Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA and MoMA PS1

Modern Mondays

Ongoing

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

Building upon the Museum’s eight-decade tradition of fostering cinematic innovation and experimentation, Modern Mondays invites artists working in the expanded field of film, video, performance, and sound to present their work in an intimate setting. A platform for both emerging artists and pioneering figures who have changed the way we think about the moving image, this series premieres new projects and rediscovers landmark works. Considering avant-garde narratives from the 21st century, the program also celebrates legacies of influential historical figures in a contemporary context. Each evening presents a unique opportunity for audiences to engage in dialogue with artists, along with curators and other guests.

Organized by the Department of Film and the Department of Media and Performance Art. 

 
Starship Troopers [plus rare production footage]. 1997. Directed by Paul Verhoeven
Monday, October 1, 3:30 p.m., T2
Starship Troopers [plus rare production footage]. 1997. USA. Directed by Paul Verhoeven. Creature Visual Effects Supervision by Phil Tippett. With Casper Van Dien, Denise Richards, Neil Patrick Harris. 129 min.In conjunction with his Modern Mondays discussion, visual effects and animation artist Phil Tippett presents this afternoon screening of Starship Troopers, along with 30 minutes of rare production footage.
 
Phil Tippett in Conversation with Lucy Raven
Monday, October 1, 7:00 p.m., T2
Two-time Academy Award–winning visual effects and animation artist Phil Tippett has brought his radical innovations in screen technology—and his imaginative wit—to the creation of an entire generation of fantastical movie creatures. A pioneer in the revolutionary transition from stop-motion animation to CGI in the Star Wars trilogy, Starship Troopers, Robocop and Robocop 2, Jurassic Park, and the Twilight saga, Tippett joins us to share his far-ranging career and inspirations (from Hieronymous Bosch to Tex Avery) through clips and an onstage conversation with the artist and filmmaker Lucy Raven and MoMA curator Joshua Siegel. The program features the work-in-progress premiere of his long-awaited independent project Mad God, his recent collaborations with Lucy Raven, and an afternoon screening of Starship Troopers, which he presents with 30 minutes of rare production footage.
 
An Evening with Monira al Qadiri
Monday, October 15, 7:00 p.m., T2
In this evening of film and conversation, organized as part of the MISK Art Institute’s citywide Arab Art and Education Initiative, Monira Al Qadiri presents a program of moving-image works centered on transnational narratives emanating from the Persian Gulf. A Kuwaiti artist born in Senegal and educated in Japan, Al Qadiri adopts a range of imaginative strategies to explore histories both personal and political. Arab soap operas, Gulf War–era images of burning Kuwaiti oil fields, traditional elegiac songs, and science fiction all figure in her astutely shape-shifting work, which foregrounds networks of capital and labor. Dark humor and melancholy alternatively drive the artist’s speculative, uncanny scenarios, which simultaneously look back at and probe possible futures for petrocultures and global political networks. This evening brings together works made over the last five years, including Al Qadiri’s most recent video The Craft (2017), in which malaise and fantasy animate the artist’s recasting of childhood memories in Kuwait as an alien invasion operating out of an American diner. The Craft’s sister work, the lecture-performance American Century: The End, will be performed in its US premiere. This live multimedia piece contemplates the convergence of international diplomacy, global consumerism, and cultural production through an ultimate emblem: American junk food.
 
An Evening with Shambhavi Kaul
Monday, October 22, 7:00 p.m., T2
Applying deep research, precise editing, and fine-tuned humor to a combination of her own cinematography and found footage, Shambhavi Kaul depicts landscapes and figures that exist between imagination and reality. Her work uses cultural tropes from places like Hong Kong, India, and Mexico to reveal the ambiguous meanings behind loaded popular signifiers. Kaul presents a selection of her films, including new work, followed by a conversation.
 
An Evening of Video by Stephen Varble
Monday, October 29, 7:00 p.m., T2
Scandalous, gender-bending street performances and “gutter art” costumes crafted from glittery detritus made Stephen Varble a notorious fixture of Soho art circles during the 1970s. Trained as a filmmaker and influenced by Jack Smith and Fluxus artist Geoffrey Hendricks, Varble gravitated toward antiestablishment public provocations, performances for camera, and his own audacious brand of makeshift glamor.
This evening features excerpts from Journey to the Sun with commentary by David Getsy, art historian and curator of the exhibition Rubbish and Dreams: The Genderqueer Performance Art of Stephen Varble, now on view at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art. A conversation between Getsy and Stuart Comer, chief curator of MoMA’s Department of Media and Performance Art, follows the screening.
 
An Evening with Marie Losier
Monday, November 5, 7:00 p.m., T2
In this intimate evening complementing the artist’s midcareer retrospective, Marie Losier presents a specially assembled program of unseen works, ranging from early personal films to footage from her many years documenting New York’s avant-garde film community and a preview of ongoing projects.
 
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VW Sunday Sessions Commission by Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste

October 21, 2018

MoMA PS1

On the occasion of the opening of Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts, artist, composer, and performer Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste will present a reinterpretation of Steve Reich’s seminal sculptural performance-composition Pendulum Music in response to Nauman’s work. Part of MoMA PS1’s free Fall Open House, the premiere of Pendulum Music: An Arrangement for Four Performers and Geodesic Dome will be presented at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to launch the VW Sunday Sessions performance series.

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The Long Run

November 11, 2017– Ongoing

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes what follows.  “The Long Run” provides an alternate view: by chronicling the continued experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking, persistent observation, and countless hours in the studio.  Each work in this presentation exemplifies an artist’s distinct evolution.  For some, this results from continually testing the boundaries of a given medium, for others it reflects the pressures of social, economic, and political circumstances.  Often, it is a combination of both.  “The Long Run” includes monographic galleries and rooms that bring together artists broad ranging in background and approach, drawn from MoMA’s collection.  All the artists in this presentation are united by a ceaseless desire to make meaningful work, year after year, across decades.  They include Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Joan Jonas, Ellsworth Kelly, Helen Levitt, Joan Mitchell, Georgia O’Keeffe, Frank Stella, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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MoMA Announces Major Gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

October 17, 2016

The Museum of Modern Art announced that it has received a major gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, which will add more than 100 works of modern art by major artists from Latin America to the Museum’s collection, and establish the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America. The Cisneros Institute will be dedicated to an expansive approach to the study and interpretation of modern and contemporary art from Latin America.

The gift includes 102 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, made between the 1940s and the 1990s by 37 artists working in Brazil, Venezuela, and the Río de la Plata region of Argentina and Uruguay, including Lygia Clark, Hélio Oiticica, Lygia Pape, Jesús Rafael Soto, Alejandro Otero, and Tomás Maldonado. They join 40 works previously given by Patricia and Gustavo Cisneros over the last 16 years; Mrs. Cisneros is a longtime MoMA Trustee and a member of several acquisitions and funding committees, including the Latin American and Caribbean Fund, of which she is chairman and founder.

The Cisneros Institute, to be located on MoMA’s Midtown Manhattan campus, will offer opportunities for curatorial research and travel, host visiting scholars and artists, convene an annual international conference, and produce research publications on art from Latin America. It is poised to become the preeminent research center in the field, building on MoMA’s history of collecting, exhibiting, and studying the art and artists of the region, dating back to 1931. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works by artists from Latin America.

The breadth of this gift is unprecedented, and the accompanying research initiative devoted to the study of the works and their integration into the overall narrative of modern art will greatly enrich MoMA’s collection and scholarly activities. As an integral program of The Museum of Modern Art, the Cisneros Institute represents a singular commitment to the region, and will foster intensive research on and engagement with the region’s art and artists.

For more information and a full list of works, please visit: www.moma.org/collection/works/groups/cisneros

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MoMA PS1 Building Images

Ongoing

Images of MoMA PS1’s building are located through Press Access.

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Warm Up 2018 Capsule Collection

6/22/18

In celebration of the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1 has created a capsule collection of custom merchandise to coincide with the celebrated music series. The collection features three items: a beach towel designed by Come Tees, a short-sleeve T-shirt designed by Andrew Kuo, and a long-sleeve T-shirt designed by Hassan Rahim. Each was produced by EVERYBODY.WORLD, and made in the United States.

Bringing together voices from a range of art and music communities, the collection is designed to commemorate Warm Up 2018, and celebrate the network of creatives that surrounds it.  The collection is priced from $35 to $75, and available in limited quantities. The collection will be available at the MoMA Design Store, Soho, online at store.moma.org, and on site at MoMA PS1 during Warm Up events.

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VW Sunday Sessions 2018-2019

Beginning October 21, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1’s VW Sunday Sessions will return beginning on October 21 with a series of live programs that foster the development of new work, highlight artistic process, and amplify the collectives and communities that create performance-based practice in New York City. Encompassing performance, music, dance, conversation, and film, VW Sunday Sessions features programs that respond to contemporary social and political issues through a wide variety of creative and critical lenses.

This season, the VW Sunday Sessions commissioning program will expand to present six new works from local and international emerging artists Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste, Doreen Garner, Jonathan González, NIC Kay, Sarah Kinlaw, and Klein, underscoring a commitment to the development and presentation of new performance work. Additionally, the VW Dome Artist Residency continues with participants including Moriah Evans, Laurel Atwell, and Jessica Cook. Now in its third year, this residency program for performance-based artists includes open studio events where the public can encounter artists’ works in progress.

Featuring a wide range of artists, curators, collectives, and activists, the current 2018-2019 schedule is now available, with additional programs to be announced as the season continues through April 2019.

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Touring and Off-Site Exhibitions

Ongoing

BRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
February 21–May 22, 2017

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (KNW), Düsseldorf, Germany
March 4–June 11, 2017

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from the Museum of Modern Art
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virgina
March 10–June 18, 2017

Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire
September 30–April 9, 2017

Robert Rauschenberg
Tate Modern, London, England
November 30, 2016–April 9, 2017

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
November 4, 2017–March 25, 2018

Masterworks from MoMA
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
June 8–October 7, 2018

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The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries, Fifth Floor

Ongoing

Fifth floor

The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries feature on the fifth floor roughly span the years 1880 to 1940. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Post-Impressionism, Cubism, the work of Henri Matisse, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, and Surrealism, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. 

Browse selected works on view.

 

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Young Architects Program International

Ongoing

With its international partnerships, Young Architects Program (YAP) offers selected young designers and architects across the globe the opportunity to create designs that promote diverse uses such as rest, play, and relaxation as well as hosting a series of live events such as shows, music, dance, exhibitions, and performances. In addition architects are encouraged to address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling, to create highly innovative projects that provide shade, seating, and water. To achieve these goals, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are currently partnering with the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI) in Rome, CONSTRUCTO in Chile, and Istanbul Modern in Turkey (on a biennial cycle).

In May 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul announced a new partnership that further expands the international YAP to South Korea. YAP Korea provides opportunities for emerging architects in South Korea to create temporary exterior installations for summer programming at the MMCA.

A dedicated YAP International website, MoMA.org/yap, features the selected proposals and designs from the winner of YAP International. The website also includes an archive of past MoMA/MoMA PS1 YAP finalists and winning proposals, interviews with the curators, and installation videos.

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Being: New Photography 2018

March 18, 2018–August 19, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 13, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art presents Being: New Photography 2018, the latest presentation in MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series. Since its inception in 1985, New Photography has introduced more than 100 artists from around the globe, and it is a key component of the Museum’s contemporary program. Every two years, New Photography presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human. On view from March 18 through August 19, 2018, the exhibition includes over 80 new and recent works by 17 artists from ten countries. While at various stages in their careers, all are presenting their work at the Museum for the first time.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology.

The artists included are:

Sofia Borges (Brazilian, born 1984)
Matthew Connors (American, born 1976)
Sam Contis (American, born 1982)
Shilpa Gupta (Indian, born 1976)
Adelita Husni-Bey (Italian, born 1985)
Yazan Khalili (Palestinian, born Syria, 1981)
Harold Mendez (American, born 1977)
Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopian, born 1974)
Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương (American, born Hong Kong, 1979; American, born 1976)
B. Ingrid Olson (American, born 1987)
Joanna Piotrowska (Polish, born 1985)
Em Rooney (American, born 1983)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya (American, born 1982)
Andrzej Steinbach (German, born Poland, 1983)
Stephanie Syjuco (American, born Philippines, 1974)
Carmen Winant (American, born 1983)

Being: New Photography 2018 is organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund , David Dechman and Michel Mercure, and The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Courtney Finch Taylor and by James G. Niven.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 290 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, this inclusive retrospective, which will be seen in its entirety only at the Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor – the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The exhibition will encompass the wide range of diverse mediums that Piper has explored for over 50 years: drawing, photography, works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sculpture, and sound. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over 10 years, and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist in the 56th Venice Biennale of 2015 and Germany’s Käthe Kollwitz Prize for 2018.
 
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
 
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
 
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and David Platzker, former Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
 

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and Lannan Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Marilyn and Larry Fields, and by Marieluise Hessel Artzt.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People

April 15, 2018–September 10, 2018

MoMA PS1 will present the first US solo museum exhibition of artist Fernando Palma Rodríguez (Mexican, b. 1957), on view from April 15 to September 10, 2018. Since the early 1990s, Palma Rodríguez has combined his training as an artist and mechanical engineer to create robotic sculptures that utilize custom software to perform complex, narrative choreographies. His works respond to issues facing indigenous communities in Mexico, addressing human and land rights, including the violent targeting of these communities, and urgent environmental crises. These concerns have particular significance to the district of Milpa Alta, an agricultural region outside of Mexico City where Palma Rodríguez lives and runs Calpulli Tecalco, a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of indigenous culture.

Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Special thanks to Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Oaxaca.

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Julia Phillips: Failure Detection

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Julia Phillips (German and American, b. 1985), featuring six newly commissioned major works alongside existing sculptures, on view from April 15 to September 3, 2018. Primarily working with ceramics, Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures mostly avoid direct figuration, instead proposing various support structures for the body and emphasizing its absence. Impressions of the human form are visible through casts of orifices, handprints, and other corporeal traces. While suggestive of particular functions and purposes that are overtly physical, these works also produce social and psychological resonances. For Phillips, the body is entangled in both the real and abstract spaces of politics, made evident through indications given in her arrangements as well as the works’ titles, which are often directives for specific actions.

Julia Phillips (b. 1985, Hamburg, Germany) lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg.

Julia Phillips: Failure Detection is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Projects 108: Gauri Gill

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the US premiere of photographer Gauri Gill’s (Indian, born 1970) most recent body of work, Acts of Appearance. Working closely with members of an Adivasi community in Jawhar district, Maharashtra, India, Gill created a series of vivid color photographs that foreground the community’s renowned production of papier-mâché objects, including traditional sacred masks. Projects 108: Gauri Gill is on view from April 15 through September 3, 2018, featuring Acts of Appearance alongside work from Gill’s series Notes from the Desert.

While traveling in Maharashtra, Gill heard about the Bahoda festival, a ritual celebration of performance and dance observed by members of the Kokna tribe. Over several nights, members of the community enact well-known Hindu epics intermingled with tribal myths, performed with the aid of papier-mâché masks that depict Hindu gods, local tribal gods and demons, and other characters. After seeing the masks, and reflecting upon the possible distance between these traditions and the everyday realities of the Jawhar community, Gill commissioned community members to create a new set of masks that, instead of depicting gods and deities, would take the form of familiar people and animals or valued objects. Many of the masks incorporate common aspects of human existence such as various life stages, states of health, and emotions (or rasas).

Trained as a painter and applied artist, Gill (b. 1970, Chandigarh, India) received a BFA from the Delhi College of Art, and then turned to photography as her primary medium, earning a second BFA from Parsons School of Design in New York and an MFA from Stanford University. In 2011, Gill received the Grange Prize (now known as the Aimia/AGO Photography prize). Her work has been presented internationally and in India, including at documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, the 7th Moscow Biennale, Prospect 4 in New Orleans, and Kochi Biennale, as well as at institutions including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Yale University Art Gallery; the Art Gallery of Ontario; the School of Arts and Aesthetics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi; and the Whitechapel Gallery, London; among others. She lives in New Delhi.

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

Land: Zhang Huan and Li Binyuan brings together a selection of performance works by two Chinese artists of different generations that address the relationship between the body and the land. Since the 1980s, the status of land in China has been undergoing radical transformation, mirroring shifts from collectivism to individualism and from socialism to capitalism. The exhibition juxtaposes videos and photographs of early performance works by Zhang Huan (Chinese, b. 1965) with those of more recent performances by Li Binyuan (Chinese, b. 1985).

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund

April 29, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Two, Collection Galleries

The exhibition, Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund, celebrates Gund’s contributions as a patron of the arts, a collector, and a longtime Trustee of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1. On view from April 29, 2018, through July 22, 2018, the presentation pays tribute to the more than 800 works of art she has funded over the past half century. These gifts have come steadily and reliably during her decades of service as a key member of several departmental acquisition committees and her tenure as the Museum’s President from 1991 to 2002.

A studio visit provides an opportunity for some of the most meaningful encounters, conversations, and exchanges between artists, friends, curators, and collectors. Agnes Gund—or “Aggie,” as she is affectionately known—is one of the most dedicated and steadfast of studio visitors, consistently inspired by the thrill of looking and talking with artists in the presence of their artworks. Gund is committed to supporting a vast range of artists, from celebrated figures she counts among her close friends to emerging talents whose work she champions. “My friendships with artists,” she has said, “as well as a sensitivity to the challenges facing women artists and artists of color, have been formative in shaping my collection, which is deeply personal and deeply autobiographical.” The exhibition will reflect the depth of her collecting by bringing together a broad-ranging group of artworks from the 1950s to today in a non-chronological display that sets visitor favorites, seldom seen works, and recent acquisitions in dialogue with one another. Presenting a selection of 55 works Gund has given to MoMA, the exhibition shows that our collection would not be what it is today without her deeply held convictions and unparalleled generosity.

In celebration of her more than 50 years of involvement with the Museum, MoMA’s Party in the Garden will honor Ms. Gund, on May 31. In 1967, she first joined MoMA’s International Council and served on the Museum’s Board of Trustees from 1976 until 2002. Since 2002, she has served as president emerita and currently sits as chairman of the Board of Directors for MoMA PS1. Ms. Gund’s dedication and generous philanthropy to the arts community also extends beyond the Museum to other organizations such as Studio in a School, the Cleveland Museum of Art, National Young Arts Foundation, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Center for Curatorial Leadership, and the Art for Justice Fund, to name only a few.

Organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture. Special thanks to Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Alice and Tom Tisch, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Franz Wassmer, Karen and Gary Winnick, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Bodys Isek Kingelez: City Dreams

May 26, 2018–January 01, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

“Without a model, you are nowhere. A nation that can’t make models is a nation that doesn’t understand things, a nation that doesn’t live,” said visionary artist Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015). Based in then-Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo), following its independence from Belgium, Kingelez made sculptures of imagined buildings and cities that reflected dreams for his country, his continent, and the world. Kingelez’s “extreme maquettes” offer fantastic, utopian models for a more harmonious society of the future. An optimistic alternative to his own experience of urban life in his home city of Kinshasa, which grew exponentially and organically with urban planning and infrastructure often unable to keep step, his work explores urgent questions around urban growth, economic inequity, how communities and societies function, and the rehabilitative power of architecture—issues that resonate profoundly today.

Kingelez’s vibrant, ambitious sculptures are created from an incredible range of everyday materials and found objects—colored paper, commercial packaging, plastic, soda cans, and bottle caps—all meticulously repurposed and arranged. While he didn’t travel outside of Zaire until 1989, he was highly attuned to world events and deeply concerned with social issues. The Scientific Center of Hospitalisation the SIDA (1991), for example, references the AIDS crisis; Palais d’Hirochima (1991) addresses the condtion of postwar Japan; and U.N. (1995) attests to the organization’s global peacekeeping efforts and the artist’s own sense of civic responsibility. In the complex multi-building cityscape Kimbembele Ihunga (1994), the artist reimagines his agricultural home village complete with a soccer stadium, banks, restaurants, and skyscrapers. In Ville Fantôme (1996), which will be accompanied by a Virtual Reality experience for visitors, the artist has imagined a peaceful city in which doctors and police are not needed.

The first US retrospective of Kingelez’s work, the exhibition spans his full career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. These rarely shown works are a call for us all to imagine, in the artist’s words, a “better, more peaceful world.”

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Exhibition design is produced in collaboration with the artist Carsten Höller.

Special thanks to Jean Pigozzi and CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection.

The exhibition is made possible by Allianz, a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Reza Abdoh

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first major retrospective of pioneering theater director and playwright Reza Abdoh (Iranian-American, 1963–95), who was one of the most compelling figures in American experimental theater when he died of AIDS-related complications in 1995 at only 32 years old. Abdoh’s provocative and challenging work confronted the humanitarian catastrophe of the AIDS epidemic and the culture wars of the Reagan era, investigating a range of urgent social issues that remain equally relevant today, including those surrounding sexual orientation, gender, race, class, and privilege.

Co-organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy for Bidoun. The exhibition is co-produced with the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, where it will be presented from February 2 to April 29, 2019 and organized in collaboration with Krist Gruijthuijsen, Director.

Body Armor

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

The four artists in Body Armor—Maryam Hoseini, Zadie Xa, Delilah Montoya, and Ana Pellicer—present approaches to bodily adornment in contemporary life, placing focus on the garments and objects we wear to signal belonging, confer status, or project strength. Wearable ornaments have distinguished their owners for centuries across global cultures, embellishing appearance, granting access, and enhancing power. These distinctive markers allow individuals to move fluidly through a range of identities, operating as instruments of social influence that participate in a shared cultural language predicated on existing hierarchies and stereotypes.

Body Armor reimagines these adornments, and critiques the traditional, often colonial, contexts in which they are deployed. Pushing the boundaries of how we construe femininity across a range of cultures, geographies, and generations, these four artists trace the various ways these symbols work both in public and private space to define features of our cultural life, sense of self, social rankings, and communities.

Body Armor is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1 presents a new series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) created between 2015 and 2017. Depicting magnified details of human skin in high resolution, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Featuring six works, which range in height from twelve to nineteen feet, Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is on view through September 3.

Seth Price: Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance

June 03, 2018–September 09, 2018

Since the 1970s, Sue Coe (British and American, b. 1951) has worked at the juncture of art and activism to expose injustices and abuses of power. Protesting various forms of exploitation and violence, she tackles issues of sexism, racism, economic inequality, xenophobia, and animal cruelty. On view through September 9, Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance highlights these concerns through a selection of drawings, prints, and large-scale collages, as well as illustrations that Coe produced for newspaper opinion pages.

Sue Coe: Graphic Resistance is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, with Josephine Graf, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art

June 09, 2018–October 07, 2018

The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

In partnership with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne will present MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art as part of its Winter Masterpieces series. MoMA at NGV will provide a unique survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s iconic collection. Consisting of approximately 200 key works, arranged chronologically into eight thematic sections, the exhibition will trace the development of art and design from late-19th-century urban and industrial transformation, through to the digital and global present.

The emergence of a “new art” at the turn of the 20th century will be represented by some of MoMA’s earliest acquisitions, including masterworks by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne as well as an architectural model by Le Corbusier featured in MoMA’s first architecture exhibition in 1932. Works by pioneering Cubist and Futurist artists, including Pablo Picasso and Umberto Boccioni, will appear alongside the radically abstracted forms present in graphic design, furniture, and textiles from the Bauhaus and in works by artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian. The surreal visual language of paintings by artists like Salvador Dalí and Frida Kahlo and the spontaneity and tactility advanced in works by prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Alexander Calder and Jackson Pollock will also be included.

Developments in art from the 1960s to the 1980s, from Minimalism through Postmodernism, will be explored through the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Sol LeWitt, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring, among others. Significant works of late 20th-century and early 21st century art and design, including major pieces by Kara Walker, Rineke Dijkstra, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson, Huang Yong Ping, Mona Hatoum, El Anatsui and Camille Henrot, will foreground ideas around cultural and national identity, and mobility in a globalized world. Tomohiro Nishikado’s pioneering computer game Space Invaders and Shigetaka Kurita’s original set of 176 emoji will further complement the discussion of contemporary topics.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria.

Organized by Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Juliet Kinchin, Curator of Modern Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Miranda Wallace, Senior Curator, International Exhibition Projects, NGV.

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If Everything Is Sculpture Why Make Sculpture? Artist’s Choice: Peter Fischli

Ongoing from June 11

This summer, Snowman, a sculpture composed of an actual snowman encased in a glass-door freezer, by Peter Fischli (Swiss, b. 1952) and his longtime collaborator David Weiss (Swiss, 1946–2012), comes to the Museum’s Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden as part of Fischli’s Artist’s Choice presentation. Here, Fischli borrows a question inscribed on a painting presented outdoors by artist Ben Vautier (French, b. 1935): “If everything is sculpture why make sculpture?” Along with Snowman, nearly 20 objects selected by Fischli offer answers to this question.

Initiated in 1989, the Artist’s Choice series invites contemporary artists to organize exhibitions drawn from MoMA’s collection. Fischli is the 13th artist to participate in the series, and the first to do so in the Sculpture Garden.

Snowman (2016) is an updated version of a 1987 site-specific work by Fischli and Weiss that was commissioned by a German thermic power plant whose energy—in the form of heat, paradoxically—was used to keep the snowman perpetually frozen. Though a snowman is, as Fischli observes, a “sculpture that almost anyone can make” simply by rolling three spheres of snow and setting them atop one another, Fischli and Weiss’s Snowman is dependent on a technically complex apparatus for its year-round subsistence. Over the course of three decades of collaboration, Fischli and Weiss shared an interest in exploring inherent contradictions and the extraordinary potential of everyday objects and situations.

Snowman takes on new associations in the setting of MoMA’s Sculpture Garden and in the company of works that span the last century, by artists from Henri Matisse and Aristide Maillol to Tony Smith and Katharina Fritsch. Together, Snowman and its companions testify to the expansive possibilities for sculpture today, and to the role of museums in nurturing and preserving their collections.

Organized by Peter Fischli and Cara Manes, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Artist’s Choice exhibition series is made possible through The Agnes Gund Artist’s Choice Fund endowed by Iara Lee and George Gund III, Lulie and Gordon Gund, Ann and Graham Gund, and Sarah and Geoffrey Gund.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Young Architects Program 2018: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine

June 28, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1

Hide & Seek by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of Arup, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard from June 28 through September 3, 2018. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s construction is a responsive, kinetic environment that features eight intersecting elements arrayed across the entirety of the MoMA PS1 courtyard. Hide & Seek serves as a temporary urban landscape for the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series.

Now in its 19th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues.

Inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city, Hide & Seek enables surprising connections throughout the adjoining courtyards of MoMA PS1 and the surrounding streets. Each of the horizontal structures contains two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors suspended from a frame. The mirrors move in the wind or with human touch, permitting dislocating views and unique spatial relationships across the space that foster unexpected interactions. As the vanishing points disappear into the depths of the mirrors, the illusion of space expands beyond the physical boundaries of the Museum and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside. In reference to these unpredictable gestures, the upper registers of the steel structure are filled with a cloud of mist and light, responding to the activity and life of Warm Up at night. Scriptive elements, including a runway and a large-scale hammock, invite visitors into performance and establish platforms for improvisation.

Warm Up 2018

June 30, 2018–September 01, 2018

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up returns in 2018 with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music. Taking place every Saturday from June 30 through September 1, Warm Up celebrates a wide range of artists: emerging and established, local and global, and across genres. This year’s program welcomes Omar-S, SOB x RBE, HoodCelebrityy, Cashmere Cat, Kelsey Lu, Maxo Kream, Lizzo, A-Trak, Gang Gang Dance, Josey Rebelle, Starchild + The New Romantic, and DJ Kass, as well as the New York debut of Laff Trax, a new collaboration by Chaz Bear of Toro y Moi and Jason Chung of Nosaj Thing, and a final-day headlining set by members of Discwoman, a collective that exclusively represents women and genderqueer artists.

Now in its 21st season, Warm Up is one of the longest running music programs housed within a museum. As an integral part of MoMA PS1’s curatorial program, Warm Up seeks to elevate innovative and underrepresented voices and connect fans with music’s most important artists. The program’s alumni include contemporary creators Four Tet, Solange, Black Dice, Cardi B, Jamie XX, and Laurel Halo, as well as legendary DJs including Ritchie Hawtin, DJ Premier, and Total Freedom.

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Rockaway! 2018: Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama

July 01, 2018–September 03, 2018

Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden

This summer, MoMA PS1 will present Yayoi Kusama’s (Japan, b. 1929) site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden (1966–present) as the third iteration of Rockaway!, a free public art festival presented with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Narcissus Garden will be on view from July 1 through September 3, 2018 at the Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden.

Comprised of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres, Narcissus Garden will be on view in a former train garage from the time when Fort Tilden was an active U.S. military base. The mirrored metal surfaces will reflect the industrial surroundings of the now-abandoned building, drawing attention to Fort Tilden’s history as well as the devastating damage inflicted on many buildings in the area by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Rockaway! 2018 is presented by MoMA PS1 with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980

July 15, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, July 10, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the architecture of the former Yugoslavia with Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, the first major US exhibition to study the remarkable body of work that sparked international interest during the 45 years of the country’s existence. The exhibition will include more than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region, introducing the exceptional built work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience for the first time.

The architecture that emerged during this period—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist “social condensers”—is a manifestation of the radical pluralism, hybridity, and idealism that characterized the Yugoslav state itself. Exploring themes of large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture, Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature work by important architects, including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić. From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition will examine the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character.

Organized by Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and Vladimir Kulić, Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University, with Anna Kats, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Constantin Brancusi Sculpture

July 22, 2018–February 18, 2019

Floor Two, Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Looking back at the first showing of Constantin Brancusi’s work (1876–1957) in the United States, in the 1913 Armory Show, one writer reflected that sculptures on view were “disturbing, so disturbing indeed that they completely altered the attitude of a great many New Yorkers towards a whole branch of art.” Indeed, Brancusi’s beguilingly simple forms looked like nothing else, then or since.

Rather than modeling clay like his peers, Brancusi carved his work directly from wood or stone, or cast it in bronze. Simultaneously, he rejected realism, preferring that his sculptures evoke rather than resemble the subjects named in their titles. Brancusi made bases for many of his sculptures, themselves complex constructions that became part of the work. He often moved works from base to base, or placed them directly on the floor of his studio, so that they lived in the world alongside ordinary objects, and among people.

Born in rural Romania, Brancusi moved to Paris in 1904, where he established his studio and quickly immersed himself in avant-garde art circles. In his adopted city, he embraced an experimental modern spirit, including an interest in modern machines and popular culture. With his friend Man Ray, he made films that captured his life in the studio—working with his materials and muses, activating his artworks through movement and recombination, and revealing his sources of inspiration such as animals at play, light in nature, and dance. Yet until his death he proudly presented himself as an outsider—cultivating his image as a peasant, with a long beard, work shirt, and sandals. The contradiction also informs his art making, which was dependent on ancient techniques as much as contemporary technologies.

This exhibition celebrates MoMA’s extraordinary holdings—11 sculptures by Brancusi will be shown together for the first time, alongside drawings, photographs, and films. A selection of never-before-seen archival materials shed light on the artist’s working process and relationships with friends, sitters, and patrons, including this Museum. What emerges is a rich portrait of an artist whose risk-taking and inventive approach to form changed the course of the art that followed.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture

The exhibition is made possible by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Major support is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by Jack Shear with The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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Modern Matinees: Vincent Price

September 05, 2018–October 31, 2018

Before he became synonymous with the ghoulish and macabre, channeling Edgar Allan Poe and sundry possessed madmen, Vincent Price (American, 1911–1993) graduated from Yale University with an art history degree. While in London to continue his studies, Price was drawn to the stage, and by 1935 he was a member of Orson Welles’s Mercury Theatre. With his distinctive voice—part effete, part diabolical—and imposing 6’4″ frame, Price was truly a rarity compared to the typical Hollywood lead. His earliest film roles consisted of character parts in costume dramas, and it wasn’t until 1940, when he appeared in The House of the Seven Gables, that Price’s predilection for Gothic narratives was revealed.

After a string of high-profile roles in Brigham Young (1940), Laura (1944), and The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), Price became a true lead, and his versatility—cad, romantic, adventurer, villain—was reflected by the diversity of the films he appeared in (all while remaining quite attached to 20th Century Fox). In 1946, in a review of Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s DragonwyckThe New York Times presciently encapsulated Price’s appeal by referring to his performance as an example of “suave diabolism.”

Price cleverly continued to mix up the roles he choose, from a Southwestern land boss in The Baron of Arizona (1950) to Omar Khayyam in Son of Sinbad (1955) to the ringmaster in The Big Circus (1959), but a string of low-budget horror films would come to define his legacy—beginning with 1958’s The Fly and reaching a crescendo in his Poe-inspired collaborations with Roger Corman, including House of Usher(1960), The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), and The Masque of the Red Death (1964). Price’s mischievous raised eyebrows and devilish vocal modulations made him perfect for these roles, and he relished his eccentric performances. Toward the end of his career, Price’s reputation was cemented with a younger generation when he provided the iconic voice-over soliloquy for Michael Jackson’s hit “Thriller,” and later worked with Tim Burton on Edward Scissorhands (1990), his final live-action film appearance.

This wide-ranging look at the career of Vincent Price is drawn mainly from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund, with leadership support from the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, and major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

 
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Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done

September 16, 2018–February 03, 2019

Floor Two, Contemporary Galleries and the Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Wednesday, September 12, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

For a brief period in the early 1960s, a group of choreographers, visual artists, composers, and filmmakers made use of a local church to present performances that Village Voice critic Jill Johnston declared the most exciting new developments in dance in a generation. Redefining the kinds of movement that could count as dance, the Judson participants—Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Philip Corner, Bill Dixon, Judith Dunn, David Gordon, Alex Hay, Deborah Hay, Fred Herko, Robert Morris, Steve Paxton, Rudy Perez, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Rauschenberg, Carolee Schneemann, and Elaine Summers, among others—would go on to profoundly shape all fields of art in the second half of the 20th century. Taking its name from the Judson Memorial Church, a socially engaged Protestant congregation in New York’s Greenwich Village, Judson Dance Theater was organized as a series of open workshops from which its participants developed performances. Together, the artists challenged traditional understandings of choreography, expanding dance in ways that reconsidered its place in the world. They employed new compositional methods to strip dance of its theatrical conventions, incorporating “ordinary” movements—gestures typical of the street or home, for example, rather than a stage—into their work, along with games, simple tasks, and social dances to infuse their pieces with a sense of spontaneity.

Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done highlights the ongoing significance of the history of Judson Dance Theater, beginning with the workshops and classes led by Anna Halprin, Robert Ellis Dunn, and James Waring and exploring the influence of other figures working downtown such as Simone Forti and Andy Warhol, as well as venues for collective action like Judson Gallery and the Living Theatre. Through live performance and some 300 objects including film, photographic documentation, sculptural objects, scores, music, poetry, architectural drawings, and archival material, the exhibition celebrates the group’s multidisciplinary and collaborative ethos as well as the range of its participants. The Work Is Never Done includes a gallery exhibition, a print publication, and an ambitious performance program in the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium.

The exhibition is organized by Ana Janevski, Curator, and Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Leadership support is provided by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions, and by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Major support is provided by Jody and John Arnhold and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Hammer Horror: A Frankenstein Septet

September 18, 2018–October 12, 2018

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818, has inspired hundreds of films; in 1910 Thomas Edison produced the first cinematic version in his Bronx studio, starring Charles Stanton Ogle as the monster. Hollywood audiences fell in love with Frankenstein after the 1931 Universal Pictures version, featuring Boris Karloff’s iconic block-headed, neck-bolted creature and the hysterical doctor’s spectacular laboratory of tesla coils and steam-spewing equipment, all in glorious black and white.

In 1957, the British production company Hammer Films produced the first of its seven Frankenstein films, which focused more on the Gothic aspects of the book and the obsession, ambition, and guilt of the doctor (usually played by Peter Cushing). These films overflow with mournful music, overwrought Victorian décor and costumes, lusty characters, and decidedly more disfigured, wrathful monsters—all amplified by a highly artificial, gruesome color palette that makes even a glimpse of blood into a horrifying experience.

Hammer Horror: A Frankenstein Septet is presented in conjunction with It’s Alive! Frankenstein at 200, a visual history of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, at The Morgan Library and Museum October 12, 2018–January 27, 2019.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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The Unknown Jerry: Home Movies and More from the Jerry Lewis Collection at the Library of Congress

October 02, 2018–October 11, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Although his official debut as a filmmaker wouldn’t occur until The Bellboy in 1960, Jerry Lewis actually began directing movies soon after his arrival in Hollywood in 1949. Working with a group of close industry friends, Lewis wrote, photographed, and directed a series of 16mm films that pushed the definition of “home movies” to its limits, featuring synchronized sound, professional acting, and fully developed storylines. Presented as “Gar-Ron Productions”—the name came from Jerry and Patti Lewis’s two oldest sons, Gary and Ron—these fledgling efforts featured the Lewis’s close friends Janet Leigh and Tony Curtis, Jerry’s screen partner Dean Martin, writers Harry Crane and Danny Arnold (later of Barney Miller fame), and a rotating cast of family members and Pacific Palisades neighbors. Made between 1951 and 1955, these neophyte works reveal an intuitive understanding of framing and cutting that would blossom with Lewis’s great feature films of the 1960s (a sampling of which are included here). Newly preserved by the Library of Congress, these films are being shown here for the first time in their entirety. This series is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Looking at Jerry Lewis: The Nutty Professor Storyboards, on view in The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Rob Stone, Moving Image Curator, The Library of Congress; Chris Lewis, American Wheelchair Mission; and Jamie Lee Curtis.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Looking at Jerry Lewis: The Nutty Professor Storyboards

October 6, 2018–March 3, 2019

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries

Few stars from the golden age of the Hollywood studio system valued looking—and being looked at—more than Jerry Lewis (1926–2017) did. Having amassed years of stage experience before he emerged as a major film actor and director, he made acknowledging his audience an essential aspect of the “comedy of looks” that characterized his work. And in no other Lewis film is the experience of being seen so central as in The Nutty Professor (1963), in which he treats his audience as a main character. In this adaptation of the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde story, his dual performance as the self-effacing Professor Kelp and the narcissistic Buddy Love represents different sides of the Lewis persona, and the onscreen student and nightclub audiences who witness his behavior represent the gaze of the moviegoing public.

A recent gift to the Museum, John Lauris Jensen’s storyboards for The Nutty Professor are graphic interpretations of the script, suggesting elements of performance, staging, lighting effects, camera placement, and cutting continuity. The 11 storyboard sequences on display here anticipate the look and experience of the motion picture, skilfully expressing Lewis’s intentions as both director and performer.

Jensen began his film career as an illustrator at Paramount Pictures in the 1950s, creating scenic art and costume design for producer-director Cecil B. DeMille (The Ten Commandments, 1956; The Buccaneer, 1958). Though he is better known for his work on period action films and Westerns, Jensen’s collaborations with Jerry Lewis, which also included The Bellboy (1960) and The Family Jewels(1965), prove he was equally skilled at visualizing physical and dramatic comedy.

This exhibition compliments the film series The Unknown Jerry: Home Movies and More from the Jerry Lewis Collection at the Library of Congress.

Looking at Jerry Lewis: The Nutty Professor Storyboards is organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers, Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

 
 
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Charles White: A Retrospective

October 07, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 2, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

With Charles White: A Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art and The Art Institute of Chicago present the first major museum exhibition of Charles White’s oeuvre in over 30 years, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 7, 2018, through January 13, 2019. Covering the full breadth of his career with over 100 multidisciplinary works, the exhibition features drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, and contextual ephemera. Prior to its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will be on view at The Art Institute of Chicago from June 8 through September 3, 2018. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019.

Beginning in the late 1930s and concluding with White’s premature death in 1979, the exhibition features a detailed overview of his work over a four-decade span of enormous change in the US that provided a constant wellspring of subject matter for the artist. The presentation reveals White as a responsive visual strategist who was open to exploring styles and techniques inspired by contemporary art and culture, and a savvy interpreter of an evolving political climate. White’s commitment to figuration, to directly addressing the social and political concerns of his time, and to mastering mediums that allowed for wide circulation of his art established him as a major figure, and one with significant influence on his peers and followers.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section will be supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

Charles White: A Retrospective is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Sarah Kelly Oehler, Field-McCormick Chair and Curator of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago.

The exhibition is supported at The Museum of Modern Art and at The Art Institute of Chicago by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., and by The Dian Woodner Exhibition Endowment Fund.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
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Karpo Godina

October 19, 2018–October 25, 2018

An essential figure of Yugoslav cinema, Karpo Godina infused the radical “Black Wave” of the 1960s with an irrepressible expressive freedom—squarely targeted against all forms of repression—and thrived long after the end of Titoism and the breakup of Yugoslavia in civil war. For more than 30 years, the half-Slovenian, half-Macedonian filmmaker has brought a playfully anarchical spirit to the poetics and politics of film, moving breathlessly between fiction and nonfiction in his avant-garde shorts of the 1960s and ’70s and his feature films of the 1980s and ’90s.

Godina was a frequent collaborator of Bahrudin “Bato” Čengić, Želimir Žilnik, Lordan Zafranović, and other pioneering members of the Black Wave, and he has since worked comfortably in the former Yugoslavian republics as a director, screenwriter, cinematographer, and editor.

Karpo Godina makes a rare appearance at MoMA to present his first career retrospective in the US, coinciding with the exhibition Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980.

Organized by Jurij Meden, Curator, Austrian Filmmuseum; Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Ana Janevski, Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts

October 21, 2018–February 18, 2019

The Museum of Modern Art, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor, and MoMA PS1

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The exhibition is on view at The Museum of Modern Art October 21, 2018–February 18, 2019, and at MoMA PS1 October 21, 2018–February 25, 2019.

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 present the first comprehensive retrospective in 25 years devoted to the work of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941), on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 21, 2018, through February 18, 2019, and at MoMA PS1 from October 21, 2018, through February 25, 2019. Co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel, Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts draws upon the rich holdings of both institutions and nearly 70 lenders. Encompassing Nauman’s full career and featuring a total of 165 works, the exhibition occupies the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the whole of MoMA PS1. This joint presentation will provide an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture to neon, performance, film and video, and architecturally scaled environments.

Since 1970, Nauman has frequently worked on a monumental scale, necessitating this expansive presentation across both of MoMA’s locations. Both venues include works in all mediums and from all phases of Nauman’s career, offering distinct but complementary perspectives on his wide-ranging practice. The characteristics of the two spaces have shaped the curatorial approach to each. The flexibility of The Museum of Modern Art’s sixth-floor galleries are uniquely suited to some of the artist’s largest works, and the 50 works in this portion of the exhibition move swiftly from Nauman’s early sculptures derived from his own body to room-size installations that directly involve the viewer. The suite of former classrooms in MoMA PS1’s historic building houses 115 works, organized thematically to chart the recurrence of key concepts across the decades. The presentation highlights the underlying consistencies in a seemingly disparate body of work, as the artist revisits his earlier motifs and concerns with new urgency.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel.

The exhibition is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Laurenz Foundation Curator and Advisor to the Director, The Museum of Modern Art; with Heidi Naef, Chief Curator, and Isabel Friedli, Curator, Schaulager Basel; and Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager Basel.

Leadership support is provided by The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Generous funding is provided by The Hayden Family Foundation, Sully Bonnelly and Robert R. Littman, Ellen and William Taubman, and by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by LLWW Foundation.

Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund and by The Museum of Modern Art’s Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

 

 

 

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Catalan Cinema’s Radical Years, 1968–1978

October 25, 2018–November 10, 2018

This series traces 10 revolutionary years in the history of Catalan cinema: the period between 1968 and 1978, when the fate of Spain—and Catalonia’s place in it—lay in the balance. The death of General Francisco Franco on November 20, 1975, and the ascension of Juan Carlos I to the throne made possible the nation’s transition from brutal dictatorship to fragile democracy. The Catalan language, after nearly a half-century of censorship, could once again be expressed freely in the streets and in the arts.

Filmmakers who during the last years of dictatorship had risked their lives by shooting clandestinely or by encoding their scripts with politically subversive ideas responded to a newfound freedom after 1976 with work that continues to excite and provoke. The exhibition, drawn entirely from the archives of the Filmoteca de Catalunya, spans the decade from the radicalism of 1968 to the first democratic elections in 1977 and the writing of the Constitution of Spain the following year. It includes films by Pere Portabella, Antoni Ribas, and others that explore the legacy of the Spanish Civil War, the surge of immigrants into Barcelona and other cities in Catalonia from other parts of Spain, Catalan national identity, the clash of dissident movements, feminist and class struggle, and sexual liberation.

Program descriptions are written by Esteve Riambau. All films courtesy of the Filmoteca de Catalunya.

Organized by Esteve Riambau, Director, Filmoteca de Catalunya, and Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Projects 195: Park McArthur

October 27, 2018–January 27, 2019

Park McArthur makes work that often responds to the institutional and architectural context of exhibition spaces. Projects 195: Park McArthur takes shape against the background of the Museum’s ongoing west-end expansion, which is scheduled for completion in 2019 and will add gallery space in an adjacent, newly developed tower with 145 private luxury apartments above the Museum.

McArthur worked with a fabricator to produce a modular, stainless steel structure which will be rearranged several times over the course of the exhibition. It doubles as an exploratory proposal for a mixed-use building with artist studios, a public gallery, and below-market apartments for disabled and non-disabled people who mutually receive and provide care. Also comprising works on paper, and visual descriptions available on MoMA Audio, Projects 195 focuses on the social realities behind the architectural facts of scale and site.

While this presentation is number 109 in the Projects series, the artist changed this count to 195, as MoMA held 86 Projects exhibitions before introducing the numbering system. A work in its own right, this alteration draws attention to the Museum’s standardized institutional language, which McArthur has compared to “a frame through which the exhibition arrives”—it contains the work and shapes how we view it.

Organized by Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, with Tara Keny, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art, New York

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Modern Matinees: Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.

November 01, 2018–December 28, 2018

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (1909–2000), scion of swashbuckling silent-era megastar Douglas Fairbanks, was destined to become a movie star, but he had to get there on his own terms. Fairbanks, Jr. was born in New York City and made his first credited film appearance in 1923 in Joseph Henaberry’s Stephen Steps Out, now considered a lost film. An attempt to exploit his famous last name and connect the unsophisticated teenager with his father’s valiant screen image, it wasn’t a success. His early projects at Paramount were underwhelming as well, and the studio soon dropped him. Realizing he needed to forge his own path in Hollywood, Fairbanks got to work and accepted whatever roles came his way.

His dedication, not to mention elegant good looks and aristocratic comportment, Fairbanks eventually opened doors at at First National and Warner Bros., in films such as The Dawn Patrol (1930) and Little Caesar (1931). As the Great Depression caught hold in the United States, even the film studios were inclined to institute austerity policies; in 1934 Warner Bros. asked their stars to take a 50% pay cut. Fairbanks refused and, a lifelong Anglophile, decamped to Great Britain, where he found work. Returning to Hollywood in 1937, he costarred in hits like The Prisoner of ZendaThe Young in Heart (1938), and the iconic Gunga Din(1939).

During WWII, Fairbanks enlisted as a reserve officer in the United States Navy, and soon became interested in the then-unfamiliar wartime practice of “military deception”—deceiving the enemy by dissembling critical maneuvers. These tactics, undertaken by a force called the Beach Jumpers, were especially useful in amphibious battles in the South of France. Fairbanks was eventually awarded the Navy’s Legion of Merit award and became a Lieutenant Commander.

After returning from duty, Fairbanks remained active in film and television through 1989; his final feature film appearance was in Ghost Story (1981). This sweeping view of his career is drawn mainly from MoMA’s collection.

A full screening schedule can be found here.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Marie Losier: Just A Million Dreams

November 01, 2018–November 11, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art presents a mid-career retrospective celebrating French artist and experimental filmmaker Marie Losier, from November 1 through 11, 2018. Marie Losier: Just a Million Dreams highlights two dozen short films and two feature length films made over the last 15 years, seen together for the first time. Losier’s anticipated second feature, Cassandro the Exotico!—a portrait of the titular gender-bending lucha libre icon—premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival in the ACID section, and opens the MoMA series in its American premiere. Best known for poetic 16mm film portraits of avant-garde musicians and filmmakers that transcend documentary conventions, Losier is dedicated to analog 16mm filmmaking in a digital age, shooting, editing, and often producing films entirely herself. The series also celebrates the recent addition of 19 of Losier’s films to the Museum’s collection, as part of MoMA’s ongoing commitment to contemporary moving-image work. 

A longtime New York resident, Losier arrived in 1994 to study painting and quickly fell into the orbit of luminaries who would later appear in her pictures: she designed props for Richard Foreman and learned to shoot 16mm with Mike Kuchar at the Millennium Film Workshop (all the while beginning to curate screenings around town). For Losier, these intergenerational connections go hand in hand with a boundless urge to create art with others through films that channel the unfettered spirit of artistic creation. Replete with physical comedy reminiscent of silent cinema and campy fantasy in the tradition of Jack Smith, Losier’s cinema is, above all, rooted in performance. Losier’s highly personal body of work, ranging from intimate portraits to rollicking performance films with costumes and sets created by the artist, music videos, and genre-inflected narratives, is unified by her intuitive attention to rhythm and handmade compositions.

Marie Losier: Just A Million Dreams is organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

The exhibition is supported in part by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Scorsese in New York

November 02, 2018–November 10, 2018

On the occasion of The Museum of Modern Art’s 11th Annual Film Benefit, which honors Martin Scorsese, we are proud to present 11 of Scorsese’s films, all set in his hometown of New York City.

A pair of New York institutions, Scorsese and MoMA have had a long and fruitful relationship; the Museum’s collection includes 20 of the director’s films, and his commitment to film preservation and stewardship of The Film Foundation has formed the basis of four MoMA exhibitions since the mid-1990s, including Scorsese Collects and, most recently, a twopart series featuring new restorations from Republic Pictures.

As Rajendra Roy, MoMA’s Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, put it, “From his unextinguishable drive to innovate as a filmmaker to his passion for film history and his personal advocacy for film literacy, Martin Scorsese is cinema’s greatest hero. He is a universe unto himself, and all of us who are privileged to work in his orbit are nurtured by his considerable force. He is a loyal and dear part of The Museum of Modern Art family, and we are happy to welcome him home once again.”

Organized by the Department of Film.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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The Contenders 2018

November 08, 2018–January 08, 2019

The Museum of Modern Art announces its selection of the boldest films of 2018 for the 11th year of The Contenders, running November 8, 2018, through January 8, 2019. MoMA’s annual end-of-year series offers audiences the unique opportunity to peer behind the industry curtain, with special presentations that often feature revealing post-screening conversations with filmmakers and actors. Tickets for the MoMA screenings go on sale two weeks prior to each screening at 9:30 a.m. at The Museum of Modern Art and online at moma.org/contenders.

Opening the series at the Museum on November 8 is Steve McQueen’s Widows (2018), a blistering, modern-day thriller set against a backdrop of crime, passion, and corruption. Widows  is the story of four women with nothing in common except a debt left behind by their dead husbands’ criminal activities. Oscar winner Viola Davis leads a knockout ensemble of women who take their fate into their own hands and conspire to forge a future on their own terms. Director Steve McQueen and Producer Iain Canning will be present for a post-screening discussion on opening night.

A full screening schedule can be found here.

Organized by the Department of Film.

Media Sponsorship is provided by The Hollywood Reporter.

The presentation is supported by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Silent Comedy International

November 23, 2018–December 02, 2018

Film historians tend to treat early European film comedy and the American style of slapstick as two independent traditions, but in fact there was a great deal of bilateral trade being conducted during the silent era. The prolonged chases and bizarre visual gags of turn-of-the-century French comedies directly influenced American producers like Mack Sennett, while Hollywood’s genius for creating vivid star personalities found its reflection in Europe’s feature-length comedies of the 1920s. Certain comedy creators and performers, like Max Linder, Marcel Perez, and Leonce Perret, were busy cross-pollinators, working on both continents and using the best of both traditions.

Another important factor was the onslaught of British comics in American films following the huge success of Charlie Chaplin. Producers, eager to hop on the Chaplin gravy train, sought out performers with similar English stage backgrounds, and created the original “British Invasion” of American popular culture. The expressive pantomime and knockabout gags of the English music hall tradition quickly took root in Hollywood slapstick and, thanks to trans-fertilization, soon ended up in French, Italian, and German films.

By tracing the circulation of comic styles, this series suggests that the European and American silent comedies share a common ancestry and a common aim: laughter without borders.

A full screening schedule can be found here.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, and Brittany Shaw, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and independent curators Steve Massa and Ben Model.

The organizers wish to thank Robert Arkus, Association Chaplin, BFI, Eileen Bowser, Serge Bromberg, Rob Byrne, CNC, Rachel Del Gaudio, EYE Filmmuseum, The Library of Congress, Lobster Films, Mike Mashon, Elif Rongen-Kaynakci, San Francisco Silent Film Festival, Lynanne Schweighhofer, the late Charles Silver, Rob Stone, and Undercrank Productions.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Ugo Tognazzi: Tragedies of a Ridiculous Man

December 05, 2018–December 30, 2018

The great Italian actor, director, and screenwriter Ugo Tognazzi (1922–1990) was among the inimitable quintet of actors from Italian cinema’s golden age—Tognazzi, Marcello Mastroianni, Vittorio Gassman, Alberto Sordi, and Nino Manfredi—who invented and popularized commedia dell’Italia, that tragicomic admixture of folly and melancholy, and commanded the lion’s share of Italy’s box-office receipts in the 1960s and ’70s. Tognazzi’s career began opposite Raimondo Vianello in satirical sketch comedies of fledgling 1950s Italian television—his gifts of impersonation and improvisation are hilariously on display in films like Dino Risi’s I mostri (1963) and Luigi Zampa’s A Question of Honor (1965)—and deepened as his roles in later years became more acidic and introspective. If a typical Tognazzi character was virile and dissolute, sweet-talking his way into beds, executive offices, and corridors of power, he was also confronted with the sinking awareness of his own mortality. One witnesses in this retrospective, then, a man’s seemingly inexorable passage from brash ambition to bitter regret, a man seeking to preserve his dignity in the face of diminishing prowess.

In collaboration with Luce Cinecittà, Rome, MoMA celebrates Tognazzi with a retrospective that spans his four-decade career. The series features 25 of his nearly 150 films, including his unforgettable, award-winning performances in Luciano Salce’s The Fascist (1961), Carlo Lizzani’s La Vita agra (1964), Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Porcile(1969), Marco Ferreri’s La Grande Bouffe (1973), Elio Petri’s Property Is No Longer a Theft (1973), Mario Monicelli’s Amici miei (1975), Édouard Molinaro’s La Cage aux folles(1978) and Bernardo Bertolucci’s Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man (1981).

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, and Camilla Cormanni and Paola Ruggiero, Luce Cinecittà.

Support for the exhibition is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership support for the Annual Film Fund is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation and Steven Tisch, with major contributions from Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Karen and Gary Winnick, and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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The Value of Good Design

February 10, 2019–May 27, 2019

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Featuring objects from domestic furnishings and appliances to ceramics, glass, electronics, transport design, sporting goods, toys, and graphics, The Value of Good Design explores the democratizing potential of design, beginning with MoMA’s Good Design initiatives from the late 1930s through the 1950s, which championed well-designed, affordable contemporary products. The concept of Good Design also took hold well beyond the Museum, with governments on both sides of the Cold War divide embracing it as a vital tool of social and economic reconstruction and technological advancement in the years following World War II. This global scope is reflected in many of the items on view, from a mass-market Italian Fiat Cinquecento automobile and a Soviet-era East German Werra camera to a Japanese Sony television and a Brazilian bowl chair. These works join both iconic and unexpected items made in the US, such as the Eames La Chaise, a Chemex Coffee Maker, and Irwin Gershen’s Shrimp Cleaner.

The exhibition also raises questions about what Good Design might mean today, and whether values from mid-century can be translated and redefined for a 21st-century audience. Visitors are invited to judge for themselves by trying out a few “good design” classics still in production, and exploring how, through its design stores, MoMA continues to incubate new products and ideas in an international marketplace.

Organized by Juliet Kinchin, Curator, and Andrew Gardner, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

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Joan Miró: Birth of the World

February 24, 2019–July 06, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Joan Miró: Birth of the World, an exhibition that explores the development of Miró’s pictorial universe, with particular emphasis on his intense engagement with poetry, the creative process, material experimentation, and the seen and unseen world. This focused exhibition, drawn from MoMA’s unrivalled Miró collection and augmented by several key loans, situates his monumental painting, The Birth of the World (1925), in relation to other key works by the artist, which are rarely shown together. On view from February 24 through July 6, 2019, the exhibition includes approximately 60 paintings, works on paper, prints, illustrated books, collages, and objects primarily made between 1920, the year of Miró’s first catalytic trip to Paris, and the early 1950s, when his unique visual language gained international acclaim.

The Museum of Modern Art’s collection of Miró’s works constitutes one of the finest and most comprehensive in the world. In 1941, MoMA organized the first major museum retrospective of Miró’s work, followed by others in 1959 and 1993, the centennial of the artist’s birth. The Museum has also presented focused exhibitions, most recently Joan Miró: Painting and Anti-Painting 1927–1937 (2008), which explored a single, transformative decade in Miró’s long career. The present exhibition extends the Museum’s commitment to Miró by offering for examination and reassessment an in-depth presentation of his works from the collection.

The exhibition is organized by Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Senior Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century

March 17, 2019–June 23, 2019

The Museum of Modern Art announces New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century, on view from March 17 through June 23, 2019. Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition includes works made since the turn of the millennium that push the boundaries of technology: upending systems, twisting materials, and inventing novel techniques and forms. The exhibition explores the ways in which technological processes are still stubbornly tied to the physical world—mired in matter, friction, and breakdown. 

With a number of recent acquisitions and large-scale installations never before shown at the Museum, the exhibition showcases a diverse range of techniques and media, from live digital simulation to 3-D printing, magnetic resonance imaging, industrial vacuum-formed plastic, and ultrasound gel. Among the featured artists in the exhibition are Josephine Pryde (born 1967, United Kingdom), Anicka Yi (born 1971, South Korea), Seth Price (born 1973, East Jerusalem), and Basim Magdy (born 1977, Egypt). Their art revels in the weird and unexpected, giving rise to hybrid constellations of things, bodies, and data.

New Order: Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century is organized by Michelle Kuo, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

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Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern

March 17, 2019–June 30, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art announces Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern, an exhibition exploring Lincoln Kirstein’s sweeping contributions to American cultural life in the 1930s and ’40s, on view from March 17 through June 30, 2019. Best known for co-founding the New York City Ballet, Kirstein (1907–1996), a polymathic writer, curator, editor, impresario, tastemaker, and patron, was also a key figure in MoMA’s early history. With his prescient belief in the role of dance within the museum, his championing of figuration in the face of prevailing abstraction, and his position at the center of a New York network of queer artists, intimates, and collaborators, the impact of this extraordinary individual remains profoundly resonant today. Seen through the lens of Kirstein, the works in the exhibition reveal an alternative and expansive view of modern art.

Kirstein proclaimed, “I have a live eye,” and the exhibition illuminates the influence of his vision, tastes, and efforts on the Museum’s collecting, exhibition, and publication history. Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern features more than 200 works from the Museum’s collection—set and costume designs for the ballet by Paul Cadmus and Jared French, photographs by Walker Evans and George Platt Lynes, realist and magic realist paintings by Honoré Sharrer and Pavel Tchelitchew, sculpture by Elie Nadelman and Gaston Lachaise, and the Latin American art that Kirstein acquired for the Museum by artists such as Antonio Berni and Raquel Forner—alongside material drawn from the Museum Archives.

Organized by Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator, and Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

 

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Simone Fattal

March 31, 2019–September 02, 2019

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition in the United States of the work of Simone Fattal (Lebanese and American, b.1942). The retrospective will bring together a selection of over 100 works created over the last 40 years, featuring abstract and figurative ceramic sculptures, paintings, and collages that draw from a range of sources including war narratives, landscape painting, ancient history, mythology, and Sufi poetry. The exhibition will explore the impact of displacement, as well as the politics of archeology and excavation, as these themes resonate across Fattal’s multifaceted artistic practice.

Simone Fattal is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1.

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Gina Beavers

March 31, 2019–September 02, 2019

MoMA PS1 presents the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Gina Beavers (American, b. 1974). In her visceral, vexing, often grotesque paintings, Beavers transforms images sourced from the internet into painted reliefs composed from thick layers of acrylic medium. Born from the online world yet stubbornly physical, Beavers’s paintings condense the ether of digital images into bodily objects that convey both sensuality and abjection. Confronting questions of consumption, desire, and self-fashioning, she gravitates toward a repertoire of recurring subjects that reflect everyday life in the age of social media, such as “food porn,” bodybuilder selfies, and makeup tutorials. Rendered with an unsettling degree of realism, Beavers’s work is always more than merely representational. Whether depicting a painter’s palette or the fluorescent green of a bulbous tennis ball, her high-relief paintings protrude obscenely into the space of the viewer, insisting on their status as tactile things. In her more recent work, the artist both parodies and venerates iconic figures from the history of art, from Van Gogh to Mondrian, pointing to a deep engagement both with painting’s legacies and its continued relevance as a critical lens on contemporary culture.

Gina Beavers is organized by Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

Major support is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Tom Slaughter Exhibition Fund. Additional funding is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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