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Digital Offerings from The Museum of Modern Art

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and select MoMA Stores are temporarily closed.

 

The Museum of Modern Art’s digital content expands the essential mission of the Museum—to bring art and artists closer to audiences, offer entry points to MoMA and its collection wherever people’s knowledge of art lies, and foster curiosity and exploration. For decades, MoMA has embraced digital strategy as an incredible opportunity to open up its unparalleled collection of modern and contemporary art to the world. Between the Museum’s website, YouTube, and social media channels, MoMA has the largest digital audience of any museum, reaching 30+ million people worldwide.

 

The Museum’s evolving collection contains almost 200,000 works of modern and contemporary art with more than 84,000 works currently available online. Similarly, MoMA’s Exhibition History includes individual pages that contain digitized exhibition catalogues, installation photographs, press releases, and master checklists for more than 5000 exhibitions at MoMA and MoMA PS1.MoMA’s Education programs are inspired by the belief that art and ideas are the starting point for sparking curiosity that ignites new ideas, conversations, and creative explorations with people of all ages and abilities, at the museum and in locations across the world. MoMA has offered free massive open online courses on Coursera since 2012, and audiences can visit the MoMA Learning website or follow the Museum’s Education department @MoMALearning for more resources, activities, and information.

 

During this unprecedented time of staying home to stay safe, MoMA is sending out The Museum from Home, a new weekly newsletter that focuses on how people can enjoy art wherever they are, with special resources for families and teachers, and special projects like the recent Artist Project with Louise Lawler. In April, the Museum kicked off a series of online exhibitions called Virtual Views, offering a new at-home experience of MoMA taking audiences inside the Museum through video stories, curator Q&As, audio playlists, and feature articles.Anyone, anywhere in the world, can subscribe to MoMA’s digital newsletter or follow the Museum on Twitter or Instagram for the latest updates.

 

Images

Important: By downloading images you are agreeing to the following permissions: Images are provided exclusively to the press, and only for purposes of publicity of The Museum of Modern Art's and MoMA PS1's current and upcoming exhibitions, programs, and news announcements. Permission to use images is granted only to the extent of the Museum's and MoMA PS1's ownership rights relating to those images—the responsibility for any additional permissions remains solely with the party reproducing the images. The images must be accompanied by the credit line and any copyright information as it appears above, and the party reproducing the images must not distort or mutilate the images.

Still from Artist Story film with Sheila Hicks. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art

Still from Artist Story film with Sheila Hicks. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art

Still from Artist Story film with Rael San Fratello. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art

Still from Artist Story film with Rael San Fratello. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art

Home movies. Jarret family. USA. 1958-67. Digital preservation of Standard 8mm film. Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art.

Paul Signac. Opus 217. Against the Enamel of a Background Rhythmic with Beats and Angles, Tones, and Tints, Portrait of M. Félix Fénéon in 1890. 1890. Oil on canvas. 29 x 36 1/2″ (73.5 x 92.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller, 1991. Photo by Paige Knight. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Installation view of Judd, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 1–July 11, 2020. Digital Image © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Jonathan Muzikar

Dorothea Lange. Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California. March 1936. Gelatin silver print, 11 1/8 x 8 9/16″ (28.3 x 21.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

Louise Lawler. Still Life (Candle) (traced). 2003/2013. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Louise Lawler. Big (traced). 2002/2003/2016. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Louise Lawler. (Bunny) Sculpture and Painting (traced). 1999/2019. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Catalyst Program, The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Beatriz Meseguer/onwhitewall.com. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Catalyst Program, The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Beatriz Meseguer/onwhitewall.com. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Catalyst Program, The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Beatriz Meseguer/onwhitewall.com. © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

The Flying Train. 1902. Germany. Produced by Deutsche Mutoskop und Biograph G.m.b.H. The Museum of Modern Art. Film Stills Archive

Kiss. 1963–64. USA. Directed by Andy Warhol. Courtesy The Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. © The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved

Joan of Arc [Screen Test. Katharine Hepburn]. 1934. USA. Produced by Pioneer Pictures. The Museum of Modern Art. Film Stills Archive

Anémic cinéma. 1926. France. Directed by Marcel Duchamp, with Man Ray, Marc Allégret

Ballet mécanique. 1924. France. Directed by Fernand Léger, Dudley Murphy. Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art, Department of Imaging and Visual Resources

Chapman Films. 1934–43. USA. Directed by Mrs. Gilbert W. Chapman. Pictured: Salvador Dalí. Courtesy Robert Storr. The Museum of Modern Art. Film Stills Archive