Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA & MoMA PS1

Please note that exhibitions are subject to change. 

Click here for a list of our touring or off-site exhibitions. 

Check the Press Release Archives for past exhibitions.

High-resolution images for publication are available through our password-protected Press Access.
Print-Friendly Schedule

Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures, Part 2

August 09, 2018–August 23, 2018

 

Continuing our celebration of the Republic Pictures library, which is currently being restored and returned to wide distribution by Paramount, here are 16 more rarely seen titles, each handpicked by Martin Scorsese. The program opens with a rare Republic A-picture, Edward Ludwig’s dreamlike South Seas romance Wake of the Red Witch(1948), with John Wayne and Gail Russell, and includes Republic’s 1953 Trucolor follow-up, Fair Wind to Java(Joseph Kane, 1953)—a Scorsese favorite starring Fred McMurray and Vera Ralston, in a 35mm restoration from The Film Foundation.

Other filmmakers to be highlighted include John H. Auer (I, Jane Doe, 1948), William A. Seiter (Make Haste to Live, 1954), William Witney (The Outcast, 1954), Bernard Vorhaus (Three Faces West, 1940), Anthony Mann (Strangers in the Night, 1944), Herbert Wilcox (Laughing Anne, 1953), Allan Dwan (Surrender, 1950), and Frank Borzage (Moonrise, 1948). This series is presented in association with The Film Foundation and Paramount Pictures.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

 

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MoMA Presents: Michelle Memran’s The Rest I Make Up

August 23, 2018–August 29, 2018

 

Maria Irene Fornes is one of America’s greatest playwrights and most influential teachers, but many only know her as the ex-lover of writer and social critic Susan Sontag. The visionary Cuban-American dramatist constructed astonishing worlds onstage and taught countless students how to connect with their imaginations. When she gradually stops writing due to dementia, an unexpected friendship with filmmaker Michelle Memran reignites her spontaneous creative spirit and triggers a decade-long collaboration that picks up where the pen left off. 

The duo travels from New York to Havana, Miami to Seattle, exploring the playwright’s remembered past and their shared present. Theater luminaries such as Edward Albee, Ellen Stewart, Lanford Wilson, and others weigh in on Fornes’s important contributions. What began as an accidental collaboration becomes a story of love, creativity, and connection that persists even in the face of forgetting.

 

The Rest I Make Up. 2018. USA. Directed by Michelle Memran. 75 min.

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MoMA Presents: Emmanuel Gras’s Makala

August 24, 2018–August 30, 2018

 

Gras’s transfixing road movie and Cannes Film Festival prizewinner follows a young Congolese man named Kabwita through the making, transporting, and selling of charcoal—from the felling of a tree to pushing a teetering bicycle weighed down with bulging sacks along treacherous dirt roads to contending with motorists, extortionists, and potential customers. As Gras observes Kabwita’s perilous trade, he derives beauty from the monumental efforts that go into his day-to-day existence. Makala is a documentary that resembles a neorealist parable, locating an epic dimension in the humblest of existences. A Kino Lorber release.

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Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done

September 16, 2018–February 03, 2019

Floor Two, Contemporary Galleries and the Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

For a brief period in the early 1960s, a group of choreographers, visual artists, composers, and filmmakers made use of a local church to present performances that Village Voice critic Jill Johnston declared the most exciting new developments in dance in a generation. Redefining the kinds of movement that could count as dance, the Judson participants—Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Philip Corner, Bill Dixon, Judith Dunn, David Gordon, Alex Hay, Deborah Hay, Fred Herko, Robert Morris, Steve Paxton, Rudy Perez, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Rauschenberg, Carolee Schneemann, and Elaine Summers, among others—would go on to profoundly shape all fields of art in the second half of the 20th century. Taking its name from the Judson Memorial Church, a socially engaged Protestant congregation in New York’s Greenwich Village, Judson Dance Theater was organized as a series of open workshops from which its participants developed performances. Together, the artists challenged traditional understandings of choreography, expanding dance in ways that reconsidered its place in the world. They employed new compositional methods to strip dance of its theatrical conventions, incorporating “ordinary” movements—gestures typical of the street or home, for example, rather than a stage—into their work, along with games, simple tasks, and social dances to infuse their pieces with a sense of spontaneity.

Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done highlights the ongoing significance of the history of Judson Dance Theater, beginning with the workshops and classes led by Anna Halprin, Robert Ellis Dunn, and James Waring and exploring the influence of other figures working downtown such as Simone Forti and Andy Warhol, as well as venues for collective action like Judson Gallery and the Living Theatre. Through live performance and some 300 objects including film, photographic documentation, sculptural objects, scores, music, poetry, architectural drawings, and archival material, the exhibition celebrates the group’s multidisciplinary and collaborative ethos as well as the range of its participants. The Work Is Never Done includes a gallery exhibition, a print publication, and an ambitious performance program in the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium.

The exhibition is organized by Ana Janevski, Curator, and Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Leadership support is provided by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw and by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Major support for the exhibition and publication is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art and The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Charles White: A Retrospective

October 07, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

With Charles White: A Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago present the first major museum exhibition of Charles White’s oeuvre in over 30 years, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 7, 2018, through January 13, 2019. Covering the full breadth of his career with over 100 multidisciplinary works, the exhibition features drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, and contextual ephemera. Prior to its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will be on view at the Art Institute of Chicago from June 8 through September 3, 2018. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019.

Beginning in the late 1930s and concluding with White’s premature death in 1979, the exhibition features a detailed overview of his work over a four-decade span of enormous change in the US that provided a constant wellspring of subject matter for the artist. The presentation reveals White as a responsive visual strategist who was open to exploring styles and techniques inspired by contemporary art and culture, and a savvy interpreter of an evolving political climate. White’s commitment to figuration, to directly addressing the social and political concerns of his time, and to mastering mediums that allowed for wide circulation of his art established him as a major figure, and one with significant influence on his peers and followers.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section will be supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

Charles White: A Retrospective is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Sarah Kelly Oehler, Field-McCormick Chair and Curator of American Art, Art Institute of Chicago.

Charles White: A Retrospective is part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

The exhibition is supported at The Museum of Modern Art and Art Institute of Chicago by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

The Terra Foundation for American Art is dedicated to fostering exploration, understanding, and enjoyment of the visual arts of the United States for national and international audiences. Recognizing the importance of experiencing original works of art, the foundation provides opportunities for interaction and study, beginning with the presentation and growth of its own art collection in Chicago. To further cross-cultural dialogue on American art, the foundation supports and collaborates on innovative exhibitions, research, and educational programs. Implicit in such activities is the belief that art has the potential both to distinguish cultures and to unite them.

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Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts

October 21, 2018–February 18, 2019

The Museum of Modern Art, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor, and MoMA PS1

The exhibition is on view at The Museum of Modern Art October 21, 2018–February 18, 2019, and at MoMA PS1 October 21, 2018–February 25, 2019.

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 will collaborate on the first comprehensive retrospective in 25 years devoted to the work of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941). Co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art and Schaulager Basel, Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts will draw upon the rich holdings of both institutions and over 70 lenders. Encompassing Nauman’s entire career, the exhibition will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the whole of MoMA PS1. This joint presentation will provide an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and neon to performance, video, film, sculpture, and architecturally scaled environments. The exhibition’s title refers to the manifold appearances of disappearance in the artist’s work. For Nauman, disappearance is both a real phenomenon and an ample metaphor for grappling with the anxieties of both the creative process and of navigating the everyday world.

Since 1970, Nauman has frequently worked on a monumental scale, necessitating this expansive presentation across both of MoMA’s locations. Both venues include works in all mediums and from all phases of Nauman’s career, offering distinct but complementary perspectives on his wide-ranging practice. The characteristics of the two spaces have shaped the curatorial approach to each: the flexibility of The Museum of Modern Art’s sixth-floor exhibition galleries will accommodate six of the artist’s largest works, alongside a representative selection of his production across the decades; while the suite of former classrooms in MoMA PS1’s historic building will house over 120 works in a more traditional retrospective format. At The Museum of Modern Art, the exhibition moves swiftly from Nauman’s early work examining his own body to works that directly involve the viewer, who must navigate a series of room-sized installations that dictate movement and stress the senses. At MoMA PS1, Disappearing Acts will unfold chronologically, but with strategic interruptions to highlight consistencies in a seemingly disparate body of work, as Nauman revisits earlier motifs and concerns with new urgency.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel.

The exhibition is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Laurenz Foundation Curator and Advisor to the Director, The Museum of Modern Art; with Heidi Naef, Chief Curator, and Isabel Friedli, Curator, Schaulager Basel; and Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by the Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel.

Leadership support is provided by The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Generous funding is provided by The Hayden Family Foundation, Sully Bonnelly and Robert R. Littman, Ellen and William Taubman, and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund and by The Museum of Modern Art’s Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, and Karen and Gary Winnick.

 

 

 

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