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund

April 24, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Two, Collection Galleries

A studio visit provides an opportunity for some of the most meaningful encounters, conversations, and exchanges between artists, friends, curators, and collectors. Agnes Gund—or “Aggie,” as she is affectionately known—is one of the most dedicated and steadfast of studio visitors, consistently inspired by the thrill of looking and talking with artists in the presence of their artworks. This exhibition celebrates Gund’s contributions as art patron, collector, and longtime Trustee of The Museum of Modern Art. The presentation pays tribute to the more than 700 works of art she has funded over the past half century. These gifts have come steadily and reliably during her decades of service as a key member of several departmental acquisition committees and her tenure as the Museum’s President from 1991 to 2002.

Gund is committed to supporting a vast range of artists, from celebrated figures she counts among her close friends to emerging talents whose work she champions. “My friendships with artists,” she has said, “as well as a sensitivity to the challenges facing women artists and artists of color, have been formative in shaping my collection, which is deeply personal and deeply autobiographical.” The exhibition will reflect the depth of her collecting by bringing together a broad-ranging group of artworks from the 1950s to today in a non-chronological display that sets visitor favorites, seldom seen works, and recent acquisitions in dialogue with one another. While presenting only a small fraction of the works Gund has given to MoMA, the presentation aims to prove that our collection would not be what it is today without her deeply held convictions and unparalleled generosity.

Organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

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Bodys Isek Kingelez

May 26, 2018–October 21, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

MoMA presents a full retrospective of Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015), the Congolese sculptor who worked with paper, commercial packaging, and materials from everyday life to create what he called “extreme maquettes” that encompass civic buildings, public monuments, and private pavilions. Bodys Isek Kingelez will span Kingelez’s career overthree decades, ranging from early works that were included in the landmark 1989 exhibition Magiciens de la terre at the Centre Pompidou, to his streamlined, dramatic forms of the 2000s. The first retrospective of Kingelez’s work and the first substantial monographic presentation of his work in the US, this exhibition will feature works from each of the key periods of his career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. Kingelez was previously featured in the MoMA exhibition Projects 59: Architecture as Metaphor (1997). Although his work has long been featured in major international exhibitions, this will be the first opportunity in New York to explore the full breadth of his career.

Accompanied by a scholarly catalogue with texts by Suzuki, architect David Adjaye, and art historian Chika Okeke-Agulu, among others, the exhibition will unfold as a chronological display with a thematic approach, bringing together a group of his earliest, never-before-seen sculptures, works made during the artist’s first trip to Paris in 1989, civic structures, public monuments, and fantastic takes on geographically-specific architectural tropes. The installation will capture his transition from single buildings to entire metropolises, culminating in a selection of Kingelez’s large-scale cities marked by soaring forms that characterize much of his late production. The exhibition will bring together rarely seen works from both public and private collections, including The Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection), Geneva; The Museum of Everything, London; and the Groninger Museum, Groningen, Netherlands.

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Exhibition design produced in collaboration with the artist Carsten Höller (German, born 1961).

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Reza Abdoh

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

Though he was only 32 at the time of his passing, the Iranian-American theater director Reza Abdoh’s (1963–95) mark on the world of theater was unmistakable. Relentlessly inventive, he pushed his actors—and audiences—to their limits amid ambitious, unusual, disorienting stage sets. Abdoh’s aesthetic language borrowed from fairy tales, BDSM, talk shows, raves, video art, and the history of avant-garde theater. The exhibition, the first large-scale retrospective of Abdoh’s work, will highlight the diverse video works that Abdoh produced for his performances and an installation based on his 1991 production Bogeyman. The exhibition also includes contextual materials reflecting the club scenes in both Los Angeles and New York, the culture wars of the Reagan era, and the AIDS crisis. Abdoh died of AIDS in 1995.  

Co-organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy for Bidoun. The exhibition is co-produced with the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, where it will be presented from February 2 to April 29, 2019 and organized in collaboration with Krist Gruijthuijsen, Director.

MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art

June 08, 2018–October 07, 2018

The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

In partnership with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne will present MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art as part of its Winter Masterpieces series. MoMA at NGV will provide a unique survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s iconic collection. Consisting of approximately 200 key works, arranged chronologically into eight thematic sections, the exhibition will trace the development of art and design from late-19th-century urban and industrial transformation, through to the digital and global present.

The emergence of a “new art” at the turn of the 20th century will be represented by some of MoMA’s earliest acquisitions, including masterworks by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne as well as an architectural model by Le Corbusier featured in MoMA’s first architecture exhibition in 1932. Works by pioneering Cubist and Futurist artists, including Pablo Picasso and Umberto Boccioni, will appear alongside the radically abstracted forms present in graphic design, furniture, and textiles from the Bauhaus and in works by artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian. The surreal visual language of paintings by artists like Salvador Dalí and Frida Kahlo and the spontaneity and tactility advanced in works by prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Alexander Calder and Jackson Pollock will also be included.

Developments in art from the 1960s to the 1980s, from Minimalism through Postmodernism, will be explored through the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Sol LeWitt, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring, among others. Significant works of late 20th-century and early 21st century art and design, including major pieces by Kara Walker, Rineke Dijkstra, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson, Huang Yong Ping, Mona Hatoum, El Anatsui and Camille Henrot, will foreground ideas around cultural and national identity, and mobility in a globalized world. Tomohiro Nishikado’s pioneering computer game Space Invaders and Shigetaka Kurita’s original set of 176 emoji will further complement the discussion of contemporary topics.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria.

Organized by Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Juliet Kinchin, Curator of Modern Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Miranda Wallace, Senior Curator, International Exhibition Projects, NGV.

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Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980

July 15, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, July 10, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the architecture of the former Yugoslavia with Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, the first major US exhibition to study the remarkable body of work that sparked international interest during the 45 years of the country’s existence. The exhibition will include more than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region, introducing the exceptional built work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience for the first time.

The architecture that emerged during this period—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist “social condensers”—is a manifestation of the radical pluralism, hybridity, and idealism that characterized the Yugoslav state itself. Exploring themes of large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture, Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature work by important architects, including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić. From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition will examine the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character.

Organized by Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and Vladimir Kulić, guest curator, with Anna Kats, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done

September 16, 2018–February 03, 2019

Floor Two, Contemporary Galleries and the Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

For a brief period in the early 1960s, a group of choreographers, visual artists, composers, and filmmakers made use of a local church to present performances that Village Voice critic Jill Johnston declared the most exciting new developments in dance in a generation. Redefining the kinds of movement that could count as dance, the Judson participants—Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Philip Corner, Bill Dixon, Judith Dunn, David Gordon, Alex Hay, Deborah Hay, Fred Herko, Robert Morris, Steve Paxton, Rudy Perez, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Rauschenberg, Carolee Schneemann, and Elaine Summers, among others—would go on to profoundly shape all fields of art in the second half of the 20th century. Taking its name from the Judson Memorial Church, a socially engaged Protestant congregation in New York’s Greenwich Village, Judson Dance Theater was organized as a series of open workshops from which its participants developed performances. Together, the artists challenged traditional understandings of choreography, expanding dance in ways that reconsidered its place in the world. They employed new compositional methods to strip dance of its theatrical conventions, incorporating “ordinary” movements—gestures typical of the street or home, for example, rather than a stage—into their work, along with games, simple tasks, and social dances to infuse their pieces with a sense of spontaneity.

Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done highlights the ongoing significance of the history of Judson Dance Theater, beginning with the workshops and classes led by Anna Halprin, Robert Ellis Dunn, and James Waring and exploring the influence of other figures working downtown such as Simone Forti and Andy Warhol, as well as venues for collective action like Judson Gallery and the Living Theatre. Through live performance and some 300 objects including film, photographic documentation, sculptural objects, scores, music, poetry, architectural drawings, and archival material, the exhibition celebrates the group’s multidisciplinary and collaborative ethos as well as the range of its participants. The Work Is Never Done includes a gallery exhibition, a print publication, and an ambitious performance program in the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium.

The exhibition is organized by Ana Janevski, Curator, and Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

Leadership support is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Major support for the exhibition and publication is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

 

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Charles White: A Retrospective

October 07, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

With Charles White: A Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago present the first major museum exhibition of Charles White’s oeuvre in over 30 years, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 7, 2018, through January 13, 2019. Covering the full breadth of his career with over 100 multidisciplinary works, the exhibition features drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, and contextual ephemera. Prior to its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will be on view at the Art Institute of Chicago from June 8 through September 3, 2018. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019.

Beginning in the late 1930s and concluding with White’s premature death in 1979, the exhibition features a detailed overview of his work over a four-decade span of enormous change in the US that provided a constant wellspring of subject matter for the artist. The presentation reveals White as a responsive visual strategist who was open to exploring styles and techniques inspired by contemporary art and culture, and a savvy interpreter of an evolving political climate. White’s commitment to figuration, to directly addressing the social and political concerns of his time, and to mastering mediums that allowed for wide circulation of his art established him as a major figure, and one with significant influence on his peers and followers.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section will be supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

Charles White: A Retrospective is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Sarah Kelly Oehler, Field-McCormick Chair and Curator of American Art, Art Institute of Chicago.

Charles White: A Retrospective is part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

The exhibition is supported at The Museum of Modern Art and Art Institute of Chicago by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

The Terra Foundation for American Art is dedicated to fostering exploration, understanding, and enjoyment of the visual arts of the United States for national and international audiences. Recognizing the importance of experiencing original works of art, the foundation provides opportunities for interaction and study, beginning with the presentation and growth of its own art collection in Chicago. To further cross-cultural dialogue on American art, the foundation supports and collaborates on innovative exhibitions, research, and educational programs. Implicit in such activities is the belief that art has the potential both to distinguish cultures and to unite them.

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