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Never Alone: Video Games and Other Interactive Design

September 10, 2022 – Spring 2023

The Museum of Modern Art

The Museum of Modern Art announces Never Alone: Video Games and Other Interactive Design, an exhibition that will investigate how interactive design informs the way we move through life and conceive of space, time, and connections, well beyond the game screen. On view in the Museum’s street-level gallery from September 10, 2022, through spring 2023, the exhibition will bring together notable examples of interactive design from MoMA’s collection, including computer interfaces, icons, apps, and 35 video games, 10 of which visitors will be able to play. This exhibition is grounded in the Museum’s history and commitment to collecting interactive design, from 1960s computer terminals to MoMA’s first selection of video games (acquired in 2012) to the websites of today.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Paul Galloway, Collection Specialist, and Anna Burckhardt, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

 

The exhibition is made possible by Allianz, MoMA’s partner for design and innovation, and supporter of programs that look to a more sustainable future.

Leadership contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund, in support of the Museum’s collection and collection exhibitions, are generously provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, the Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Eva and Glenn Dubin, the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi Haas, the Noel and Harriette Levine Endowment, The David Rockefeller Council, the William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, the Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Anne Dias, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Kenneth C. Griffin, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder.

Major contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund are provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, and Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro.

Press Kit

Images

Important: By downloading images you are agreeing to the following permissions: Images are provided exclusively to the press, and only for purposes of publicity of The Museum of Modern Art's and MoMA PS1's current and upcoming exhibitions, programs, and news announcements. Permission to use images is granted only to the extent of the Museum's and MoMA PS1's ownership rights relating to those images—the responsibility for any additional permissions remains solely with the party reproducing the images. The images must be accompanied by the credit line and any copyright information as it appears above, and the party reproducing the images must not distort or mutilate the images.

Ray Tomlinson. @. 1971. Here displayed in ITC American Typewriter Medium, the closest approximation to the character used by a Model 33 Teletype in the early 1970s

Ralph Baer. Magnavox Odyssey. 1972. Various materials. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of The Aaron and Betty Lee Stern Foundation

Toru Iwatani. Pac-Man. 1980. Video game software. Published by NAMCO LTD. (currently BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc.). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. PAC-MAN TM & © 1980 BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc.

Howard Scott Warshaw. Yar’s Revenge. 1982. Video game software. Published by Atari, Inc., USAThe Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Atari Interactive, Inc. © 2022 Atari, Inc.

Will Wright, Maxis Inc, and Electronic Arts. SimCity 2000. 1993. Video game software. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2022 Electronic Arts

Tarn Adams and Zach Adams. Dwarf Fortress. 2006. Video game software.The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the designers.  © 2022 Tarn Adams

Zach Lieberman, James Powderly, Evan Roth, Chris Sugrue, TEMPT1, Theo Watson. EyeWriter. openFrameworks and custom software, eyeglasses, PlayStation Eye camera, IR pass filter, IR LEDs, battery clip, resistor, zip ties, and flexible metal wire, 7 7/8 x 5 7/8 x 1 15/16″ (20 x 15 x 5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Architecture & Design Purchase Fund

Markus “Notch” Persson. Minecraft. 2011. Video game software. Published by Mojang. The Museum of Modern Art. New York. © 2022 Mojang

Jenova Chen (Xinghan) Chen. Flower. 2012. Video game software. Published by thatgamecompany. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Sony Interactive Entertainment LLC. © 2008 Sony Interactive Entertainment LLC. “Flower” is a registered trademark of Sony Interactive Entertainment LLC. Developed by thatgamecompany

Lucas Pope. Papers, Please. 2013. Video game software. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the designer. © 2022 Lucas Pope

Upper One Games, E-Line Media, and Ishmael Angaluuk Hope. Never Alone (Kisima Inŋitchuŋa). 2014. Video game software. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of E-Line Media. © 2022 E-Line Media

11 bit studios. This War of Mine. 2014. Video game software. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of 11 bit studios. © 2022 11 bit studios

Nathalie Lawhead. Everything Is Going to Be OK. 2017. Video game software. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist. © 2022 Nathalie Lawhead

Bennett Foddy. Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy. Video game software. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the designer. © 2022 Bennett Foddy

Susan Kare. Graphic icon sketch. Pencil and ink on gridded paper. 8 1/2 x 11″ (21.6 x 27.9 cm). Gift of the designer, jointly owned by the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. © 2018 Susan Kare