Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA and MoMA PS1

Disappearing Acts: Bruce Nauman, 1964-2018

October 2018 – January 2019

The Museum of Modern Art, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor, and MoMA PS1

The Museum of Modern Art and Schaulager, Basel, announce their collaboration on a full retrospective devoted to the work of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941). Opening at Schaulager in March 2018 and traveling to The Museum of Modern Art in October of that year, the exhibition will be the first comprehensive retrospective of the artist’s work across all mediums in over 20 years, and will build upon the rich holdings of the two organizing institutions. Covering his entire career, from the earliest fully realized sculptures of 1965 to his most recent work, the exhibition will provide an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and neon, to performance, video, film, sculpture, and large-scale installations—including Days (2009), a 14-channel sound installation for which Nauman won the Golden Lion for Best National Participation at the Venice Biennial in 2009.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

The exhibition is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director and Laurenz Foundation Curator, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with Heidi Naef, Senior Curator, Schaulager, Basel, and Isabel Friedli, Curator, Schaulager, Basel, Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
The exhibition is made possible by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.
 
Lead Corporate Sponsor of the New York presentation is Hyundai Card.
 
Generous funding is provided by Sully Bonnelly and Robert R. Littman and by Ellen and William Taubman.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

 

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Modern Mondays

Ongoing

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

Building upon the Museum’s eight-decade tradition of fostering cinematic innovation and experimentation, Modern Mondays invites artists working in the expanded field of film, video, performance, and sound to present their work in an intimate setting. A platform for both emerging artists and pioneering figures who have changed the way we think about the moving image, this series premieres new projects and rediscovers landmark works. Considering avant-garde narratives from the 21st century, the program also celebrates legacies of influential historical figures in a contemporary context. Each evening presents a unique opportunity for audiences to engage in dialogue with artists, along with curators and other guests.

An Evening with Kamau Amu Patton
Monday, September 18, 7:00 p.m.

Kamau Amu Patton is an interdisciplinary artist whose work engages with archives, documents, stories, and sites. On March 2, 2013, under the auspices of the Lone Wolf Recital Corps, along with Terry Adkins (1953-2014) and Blanche Bruce, Patton performed Amun (The Unseen Legends), described in the event’s announcement as “an immersive improvisational experience in sound and light” in which the artists “explore passages through mercurial windows of appearance and invisibility.” The recital featured a projection of Patton’s 2010 abstract film Theory of Colors, as well as improvisational sound. On the occasion of Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps Kamau Amu Patton re-stages Amun (The Unseen Legends), performing live electroacoustic improvisation to Theory of Colors accompanied by a digitally scrubbed recording of the 2013 recital in which only Adkins’s musical parts remain.
 
The program will commence with a screening of documentation of Patton’s 2008 performance Proliferation of Concept/Accident Tolerant, a precursor to Theory of Colors. The screening and performance will be followed by a conversation between the artist and Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.Organized by the Department of Film and the Department of Media and Performance Art.
 

An Evening with Shikeith Cathey and Rickey Laurentiis
Monday, October 167:00 p.m.

 In conjunction with the film series Black Intimacy, artist Shikeith Cathey presents his experimental documentary #blackmendream (2014), followed by The Black Boy and the Tree (2016) and the premiere of his newest short film, A Drop of Sun Under the Earth (2017). Cathey will be joined by poet Rickey Laurentiis for a discussion of vulnerability and notions of black masculinity, and alternative means of defining and speaking about the self.

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MoMA PS1 Building Images

Ongoing

Images of MoMA PS1’s building are located through Press Access.

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The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries, Fifth Floor

Ongoing

Fifth floor

The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries feature on the fifth floor roughly span the years 1880 to 1940. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Post-Impressionism, Cubism, the work of Henri Matisse, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, and Surrealism, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. 

Browse selected works on view.

 

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Touring and Off-Site Exhibitions

Ongoing

BRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
February 21–May 22, 2017

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (KNW), Düsseldorf, Germany
March 4–June 11, 2017

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from the Museum of Modern Art
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virgina
March 10–June 18, 2017

Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire
September 30–April 9, 2017

Robert Rauschenberg
Tate Modern, London, England
November 30, 2016–April 9, 2017

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
November 4, 2017–March 25, 2018

Masterworks from MoMA
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
June 8–October 7, 2018

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Young Architects Program International

Ongoing

With its international partnerships, Young Architects Program (YAP) offers selected young designers and architects across the globe the opportunity to create designs that promote diverse uses such as rest, play, and relaxation as well as hosting a series of live events such as shows, music, dance, exhibitions, and performances. In addition architects are encouraged to address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling, to create highly innovative projects that provide shade, seating, and water. To achieve these goals, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are currently partnering with the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI) in Rome, CONSTRUCTO in Chile, and Istanbul Modern in Turkey (on a biennial cycle).

In May 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul announced a new partnership that further expands the international YAP to South Korea. YAP Korea provides opportunities for emerging architects in South Korea to create temporary exterior installations for summer programming at the MMCA.

A dedicated YAP International website, MoMA.org/yap, features the selected proposals and designs from the winner of YAP International. The website also includes an archive of past MoMA/MoMA PS1 YAP finalists and winning proposals, interviews with the curators, and installation videos.

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Projects 105: Cinthia Marcelle

October 23, 2016–September 04, 2017

Duplex Gallery and Cinema, MoMA PS1

Projects 105 presents Education by Stone (2016), a new site-specific installation by Cinthia Marcelle (Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1974) and the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York. Recently selected to represent Brazil at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Marcelle is known for her installations, performances, and videos, which stage forms of labor to produce poetic situations. Occupying MoMA PS1’s Duplex gallery, the installation will insert chalk, a pedagogical material to which she has re-turned throughout her career, in the building’s formerly scholastic space. Numerous rods of chalk will be lodged into the fissures and openings of the gallery’s brick walls from floor to ceiling, revealing the material’s inherent instability and fragility.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Cinthia Marcelle has had solo exhibitions in South America and Europe. She recently participated in the 11th Sharjah Biennial (2015), and will represent Brazil in the 57th Venice Biennale (2017). In 2006, she was the recipient of the International Prize for Performance for her work Gray Demonstration (2006). In 2010, she was awarded the Future Generation Prize.

Organized by Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by The Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection

March 19, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 14, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Unfinished Conversations brings together works by more than a dozen artists, made in the past decade and recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art. The artists that make up this intergenerational selection address current anxiety and unrest around the world and offer critical reflections on the present moment.

The exhibition considers the intertwining themes of social protest, the effect of history on the formation of identity, and how art juxtaposes fact and fiction. From Cairo to St. Petersburg, from The Hague to Recife, the artists in the exhibition observe and interpret acts of state violence and the resistance and activism they provoke. They reexamine historical moments, evoking images of the past and claiming their places within it. They take on contemporary struggles for power, intervening into debates about government surveillance and labor exploitation. Together, these artists look back to traditions both within and beyond the visual arts to imagine possibilities for an uncertain future.

The title of the exhibition is inspired by John Akomfrah’s three-channel video installation The Unfinished Conversation (2012), which chronicles the life and work of the Jamaican-born British cultural theorist Stuart Hall (1932–2014). Hall recognized the power that museum collections have to both shape and reflect culture and communities, contending that they are sources of inspiration “which create thought-provoking visions of our past. They provide testimony to the darkest and brightest of human history.”

Unfinished Conversations includes works by John Akomfrah, Jonathas de Andrade, Anna Boghiguian, Andrea Bowers, Paul Chan, Simon Denny, Samuel Fosso, Iman Issa, Erik van Lieshout, Cameron Rowland, Wolfgang Tillmans, Adrián Villar Rojas, Kara Walker, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art and Director MoMA PS1; Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, with Elizabeth Henderson, Department Coordinator, Office of the Chief Curator at Large. 

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Additional support for Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Maureen Gallace

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

The first survey of paintings by American artist Maureen Gallace, Clear Day features nearly 70 works spanning the artist’s career. For more than 25 years, Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has painted genre scenes drawn from the American landscape and still life traditions. Her small canvases and panels most commonly depict rural pastorals and coastlines, typically featuring nondescript barns or cottages amid dunes and foliage that evoke a nostalgic New England. Recalling holiday cards and vacation snapshots, Gallace’s paintings quietly disturb the reassuring sentimentality of such pictures. Often lacking doors or windows, her houses may seem locked up, or disquietingly open and vulnerable to the elements. Her lush gardens and yards can be obstructed by fences, and paths lead the viewer astray; infinite vistas over the ocean are stacked and collapsed into shallow compositions. From the outset of her career, Gallace has deployed a range of abstract compositional tools to frustrate the romantic enticements of her subject matter and the painterly seductions of her surfaces, giving rise to a quietly remarkable and contemporary body of work.

Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at Maureen Paley, London (2016); 303 Gallery, New York (2015); La Conservera, Murcia, Spain (2011); The Art Institute of Chicago (2006); Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2004); Dallas Museum of Art (2003); and Museum Schloss-Hardenberg, Velbert, Germany (1996). Group shows in which she has participated include September 11, MoMA PS1 (2011) and the Whitney Biennial (2010).

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Ian Cheng: EMISSARIES

April 9–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. museum solo exhibition for Ian Cheng, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015–17), a series of live simulation works created using a video game engine. Described by the artist as “a video game that plays itself,” the works are comprised of computer-generated simulations like those used in predictive technologies for complex scenarios such as climate change or elections. Populated by a cast of characters and wildlife that interact, intervene, and recombine in open-ended narratives, Cheng’s simulations evolve endlessly as self-contained ecosystems. The exhibition EMISSARIES marks the completion of this series of works, which contemplate timeless questions about evolution, the origins of human consciousness, and ways of relating to a chaotic existence. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is on display for the first time at MoMA PS1.

EMISSARIES is presented as a large-scale installation that transforms the gallery into a portal-like environment for Cheng’s simulations to build, generate, regress, and progress.  The 10-foot-tall projections allow each simulation to unfold at life-size, positioning viewers as observers who can follow the lives of specific characters as they interact within the simulated worlds and each other in an ever-changing environment.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms, an exhibition featuring the work of the Slovakian artist and documentary filmmaker. Since 2009, Rafa (b. Žilina, 1979) has employed the methods of cinéma verité to document what he refers to as “new nationalisms” across Central Europe, creating vivid and stirring portraits of the resurgence of extreme right-wing, xenophobic, and neo-fascist groups in the region.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; and Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Past Skin

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

In today’s technological environment, we can style, extend, and broadcast ourselves at will, projecting into digital realms that in turn shape us. The six artists in Past Skin take up science historian and cyber-feminist Donna Haraway’s provocation, “Why should our body end at the skin?,” testing the growing porosity between our bodies and habitats in a contemporary world where virtuality is ubiquitous and surreality is increasingly normalized. As much as we exert influence on our bodies and surroundings, the technologies that enable this influence also influence us. No longer simply “users” of technology, we become players renegotiating the stakes of our world, engineering natural and synthetic environments to fulfill social imperatives and emotional needs. Featuring 20 works across a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, drawing, sound, video, and virtual reality—by artists Cui Jie, Jordan Kasey, Hannah Levy, Abigail Lucien, Jillian Mayer, MSHR, and Madelon Vriesendorp, Past Skin highlights works that merge figures with landscapes to examine the state of the contemporary body in and beyond nature.

Past Skin is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

 

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A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976–2000

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976-2000, a selection of archival materials documenting the vast array of artists who worked and exhibited in the museum’s building over the course of its first 25 years. Surveying a period that spans from the institution’s inaugural 1976 exhibition Rooms to its merger with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000, the exhibition brings together hundreds of objects drawn from the MoMA PS1 Archives, including artist’s proposals, exhibition posters, photographs, correspondence, flyers, postcards, residency applications, and other ephemera.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1; and Jonathan Lill, Leon Levy Foundation Project Manager, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15, 2017–August 13, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, April 11, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Remarks will be livestreamed at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning but still relatively under-recognized achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features nearly 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by more than 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse. The exhibition will also feature many little-known treasures such as collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and recent acquisitions on view for the first time at MoMA by Ruth Asawa, Carol Rama, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

 

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW

April 30, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, and The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW is the first major survey in New York of the artist Louise Lawler (American, b. 1947), spanning the 40-year creative output of one of the most influential artists working in the fields of image production and institutional critique. The exhibition takes its title from one of Lawler’s most iconic works, Why Pictures Now (1982), a black-and-white photograph showing a matchbook propped up in an ashtray. Reminiscent of an advertising photograph or a film noir still, it asks the viewer to consider why the work takes the form of a picture, and why the artist is making pictures now. Lawler came of age as part of the Pictures Generation, a loosely knit, highly independent group of artists named for an influential exhibition, Pictures, organized in 1977 by art historian Douglas Crimp at Artists Space in New York. These artists used photography and appropriation-driven strategies to examine the functions and codes of representation. Lawler’s signature style was established in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when she began taking pictures of other artists’ works displayed in collectors’ homes, museums, storage spaces, and auction houses to question the value, meaning, and use of art. WHY PICTURES NOW is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, with Kelly Sidley, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Generous funding is provided by the Walton Family Foundation, David Dechman and Michel Mercure, Fotene Demoulas and Tom Coté, Tracy and Gary Mezzatesta, Susan and Arthur Fleischer, Patrice and Louis Friedman, Mark Diker, and by Ann and Mel Schaffer. 

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Inbox: Steve McQueen

May 06, 2017–August 27, 2017

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

The Museum of Modern Art will display Static (2009), a recently acquired digital projection of a 35mm film by the artist and filmmaker Steve McQueen (British, born 1969), in The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium from May 6 through summer 2017. The installation is part of MoMA’s ongoing Inbox series, which highlights new acquisitions to the Museum’s collection. Shot from a helicopter circling the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island, in New York Harbor, the film captures Lady Liberty both in furtive, detailed close-ups and from a greater remove. As suggested by the work’s title, the statue remains fixed, intended to be gazed at from afar, even as the many perspectives from which it is encountered are subject to change. Accompanied by the roaring sound of the helicopter blades, the piece is marked by unease and uncertainty, showcasing and scrutinizing one of the most iconic symbols of the US within the urban surroundings of New York City and New Jersey. This is the first time Static will be shown on the scale of a major civic space. The film was made in 2009 to coincide with President Barack Obama’s motion to reopen the Statue of Liberty to the public on July 4th as a special gift to the US after the monument’s eight-year closure following the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Inbox is an ongoing series of installations that began in 2014 to showcase new additions to MoMA’s collection. The Museum’s first brochure in 1929 outlined its “ultimate purpose” as “to acquire, from time to time, (either by gift of by purchase) a collection of the best modern works of art.” This process remains central to the Museum’s mission and, as such, MoMA acquires a diverse selection of modern and contemporary artworks every year. Previous Inbox installations have included: Inbox: Jasper Johns, Inbox: The Original Emoji, by Shigetaka Kurita, Inbox: August Sander, Inbox: Channa Horwitz, Inbox: Glenn Ligon, and Inbox: Haegue Yang, Spice Moons.

Organized by the Department of Media and Performance Art.

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Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends

May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. View a video of the remarks.

In 1959, Robert Rauschenberg wrote, “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. (I try to act in that gap between the two.)” His work in this gap shaped artistic practice for decades to come.

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Acclaimed artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas is collaborating on the exhibition’s design to foreground Rauschenberg’s work with dance and performance. MoMA’s presentation is structured as an “open monograph”—as other artists came into Rauschenberg’s creative life, they come into the exhibition, mapping the exchange of ideas. These figures include Trisha Brown, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Sari Dienes, Jasper Johns, Billy Klüver, Paul Taylor, David Tudor, Cy Twombly, Susan Weil, and many others.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition design was created in collaboration with the artist Charles Atlas.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Robert Rauschenberg.

The exhibition is supported at Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by Glenn and Eva Dubin, The Dana Foundation, Donald B. Marron, the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund, Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, Mrs. Ronnie F. Heyman, Helen and Charles Schwab, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III in honor of Jerry I. Speyer, and by Tiffany & Co.

Generous funding is provided by west elm.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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Projects 106: Martine Syms

May 27, 2017–July 16, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

Projects 106: Martine Syms, the first US solo museum exhibition by Martine Syms (b. 1988, Los Angeles), is an immersive installation including photographs and staged objects, and centering around a new feature-length film, Incense Sweaters & Ice.

Shot on location in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, Incense Sweaters & Ice follows three protagonists—Mrs. Queen Esther Bernetta White, Girl, and WB (“whiteboy”)—as they navigate dramas of surveillance, moving between watching, being watched, and remaining unseen. Accompanying the film is a suite of photographs sized to standard American movie posters and a metal mesh structure inspired by the geographies of the Great Migration.

Using video and performance, Syms examines representations of blackness and its relationship to narrative, vernacular, feminist thought, and radical traditions. Her artwork has been exhibited and screened extensively, including presentations at the Berlin Biennale, Manifesta 11, ICA London, The Hammer Museum, the New Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Initiated by MoMA in 1971 as a platform for new and experimental art, the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series, now presented at both The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1, provides a forum for the most urgent international voices in contemporary art. Projects 106: Martine Syms will be accompanied by an illustrated brochure. On the occasion of her exhibition, Syms will premiere a new lecture-performance as part of MoMA’s educational programming.

Projects 106: Martine Syms is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to Brent Freaney at Special—Offer.

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Inbox: Charles Atlas: The Illusion of Democracy

June 03, 2017–August 13, 2017

Exhibition Galleries, Second Floor

Throughout his forty-year career, the groundbreaking filmmaker and video artist Charles Atlas (American, born 1949) has collaborated with key figures from a range of creative disciplines, expanding the relationships between visual art, dance, music, theater, and television. In the late 1970s, together with the choreographer Merce Cunningham, Atlas pioneered “media-dance,” in which dance works were created and performed specifically for the camera. Atlas’s experimental narrative works from the 1980s integrate fiction and documentary with vibrant, stylized portraits of urban subcultures.

With his trilogy The Illusion of Democracy (2008–12), Atlas has abandoned the presence of human bodies in favor of numerical figures, animating a constantly expanding and contracting universe based on six digits. Casting 1 through 6 as the protagonists of these intricately choreographed video installations, Atlas pushes the limits of their “numberness” and evokes the pervasiveness of mathematical algorithms in our increasingly technologized society. In Plato’s Alley (2008), pulsing vertical and horizontal white lines take shape as a grid populated by the ensemble, and in Painting by Numbers (2011), a sea of digits swells and subsides over six acts that culminate in a climactic finale. In 143652 (2012), bars of color slowly yet relentlessly scan back and forth, at once erasing and transforming each figure. With its methodical abstraction and politically suggestive title, the trilogy is an introspective study in order and chaos.    

Charles Atlas has collaborated on the design of the exhibition Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, currently on view in the fourth-floor Collection Galleries.

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Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, June 8, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow in theater. Watch video of the remarks.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise nearly 400 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, and photographs, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Young Architects Program 2017: Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio

June 29, 2017–September 04, 2017

MoMA PS1

Lumen, an immersive, interactive installation by Jenny Sabin Studio, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard beginning June 29. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s structure evolves over the course of the day, with responsive textiles that display subtle color in sunlight and emit glowing light after sundown. Lumen serves as the setting for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series, incorporating a custom lighting program to complement these vibrant, popular events. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Made of over 1,000,000 yards of digitally knitted and robotically woven fiber, Lumen features two large-scale cellular canopies with 250 hanging tubular structures that create opportunities for visitors to interact with the work. The design incorporates 100 robotically woven recycled spool stools and a misting system that responds to visitors’ proximity to produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s adaptive architecture is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure transforms throughout the day and night, responding to the density of bodies, heat, and sunlight. The result of collaboration across disciplines, Lumen applies insights and theories from biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering—integrating high-performing, formfitting, and adaptive materials into a structure where code, pattern, human interaction, environment, geometry, and matter operate together.

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Landmark 20th Season of Warm Up Begins July 1

July 01, 2017–September 02, 2017

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up celebrates its 20th season in 2017, with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music—both local and global—across a range of genres. Warm Up 2017 begins on Saturday, July 1 and runs through Saturday, September 2, featuring a to-be-announced lineup of emerging and established artists as part of an ambitious and wide-ranging program.

Advance tickets are now available for all Warm Up 2017 dates. In celebration of Warm Up’s founding year, MoMA PS1 will offer a special “1998” ticket package providing access to all ten dates for only $98, available for a limited time only. Full ticketing information can be found within the full press release, in the press kit section of this page, or at mo.ma/warmup .

Over its 20 seasons, Warm Up has featured more than 750 artists, including pop artists Solange, Jamie XX, and Grimes, experimental musicians Arca, Black Dice, and Four Tet, and legendary DJs like DJ Premier, Ritchie Hawtin, and Derrick May. One of the longest-running music programs within a museum, Warm Up has a history of supporting seminal artists before they come to prominence and providing a platform for experimentation, unique collaborations, and new material. 

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Modern Matinees: The Impeccable Deborah Kerr

July 05, 2017–August 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

As the proper Victorian school teacher Anna Leonowens in The King and I (1956) Scottish-born actress Deborah Kerr (1921–2007) polka’ed in a satin ball gown in the Siam heat, maintaining a resplendent, unruffled persona that remained fresh while her dancing partner, the king, looked positively frittered. Known for her cool nature, elegant visage, and a preference for female characters with great intelligence, Kerr always seemed naturally at ease on screen.

Kerr first turned heads in Major Barbara (1941) as Jenny Hill, a young woman as dedicated to the mission of the Salvation Army as the titular Major, before going on to work with iconic British directors Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger in The Life and Times of Colonel Blimp (1943) and Black Narcissus (1947). The 1950s brought Kerr her most celebrated roles, as the jaded military wife Karen Holmes in From Here to Eternity (1953) and the proper Anna in The King and I. From Here to Eternity also hinted at Kerr’s versatility; a 1953 Variety review noted the role’s unanticipated sexuality: “Miss Kerr’s role and delivery of it is a far cry from the sweet, pure things she previously portrayed and may bring about a casting switch for her.”

This series, mainly drawn from MoMA’s collection, offers a glimpse into a career that included multiple Academy Award nominations, BAFTA distinctions, and a special Oscar for her extraordinary work as a leading lady.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Stanya Kahn: Stand in the Stream

July 08, 2017–September 04, 2017

MoMA PS1

In Stand in the Stream, Stanya Kahn weaves together deeply personal and emphatically political imagery into a meditation on intimacy, alienation, and resistance. Both a work of mourning and a call to action, the film is also a documentary portrait of four generations of Kahn’s family: her grandmother, her mother, her son, and herself. MoMA PS1’s exhibition is the New York premiere and first museum presentation of this work.

Built from footage Kahn shot primarily over the past six years, Stand in the Stream records the artist in the act of both living and seeing, culminating in her activist mother’s decline into dementia and eventual death in 2015, and in events leading up to and surrounding the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. In a rhythmic flow of images, punctuated by irruptions of protest, solidarity, and violence, Kahn’s film charts the intersection between private and public life in today’s America.

The film’s title refers both to the stream of digital images and to Bertolt Brecht’s play, Man Equals Man, which deals with the ways in which human beings are instrumentalized in the manner of machines. As Kahn connects to random strangers in internet chatrooms while wearing Halloween monster masks, or voyeuristically records anonymous riders on the subway, she plays with distinctions between the intimacy of family and the estrangement of contemporary life.

The film’s sound design includes original compositions by Kahn and by musician/composer Alexia Riner. All footage is shot live or livestream screen-recorded in real time.

This presentation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction

July 17, 2017–August 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction, presented at The Museum of Modern Art from July 17 through August 31, will screen 70 science-fiction films from all over the world—22 countries including the United States, the Soviet Union, China, India, Cameroon, Mexico and beyond—that explore the question: What does it mean to be human? In a departure from other exhibitions of science-fiction cinema, Future Imperfect moves beyond space travel, visions of the distant future, alien invasions and monsters. Instead, all 70 films take place on Earth in the present (or near present), questioning our humanity in all its miraculous, uncanny, and perhaps unknowable aspects.

Since the dawn of cinema, filmmakers as diverse as Kathryn Bigelow, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Kinji Fukasaku, Jean-Luc Godard, Barry Jenkins, Georges Méliès, Michael Snow, Alexander Sokurov, and Steven Spielberg have explored ideas of memory and consciousness; thought, sensation, and desire; self and other; nature and nurture; time and space; and love and death. Their films, lying at the nexus of art, philosophy and science, occupy a twilight zone bounded only by the imagination, where “humanness” remains an enchanting enigma.

Future Imperfect is organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), consists of an evolving cast of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these events were part of “an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” Recitals, which Adkins orchestrated with the Corps through collective improvisation, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as abolitionist John Brown, musician John Coltrane, explorer Matthew Henson, and singer Bessie Smith.

Projects 107 is the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. In addition to a selection of Adkins’s sculptures, performance props and paraphernalia, and documentary videos of recitals, Projects 107 features a series of live performances by the Corps. The performance program brings together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians in the Lone Wolf Recital Corps: Sanford Biggers, Juini Booth, Blanche Bruce, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Dick Griffin, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Cavassa Nickens, Demetrius Oliver, Clifford Owens, Kamau Amu Patton, Marshall Sealy, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, and Kiane Zawadi; and others, including Da’Niro Elle Brown, Zachary Fabri, LaMont Hamilton, Jason Moran, and Kambui Olujimi.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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3-D Funhouse: Recent Restorations from the 3-D Film Archive

September 01, 2017–September 07, 2017

3-D Funhouse is a weeklong tribute to the enterprising 3-D Film Archive, whose curators have dedicated themselves to collecting, restoring, and presenting in digital form the stereoscopic films of the analog era. It takes a lot of dedication and detective work to reassemble these wonders of midcentury technology, many of which were discarded by their producers once the 1950s 3-D fad had passed. Presented here are four newly restored features, ranging from the studio musical Those Redheads from Seattle (1953) to the feisty independent science-fiction film Gog (1954), as well as a program of rare 3-D shorts.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

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Modern Matinees: Directed by John Cassavetes

September 01, 2017–October 27, 2017

The name John Cassavetes is usually at the top of any list of American independent filmmakers. He raised his own production funds and wrote, directed, and often starred in the features he made, alongside a stalwart group of loyal actors. Steadfastly working outside the Hollywood studio system, Cassavetes (1929–1989) endeavored to bring truly authentic narratives to the screen, regularly focusing on stories about marriage, male friendship, family dynamics, and reconciliation. The subject matter was raw, deeply affecting audiences who saw much of their own lives reflected onscreen.

Cassavetes began his career as an actor in the nascent days of television. By the time he began work on his first feature film, Shadows, in 1959, he had already helmed episodes of Alfred Hitchcock PresentsThe Philco-Goodyear Playhouse, and Playhouse 90. This immersion in television production as both a director and actor provided both the money needed to finance his own films and valuable experience working nimbly with a small budget, limited equipment, and a like-minded cast. According to Shadows producer Seymour Cassel, the film was shot so economically that the 16mm camera equipment was borrowed from fellow New York filmmaker Shirley Clarke. While some of Shadows was improvisational, much was fully scripted by the time the film was shot—including scenes filmed right here in The Museum of Modern Art.

Though each film was an uphill battle, Cassavetes persevered while remaining truly independent. His outsider films were commended by critics, embraced by audiences, and even managed to garner major industry awards. Cassavetes was nominated for two Oscars—for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay—and received awards from the Venice Film Festival and the National Society of Film Critics.

John Cassavetes Directs includes 10 feature films and a short, all drawn from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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MoMA Presents: Deepak Rauniyar’s White Sun

September 06, 2017–September 12, 2017

The second feature by Nepalese filmmaker Deepak Rauniyar sensitively explores the damage done to the fabric of Nepalese society by the decade-long civil war between the Maoists and Nepal’s monarchical government. On the occasion of his father’s funeral, Chandra returns to the village he left years earlier to join the Maoists, and finds himself united with the daughter he never met and revisiting uneasy relations with family members and neighbors. Past traumas return and cause tensions to boil over. Finding the political within the everyday, White Sun uses one village’s complex tribulations to speak to an entire national history.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Seto Surya (White Sun). 2016. Nepal/USA/Qatar/Netherlands. Directed by Deepak Rauniyar. In Nepali; English subtitles. 89 min.

Wednesday, September 6, 7:30 p.m., T2
Thursday, September 7, 4:30 p.m., T1
Friday, September 8, 7:30 p.m., T2
Saturday, September 9, 4:30 p.m., T2
Sunday, September 10, 1:30 p.m., T2
Monday, September 11, 7:30 p.m., T2
Tuesday, September 12, 4:30 p.m., T2

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Kelly Reichardt: Powerfully Observant

September 12, 2017–September 25, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Kelly Reichardt is a true American auteur; you know her films when you see them. Her camera focuses on a landscape and remains, still and patient, until the most minor action occurs—and then she holds for a moment more, an audaciously minimalist style that challenges the audience to focus on light, shadow, or the merest sound. Reichardt’s films have always been preoccupied with the ordinary, tricky messes characters cook up in their daily lives, and her characters are conflicted, exhausted, inhabiting unremarkable worlds laden with broken promises. But when they do break out, like the miserable Florida housewife in River of Grass—beware!

From the unconventional buddy movie Old Joy, to the parched, harrowing wagon train journey of Meek’s Cutoff, to the trio of small-town stories in last year’s Certain Women, Reichardt plumbs human memory, survival, self-reliance, and loneliness. Another unconventional buddy movie, Wendy and Lucy, reflects the economic downturn of 2008 through a taciturn, pragmatic woman who packs up her car and her dog to find work in Alaska.

This mid-career retrospective includes the six feature films Reichardt has made since 1994—a seemingly modest filmography for more than 20 years of work. But these intricately produced and fiercely independent are well worth the wait. As Catherine Wheatley wrote of the characters in Certain Women, “They know to keep their counsel, these women: know the importance of restraint, silence, of knowing when to speak and when to act and when to stay still.” These same qualities characterize the graceful, intensely perceptive films of Kelly Reichardt.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film. Thanks to Dan Berger of Oscilloscope Films and Brittany Shaw.

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MoMA Presents: Mahamat- Saleh Haroun’s Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy

September 21, 2017–September 27, 2017

On September 21, Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, the writer-director of such award-winning fiction films as AbounaDaratt, and A Screaming Man, returns to MoMA to introduce a weeklong run of his first feature-length documentary, Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy (2016). Presented at the Cannes, Toronto, and New York film festivals, Haroun’s film observes the aftermath of war crimes committed by the brutal dictator Hissein Habré during his eight-year reign (1982–90); his three-year trial for the murder of 40,000 Chadians; and attempts at truth and reconciliation between members of Habré’s police force and the survivors of torture in prison or the families of those who were murdered. Two weeks after the premiere of Haroun’s film at Cannes, Hissein Habré was found guilty by a court in Senegal—the first-ever living African leader to be brought before a court of law, and the first to be convicted for crimes against his own people and against humanity. The power of Haroun’s film lies in its unadorned approach to this harrowing period of Chad’s history, using the quietly damning voices of the victims themselves to make its case. This weeklong run is presented in collaboration with UniFrance.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film.

Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy. 2016. France/Chad. Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun. In French and Arabic; English subtitles. 82 min.

Thursday, September 21, 6:45 p.m., T2. Introduced by Mahamt Saleh Haroun. 
Friday, September 22, 6:30 p.m., T3
Saturday, September 23,  1:30 p.m., T2
Sunday, September 24, 5:30 p.m., T3
Monday, September 25, 4:30 p.m., T2
Tuesday, September 26, 4:00 p.m., T2
Wednesday, September 27, 7:00 p.m., T2

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Max Ernst: Beyond Painting

September 23, 2017–January 01, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany. 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went “beyond painting” to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II. Featuring approximately 100 works drawn from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition includes paintings that challenged material and compositional conventions; collages and overpaintings utilizing found printed reproductions; frottages (rubbings); illustrated books and collage novels; sculptures of painted stone and bronze; and prints made using a range of techniques. Several major, multipart projects represent key moments in Ernst’s long career, ranging from early Dada and Surrealist portfolios of the late 1910s and 1920s to his late masterpiece—a recent acquisition to MoMA’s collection—65 Maximiliana, ou l’exercice illégale de l’astronomie (1964). This illustrated book comprises 34 aquatints complemented by imaginative typographic designs and a secret hieroglyphic script of the artist’s own invention.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Talia Kwartler, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

 

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Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Tuesday, September 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,200 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Marron Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 300 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available in process at moma.org/bourgeoisprints, now documenting over 4,000 printed sheets.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Kenneth C. Griffin Charitable Fund and by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to The Easton Foundation for its long-standing support of the Louise Bourgeois print archive at The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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MoMA Presents: Jang Woo-jin’s Autumn, Autumn

September 29, 2017–October 05, 2017

With a surprising structure that recalls the work of both Hong Sang-soo and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, this delicate sophomore feature by Jang Woo-jin is a tale of human connection and searching for one’s place in the world. It begins simply enough, with a young man sitting next to an older couple on a train from Seoul to the city of Chuncheon. From there, we follow the man as he copes with the anxiety of trying to find a job, and then the couple, who, as it turns out, don’t know each other as well as it seems. With funny and moving scenes that play out in understated yet bravura long takes, Autumn, Autumn is as attuned to the passage of time and fluctuations of light as it is to everyday human drama.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Chuncheon, chuncheon (Autumn, Autumn). 2017. South Korea. Directed by Jang Woo-jin. In Korean; English subtitles. 78 min.

Friday, September 29, 7:00 p.m., T2
Saturday, September 30, 4:00 p.m., T2

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Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor

The Museum of Modern Art presents Items: Is Fashion Modern?, an investigation of 111 garments and accessories that have had a profound effect on the world over the last century, on view October 1, 2017, through January 28, 2018. Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition explores fashion thematically, displaying 111 powerful and enduring manifestations of the ways in which fashion—a crucial field of design—touches everyone, everywhere. Like other forms of design, fashion exists within a complex system that involves politics and economics as much as it involves style, technology, and culture. The exhibition examines this complex system using each item as a lens. The 111 typologies are presented in the incarnation that made them significant in the last 100 years (the “stereotype”) alongside contextual materials—images or videos—that trace each item’s history and origins through to its archetypal form. Several concept items (the Little Black Dress, for instance) are represented by more than one example in order to fully underscore the breadth of the concept’s impact, bringing the actual total number of objects in the exhibition to around 350. About 30 items will be complemented by a new prototype—a commissioned or loaned piece inspired by advancements in technology, social dynamics, aesthetics, or political awareness.

The title of the exhibition reprises the question that architect and curator Bernard Rudofsky raised with his 1944 MoMA exhibition Are Clothes Modern?, which is the only other instance of MoMA fully addressing this field of design. In his exhibition, Rudofsky explored individual and collective relationships with mid-century clothing in the waning moments of WWII, when traditional attitudes still prevailed, women still poured their bodies into uncompromising silhouettes, and menswear still demanded superfluous pockets, buttons, cuffs, and collars. For the Items exhibition, Rudofsky’s question provides a springboard (and a foil) from which to consider the ways in which fashion is designed, manufactured, marketed, distributed, worn, and disposed of today.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at medium.com/items. The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at mo.ma/items. It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.
 
Major support is provided by WGSN.
 
Sincere thanks to the members of Friends of Items, a special patron group generously supporting the Museum in celebration of the exhibition.
 
Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
 
MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
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Black Intimacy

October 03, 2017–October 16, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Black Intimacy explores the ways in which black familial, romantic, and platonic relationships have been portrayed onscreen, with a particular focus on black filmmakers’ attempts at navigating between intimate, personal stories and more broadly political material. Given the legacy of American racial politics, can black love be portrayed onscreen without “making a statement” about race, or is it impossible for the personal to be separated from the political?

Comprising 16 films, two shorts, and a television episode, the series highlights the various ways in which love and relationships are colored by the political, across a wide spectrum of perspectives. Several of the films—Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep, for instance—deal with a particular kind of black male figure and pay close attention to black male identity and struggle; films like Claudine, A Warm December, and The Inkwell portray very different types of black romances and family structures to illustrate a broader scope of love and relationships; the notion of how black women are treated as love interests and how their needs are explored and honored is at the heart of Loosing Ground; and black queer identity, intimacy, and vulnerability are front and center in Looking for Langston and The Watermelon Woman.

Organized by Adeze Wilford, Joint Fellow, Department of Film, MoMA, and The Studio Museum in Harlem.

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Charles White—Leonardo da Vinci. Curated by David Hammons

October 07, 2017–January 01, 2018

Charles White (1918–1979) taught drawing in Los Angeles from the mid-1960s until the end of his life, and mentored a generation of students. Among them is David Hammons (American, born 1943), who studied with White early in his career. This exhibition, curated by Hammons, includes White’s monumental work Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)(1973), from The Museum of Modern Art’s collection, and a brush and ink drawing on blue prepared paper by the Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci, lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from the British Royal Collection. Created over 450 years apart, the two works share surprising formal connections and reveal a devotion to drawing by both artists, linking their lasting influence on future generations. Appearing a year prior to the forthcoming MoMA exhibition Charles White: A Retrospective, this project begins the Museum’s consideration of White’s work and his legacy.

Charles White–Leonardo da Vinci. Curated by David Hammons is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is made possible through The Agnes Gund Artist’s Choice Fund endowed by Iara Lee and George Gund III, Lulie and Gordon Gund, Ann and Graham Gund, and Sarah and Geoffrey Gund, generous loan to the Museum by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from the British Royal Collection.

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MoMA and the Fondation Louis Vuitton Announce the Co-Organized Exhibition Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris

October 11, 2017–March 05, 2018

Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, France

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Fondation Louis Vuitton announce the first comprehensive exhibition in France to present MoMA’s unparalleled collection: Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris, on view at Fondation Louis Vuitton from October 11, 2017, through March 5, 2018.

An integrated, cross-disciplinary selection of 200 works, drawn from all six of the Museum’s curatorial departments and reflecting the history of the institution and its collecting, will fill the entirety of the Fondation’s Frank Gehry–designed building. Curated jointly by the two institutions, the display brings together paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, films, media works, performances, and architecture and design objects, tracing the evolution and multifaceted scope of MoMA’s collection. The exhibition was conceived in relation to the architecture and interior spaces of the Fondation Louis Vuitton building, allowing a compelling historical narrative across its four floors.

Etre moderne features masterworks by artists including Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Paul Cézanne, Marcel Duchamp, Walker Evans, Jasper Johns, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Gustav Klimt, Yayoi Kusama, René Magritte, Pablo Picasso, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Yvonne Rainer, Frank Stella, and Paul Signac. A selection of rarely shown documentary material from MoMA’s Archives will be incorporated in the galleries, tracing the history of the Museum and contextualizing the works.

Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris is co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Fondation Louis Vuitton, under the direction of Glenn Lowry (Director, The Museum of Modern Art) and Suzanne Pagé (Artistic Director, Fondation Louis Vuitton). The exhibition is curated by Quentin Bajac (The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, MoMA), assisted by Katerina Stathopoulou (Assistant Curator, MoMA), with Olivier Michelon (Curator, Fondation Louis Vuitton). The archival section is organized by Michelle Elligott (Chief of Archives, MoMA).

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MoMA Presents: Davy Chou’s Diamond Island

October 12, 2017–October 18, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

In this stylish coming-of-age story, an 18-year-old from the Cambodian provinces arrives at Diamond Island luxury housing development outside Phnom Penh to work a construction job transporting scrap between building sites. He makes friends and courts a local girl, but things grow ever more complicated when his long-estranged brother resurfaces. Making his feature-length fiction debut, Davy Chou (whose documentary Golden Slumbers explored the vanished past of Cambodian cinema) creates an intoxicating blend of naturalism and dreamy stylization, rendering the ecstasies and agonies of late youth with remarkable attention to detail.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Diamond Island. 2016. Cambodia/France/Germany/Qatar/Thailand. Directed by Davy Chou. DCP. In Khmer; English subtitles. 101 min.

Thursday, October 12, 7:30 p.m., Theater 1
Friday, October 13, 7:00 p.m. Theater 1
Saturday, October 14, 7:00 p.m., Theater 1
Sunday, October 15, 4:30 p.m., Theater 1
Monday, October 16, 6:30 p.m., Theater 1
Tuesday, October 17, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
Wednesday, October 18, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

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Strange Illusions: Poverty Row Classics Preserved by UCLA

October 19, 2017–October 28, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Long before the Sundance Film Festival, independent productions flourished on Hollywood’s Poverty Row, that strip of Gower Street between Sunset Boulevard and the Paramount lot. Dozens of fly-by-night outfits came and went in the 1930s and ’40s, churning out genre films that often had an edge and grittiness not found in major studio movies. UCLA Film & Television Archive has made it a mission to preserve and restore these rare and endangered works, of which this series presents 12 shining examples, with an emphasis on noir, horror, and pre-Code audacity.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Jan-Christopher Horak, Todd Weiner, and Scott MacQueen of UCLA Film & Television Archive.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first comprehensive retrospective of the work of Carolee Schneemann (American, b. 1939) in the United States, bringing together over 300 works spanning her prolific six-decade career. As one of the most groundbreaking artists of the second half of the twentieth century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into the social construction of the female body and the sexual and cultural biases implicit in traditional art historical narratives have had an indelible impact on subsequent generations of artists.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings from the 1950s, charting their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s—which integrated found objects, mechanical elements, and painterly interventions. A central protagonist of New York City’s downtown avant-garde community, Schneemann explored hybrid art forms that culminated in experimental theater events. She was a co-founder of the innovative Judson Dance Theater and the first visual artist to choreograph for the ensemble. During this period, Schneemann began to position her own body in her work with the intent of performing the roles of “both image-maker and image.” Responding to representations of sexuality made predominantly from the perspective of male artists, Schneemann’s provocative pieces foregrounded her body in ways that challenged prevailing attitudes about female sexuality. In parallel, Schneemann’s outrage over the atrocities of the Vietnam War are starkly reflected in several of her works from the mid-1960s.

The exhibition grounds Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of her lifelong commitment to painting and action, tracing the early developments that would lead to her iconic performances and films from the 1960s and 1970s, through to her multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s exploring feminist iconography, intimacy, and personal loss, as well as political disasters, captivity, and the destruction of war.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting is organized by the Museum der Moderne Salzburg. The exhibition is curated by Sabine Breitwieser, Director, Museum der Moderne Salzburg; and consulting curator Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipolli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, New York; and organized at MoMA PS1 by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Major support is provided by Lonti Ebers.

Generous funding is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Cathy Wilkes

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first monographic exhibition of Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. On view from October 22, 2017 through March 11, 2018, the exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016.

Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures, and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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You Are Now One of Us: Film at Club 57

October 29, 2017–February 28, 2018

In conjunction with the Club 57 gallery exhibition, this series explores the films that took a central role in defining the club’s programming. Selected from actual Club 57 screening schedules, it spans horror, science fiction, musicals, psychedelia, 1960s mod, European art cinema, TV programs, artist’s cinema, and more. At the club, this unruly mix of genres took on new meaning through collective experience and active spectatorship against the backdrop of post-punk New York.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with John “Lypsinka” Epperson, guest curator.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

 
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Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

October 31, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 31, with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the public’s imagination around the world. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition examining the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of downtown New York’s seminal alternative space in full. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Club 57 is accompanied by three film series: You Are Now One Of Us: Film at Club 57, co-organized with guest curator and defining Club 57 artist John “Lypsinka” Epperson (October 29, 2017–February 2018); New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive (December 1, 2017–April 2018), and This Is Now: Film and Video After Punk 1978–1985, presented in spring 2018 in partnership with LUX and British Film Institute.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.

 

 

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Modern Matinees: The Coen Brothers

November 01, 2017–December 29, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Joel and Ethan Coen’s unexpected, often parodic twists on cinematic genres and historical events feature outrageous characters with offbeat regional accents and dubious work ethics. Which is ironic because the Coen brothers have worn many hats on set since their 1984 debut Blood Simple, which, like most of their subsequent films, was directed by Joel, produced by Ethan, and cowritten by the pair.

While their earlier films were twisted, injury-prone, identity-muddled capers in which characters are frequently mistaken for one another (see Raising Arizona, The Hudsucker Proxy,Fargo, and the ubiquitous The Big Lebowski), many later films, like The Man Who Wasn’t There, No Country for Old Men, and A Serious Man, have eschewed perverse comic ingredients in favor of melancholy character studies and examinations of human cruelty. This nimble dexterity across a range of genres has earned them legions of fans and plenty of award-season recognition, from Cannes to the Academy. All 35mm prints are drawn from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Julianne Moore: A Tribute

November 02, 2017–November 12, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Department of Film is thrilled to celebrate honoree Julianne Moore at MoMA’s 10th annual Film Benefit. Since her 1993 breakthrough in Robert Altman’s Short Cuts, Moore has made a career of portraying complex and often unraveling women, turning even her most ordinary scenes into transfixing character studies. At home in both Hollywood blockbusters and art house hits, her vulnerability on screen is singular.

Presented in conjunction with the Film Benefit, this small selection of films—including two from MoMA’s collection (The Kids Are All Right and Far from Heaven) along with masterworks like Safe and Magnolia—captures an actor in top form, exploring remarkable emotional depths.

Organized by Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film.

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From the Collection: Artists at Mid to Late Career

November 11, 2017–November 04, 2018

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

This presentation in the Museum’s fourth-floor collection galleries will focus exclusively on works made by artists in their mid to late careers. Spanning from the late 1960s to today, the installation chronicles the many years of sustained experimentation, daring invention, and thoughtful reconsideration that distinguish an individual artist’s career long after his or her breakthrough moment. Highlighting lesser-known works by prominent artists and key works by some less familiar names, Artists at Mid to Late Career provides another view of the history of art over the last half century. All works are drawn from MoMA’s collection, and includes examples by Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Maria Lassnig, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Wednesday, November 15, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

This is the first U.S. survey to encompass Stephen Shore’s entire career in photography, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms. This major exhibition tracks the artist from his wunderkind beginnings—works made when he was just 14 years old were acquired by Edward Steichen, the Director of the Department of Photography at MoMA, and he had a solo exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art when he was 23 years old—through his continual, restless interrogation of image making. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works, along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Shore (American, b. 1947) has worked with many formats and mediums of photography, and this gathering of hundreds of his works will allow for a fuller understanding of the diversity of his output. The exhibition will feature historic and recent prints of black-and-white and color photographs, books, periodicals, films, portfolios, and digital works, including many that have never been published or exhibited, from his Conceptual projects, the American Surfaces and Uncommon Places series, his landscapes of the 1980s, commissions, and his recent explorations of Israel and Ukraine.

Shore’s first survey in New York in 10 years, this exhibition will both establish the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argue for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator, with​ ​Kristen Gaylord,​ ​Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 
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New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive

December 01, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented as part of the Club 57 exhibition, this survey celebrates film and video created during New York’s post-punk period, including landmark examples of No Wave, Cinema of Transgression, and independent films that grew out of the East Village scene and were first exhibited in area venues like Club 57, New Cinema, Millennium, and others. The richly diverse artists working during the heyday of the downtown scene left a vibrant legacy of Super8 filmmaking; collaborative works that have resonance as neighborhood home movies; and cinema that engages auteurist and genre cinema traditions, or upends them completely. Many of the filmmakers will be present, and we will premiere a number of recent MoMA preservations of little-seen and iconic titles alike.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

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Michelangelo Antonioni

December 07, 2017–January 07, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

It would be hard to overstate Michelangelo Antonioni’s influence on postwar cinema, architecture and design, fashion, literature, and philosophy, even on modern conceptions of the intellectual and the erotic. Antonioni (1912–2007), whose fascination with mediated reality only deepened over time, was a restless experimenter with composition, camera movement, cutting, and storytelling.

Presented with Luce Cinecittà, Rome, and featuring nearly 40 35mm prints and digital preservations, this first complete retrospective in New York in more than a decade celebrates the writer-director’s legendary collaborations with Monica Vitti—the trilogy of L’Avventura, L’Eclisse, and La Notte, which Pauline Kael myopically dismissed in her infamous essay “The Come-Dressed-As-the-Sick-Soul-of-Europe Parties”—as well as Red Desert, Blow-Up, and The Passenger. It also foregrounds Antonioni’s sociopolitical concerns through his neorealist documentary shorts and through his impressionistic yet incendiary Chung Kuo, Cina(1972), which lifted the Iron Curtain on China during the Cultural Revolution. Comparing the “antique and silent” beauty of Ferrara, his childhood town, with his “hard and hostile” experience of Rome, Antonioni might well have been describing the tensions within his own films: abstract, elliptical narratives involving men and women who are estranged from each other, from nature, and from themselves, and who drift through landscapes reflective of their existential despair and yearning.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, and Camilla Cormanni and Paola Ruggiero, Luce Cinecittà.

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Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil

February 11, 2018–June 03, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure for the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features over 130 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila―as she is affectionately known in Brazil―studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her “military service in Cubism,” ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette. The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Brazil, through Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, charting her involvement with an increasingly international artistic community, and her role in the emergence of modernism in Brazil; in 1928, Tarsila painted Abaporu, which quickly spawned the Anthropophagous Manifesto, and became the banner for this transformative artistic movement that sought to digest external influences and produce an art for and of Brazil itself.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. 

Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, former Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Stephanie D’Alessandro, former Gary C. and Frances Comer Curator of International Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago; with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund. 
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Being: New Photography 2018

March 18, 2018–August 19, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Being: New Photography 2018, the latest edition of MoMA’s longstanding and celebrated New Photography series, investigates charged and layered notions of personhood and subjectivity in recent photography and photo-based art, presenting works by 17 artists working in the US and internationally.

The works included in Being respond to diverse lived experiences and circumstances through a range of issues and tactics, including interrogations of traditional modes of photographic portraiture, the use of surrogates or masks as replacements for the body, tensions between privacy and exposure, formations of community or social relations, and the agency of the sitter and of the artist. Some works in the exhibition might be considered straightforward figurative depictions, while others do not include imagery of the human body at all. Since its earliest manifestations, photography has been widely seen as a means by which to capture an exact likeness of a person; the artists featured in Being mine or upset this rich history as they explore photographic representations of personhood today, when rights of representation are contested for many individuals.

Being: New Photography 2018 is constituted primarily of works made since 2016, both by artists who are just starting out in their careers, some showing in New York for the first time, and by others with more established practices who, in some cases, have been supporting the field of photography through teaching or creating other platforms for production. For all the artists, this will be the first exhibition of their work at the Museum.

The artists included are:

Sofia Borges (Brazilian, born 1984)
Matthew Connors (American, born 1976)
Sam Contis (American, born 1982)
Shilpa Gupta (Indian, born 1976)
Adelita Husni-Bey (Italian, born 1985)
Yazan Khalili (Palestinian, born Syria, 1981)
Harold Mendez (American, born 1977)
Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopian, born 1974)
Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương (American, born Hong Kong, 1979; American, born 1976)
B. Ingrid Olson (American, born 1987)
Joanna Piotrowska (Polish, born 1985)
Em Rooney (American, born 1983)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya (American, born 1982)
Andrzej Steinbach (German, born Poland, 1983)
Stephanie Syjuco (American, born Philippines, 1974)
Carmen Winant (American, born 1983)

Being: New Photography 2018 is organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 280 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, the exhibition, which will be seen in its entirety only at The Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor—the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The retrospective will provide an in-depth review of the full range of Piper’s work in diverse mediums: works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sound, and photo/text-based graphics spanning over five decades. Accompanying the exhibition will be a catalogue including essays by Christophe Cherix, Connie Butler, David Platzker, Okwui Enwezor, and Adrian Piper; and a reader with essays by Diarmuid Costello, Jörg Heiser, Kobena Mercer, Nizan Shaked, Vid Simoniti, and Elvan Zabunyan  – both published by the Museum; and a new autobiographical text by Piper published by the APRA Foundation Berlin. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over ten years and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist at the 56thVenice Biennale in 2015. 
 
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
 
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
 
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; David Platzker, Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.
 
Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
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Bodys Isek Kingelez

May 26, 2018–October 21, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

MoMA presents a full retrospective of Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015), the Congolese sculptor who worked with paper, commercial packaging, and materials from everyday life to create what he called “extreme maquettes” that encompass civic buildings, public monuments, and private pavilions. Bodys Isek Kingelez spans the artist’s career over a 25-year period, ranging from early works that were included in the landmark 1989 exhibition Magiciens de la terre at the Centre Pompidou to his streamlined, dramatic forms of the 2000s. The first retrospective of Kingelez’s work, and the first substantial monographic presentation of his work in the US, this exhibition features works from each of the key periods of his career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. Kingelez was previously featured in the MoMA exhibition Projects 59: Architecture as Metaphor (1997). Although his work has long been featured in major international exhibitions, this will the first opportunity in New York to explore the full breadth of his career. 

The exhibition unfolds as a chronological display with a thematic approach, bringing together works made during the artist’s first trip to Paris in 1989, civic structures, public monuments, and fantastic takes on geographically specific architectural tropes. The installation captures his transition from single buildings to entire metropolises, culminating in a selection of Kingelez’s large-scale cities, marked by soaring forms that characterize much of his late production. The exhibition brings together rarely seen works from both public and private collections. Special thanks to the artist Carsten Höller (German, born 1961), who is developing a visitor experience project in parallel with the exhibition.

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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