Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA and MoMA PS1

Disappearing Acts: Bruce Nauman, 1964-2018

October 2018 – January 2019

Floor Six, Exhibition Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art and Schaulager, Basel, announce their collaboration on a full retrospective devoted to the work of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941). Opening at Schaulager in March 2018 and traveling to The Museum of Modern Art in October of that year, the exhibition will be the first comprehensive retrospective of the artist’s work across all mediums in over 20 years, and will build upon the rich holdings of the two organizing institutions. Covering his entire career, from the earliest fully realized sculptures of 1965 to his most recent work, the exhibition will provide an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and neon, to performance, video, film, sculpture, and large-scale installations—including Days (2009), a 14-channel sound installation for which Nauman won the Golden Lion for Best National Participation at the Venice Biennial in 2009.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

The exhibition is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director and Laurenz Foundation Curator, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with Heidi Naef, Senior Curator, Schaulager, Basel, and Isabel Friedli, Curator, Schaulager, Basel, Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

Generous funding is provided by Ellen and William Taubman.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Modern Mondays

Ongoing

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

Building upon the Museum’s eight-decade tradition of fostering cinematic innovation and experimentation, Modern Mondays invites artists working in the expanded field of film, video, performance, and sound to present their work in an intimate setting. A platform for both emerging artists and pioneering figures who have changed the way we think about the moving image, this series premieres new projects and rediscovers landmark works. Considering avant-garde narratives from the 21st century, the program also celebrates legacies of influential historical figures in a contemporary context. Each evening presents a unique opportunity for audiences to engage in dialogue with artists, along with curators and other guests.

An Evening with Molly Lowe
Monday, May 8, 7:00 p.m., T2
Molly Lowe, a New York–based filmmaker, sculptor, painter, and performance artist, presents the theatrical premieres of her recent films Redwood (2016, commissioned by Pioneer Works) and Formed (2013). In Redwood, a sensuous intermingling of sci-fi conjecture and family portraiture, masks and ritualistic movements—like those in Japanese Noh theater and the films of Maya Deren—are a stylized rictus of pleasure, fear, and pain. What endures, Lowe asks, when our bodies age and our minds become a tangle of memory and desire? What do we pass on to our daughters and granddaughters through our genes and through the stories we tell? Formed is a Surrealist grotesquerie involving squishy eggs, Spandex, and a wayward computer mouse; protuberant sticky tongues and cavernous orifices; cries of joy and sadness; and bodies groping, yearning, and pratfalling in the limelight.

An Evening with Filipa César
Monday, June 26, 7:00 p.m., T2
The Portuguese-born, Berlin-based artist and filmmaker Filipa César presents an evening of short films in advance of a weeklong MoMA run of her first feature, Spell Reel. César’s work exists at the intersection of fiction and documentary, exploring history, place, and identity through intertwined personal and national narratives. Characterized by rigorous structural and lyrical elements, her multiform meditations often focus on Portuguese colonialism and the liberation of Guinea-Bissau in the 1960s and 1970s. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Nuno Lisboa, 2017 Flaherty Seminar Programmer, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film. This event is presented in conjunction with the 2017 Robert Flaherty Film Seminar.

Organized by the Department of Film and the Department of Media and Performance Art.

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Sculpture from the Collection 1960–1969

Opens June 26, 2016

This installation brings together a selection of sculptures from the Museum’s collection made in the 1960s, extending to the Sculpture Garden the current organizing principle of the Museum’s fourth-floor collection galleries. Included are David Smith’s Cubi X (1963), an abstract construction of stainless steel geometric forms that evokes the human figure, and Alexander Calder’s Sandy’s Butterfly (1964), a 13-foot-tall colorful steel sculpture with a mobile top that the artist gave to MoMA in 1966. These works join longtime Sculpture Garden inhabitants, such as Barnett Newman’s Broken Obelisk (1967). Favorites like Pablo Picasso’s She Goat (1950) and Aristide Maillol’s The River (1943) will remain on view alongside these works from the 1960s.

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MoMA Announces Major Gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

October 17, 2016

The Museum of Modern Art announced that it has received a major gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, which will add more than 100 works of modern art by major artists from Latin America to the Museum’s collection, and establish the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America. The Cisneros Institute will be dedicated to an expansive approach to the study and interpretation of modern and contemporary art from Latin America.

The gift includes 102 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, made between the 1940s and the 1990s by 37 artists working in Brazil, Venezuela, and the Río de la Plata region of Argentina and Uruguay, including Lygia Clark, Hélio Oiticica, Lygia Pape, Jesús Rafael Soto, Alejandro Otero, and Tomás Maldonado. They join 40 works previously given by Patricia and Gustavo Cisneros over the last 16 years; Mrs. Cisneros is a longtime MoMA Trustee and a member of several acquisitions and funding committees, including the Latin American and Caribbean Fund, of which she is chairman and founder.

The Cisneros Institute, to be located on MoMA’s Midtown Manhattan campus, will offer opportunities for curatorial research and travel, host visiting scholars and artists, convene an annual international conference, and produce research publications on art from Latin America. It is poised to become the preeminent research center in the field, building on MoMA’s history of collecting, exhibiting, and studying the art and artists of the region, dating back to 1931. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works by artists from Latin America.

The breadth of this gift is unprecedented, and the accompanying research initiative devoted to the study of the works and their integration into the overall narrative of modern art will greatly enrich MoMA’s collection and scholarly activities. As an integral program of The Museum of Modern Art, the Cisneros Institute represents a singular commitment to the region, and will foster intensive research on and engagement with the region’s art and artists.

For more information and a full list of works, please visit: www.moma.org/collection/works/groups/cisneros

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Young Architects Program 2017: Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio

Opens June 29, 2017

MoMA PS1

Lumen by Jenny Sabin Studio has been named the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program. Opening on June 29 in the MoMA PS1 courtyard, this year’s construction is an immersive design that evolves over the course of a day, providing a cooling respite from the midday sun and a responsive glowing light after sundown. Drawn from among five finalists, Jenny Sabin Studio’s Lumen will serve as a temporary urban landscape for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Now in its 18th edition, the Young Architects Program at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 has offered emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling.

Made of responsive tubular structures in a lightweight knitted fabric, Lumen features a canopy of recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and deliver light. A misting system responds to visitors’ proximity, activating fabric stalactites that produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s multisensory environment is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure and materials transform throughout the day and night, adapting to the densities of bodies, heat, and sunlight.

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Inbox: Steve McQueen

May 6–Summer 2017

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

The Museum of Modern Art will display Static (2009), a recently acquired digital projection of a 35mm film by the artist and filmmaker Steve McQueen (British, born 1969), in The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium from May 6 through summer 2017. The installation is part of MoMA’s ongoing Inbox series, which highlights new acquisitions to the Museum’s collection. Shot from a helicopter circling the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island, in New York Harbor, the film captures Lady Liberty both in furtive, detailed close-ups and from a greater remove. As suggested by the work’s title, the statue remains fixed, intended to be gazed at from afar, even as the many perspectives from which it is encountered are subject to change. Accompanied by the roaring sound of the helicopter blades, the piece is marked by unease and uncertainty, showcasing and scrutinizing one of the most iconic symbols of the US within the urban surroundings of New York City and New Jersey. This is the first time Static will be shown on the scale of a major civic space. The film was made in 2009 to coincide with President Barack Obama’s motion to reopen the Statue of Liberty to the public on July 4th as a special gift to the US after the monument’s eight-year closure following the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Inbox is an ongoing series of installations that began in 2014 to showcase new additions to MoMA’s collection. The Museum’s first brochure in 1929 outlined its “ultimate purpose” as “to acquire, from time to time, (either by gift of by purchase) a collection of the best modern works of art.” This process remains central to the Museum’s mission and, as such, MoMA acquires a diverse selection of modern and contemporary artworks every year. Previous Inbox installations have included: Inbox: Jasper Johns, Inbox: The Original Emoji, by Shigetaka Kurita, Inbox: August Sander, Inbox: Channa Horwitz, Inbox: Glenn Ligon, and Inbox: Haegue Yang, Spice Moons.

Organized by the Department of Media and Performance Art.

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MoMA PS1 Building Images

Ongoing

Images of MoMA PS1’s building are located through Press Access.

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VW Sunday Sessions: Hannah Black, OR LIFE OR

April 9, 2017

MoMA PS1

British artist and writer Hannah Black will present a new performance work, OR LIFE OR, as the 2017 VW Sunday Sessions Commission on April 9. A collaboration with composer and musician Bonaventure and artist and designer Ebba Fransén Waldhör, OR LIFE OR takes place within a site-specific, immersive environment in the VW Dome.

This is a new iteration of an ongoing performance work which has previously been staged at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, at the Berlin Biennale, and at mumok in Vienna. The text, performance and set are loosely based around a constellation of reference points: a superhero figure called Anxietina, the Wikipedia entry for “life,” theories of political struggle, and the twin spectres of apocalypse and ancestry. The performance takes place in an environment conceived by Black and Waldhör that features colored reflective pools, laser projected extracts from the script, and handcrafted banners.

MoMA PS1’s acclaimed VW Sunday Sessions program welcomes visitors to experience art live and in real time. Embracing performance, music, dance, conversations, and moving images the program vividly demonstrates how these art forms can push us to engage with our contemporary world in creative, illuminating ways. With an emphasis on artistic practices that blur and break traditional genre boundaries, the program supports and commissions new work, inviting artists, curators, and other cultural instigators to share their latest projects.  

VW Sunday Sessions is organized by Jenny Schlenzka, Associate Curator with Alex Sloane, Curatorial Assistant; Taja Cheek, Curatorial Assistant; Rosey Selig-Addiss, Associate Producer; and Lucy Lie, Production Coordinator.

VW Sunday Sessions and the VW Dome at MoMA PS1 are made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America, who have supported the program for five years since its inception.

#VWSundaySessions

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The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries, Fifth Floor

Ongoing

Fifth floor

The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries feature on the fifth floor roughly span the years 1880 to 1940. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Post-Impressionism, Cubism, the work of Henri Matisse, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, and Surrealism, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. 

Browse selected works on view.

 

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Touring and Off-Site Exhibitions

Ongoing

BRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
February 21–May 22, 2017

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (KNW), Düsseldorf, Germany
March 4–June 11, 2017

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from the Museum of Modern Art
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virgina
March 10–June 18, 2017

Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire
September 30–April 9, 2017

Robert Rauschenberg
Tate Modern, London, England
November 30, 2016–April 9, 2017

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
November 4, 2017–March 25, 2018

Masterworks from MoMA
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
June 8–October 7, 2018

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Young Architects Program International

Ongoing

With its international partnerships, Young Architects Program (YAP) offers selected young designers and architects across the globe the opportunity to create designs that promote diverse uses such as rest, play, and relaxation as well as hosting a series of live events such as shows, music, dance, exhibitions, and performances. In addition architects are encouraged to address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling, to create highly innovative projects that provide shade, seating, and water. To achieve these goals, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are currently partnering with the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI) in Rome, CONSTRUCTO in Chile, and Istanbul Modern in Turkey (on a biennial cycle).

In May 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul announced a new partnership that further expands the international YAP to South Korea. YAP Korea provides opportunities for emerging architects in South Korea to create temporary exterior installations for summer programming at the MMCA.

A dedicated YAP International website, MoMA.org/yap, features the selected proposals and designs from the winner of YAP International. The website also includes an archive of past MoMA/MoMA PS1 YAP finalists and winning proposals, interviews with the curators, and installation videos.

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From the Collection: 1960–1969

March 26, 2016–March 12, 2017

The Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Painting and Sculpture Galleries, fourth floor

With From the Collection: 1960–1969, The Museum of Modern Art reinstalls its fourth-floor collection galleries with works from all six of its curatorial departments, along with work from the MoMA Library and archives collection. The presentation is organized through the lens of the 1960s, when interdisciplinary artistic experimentation flourished and traditional mediums were radically transformed. Artistic change paralleled sociopolitical upheaval around the globe, and these seismic shifts reach to the present moment. The galleries feature works across mediums, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, architecture, design objects, videos, films, and archival materials. The presentation will undergo periodic reinstallations over the course of the year, reflecting the depth and richness of the Museum’s collection and the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art.

The installation includes a range of works from the 1960s, including a Jaguar E-Type Roadster (1961), a selection from Bela Kolárová’s photographic body of work Radiogram of Circle (1962–63), Nam June Paik’s Zen for TV (1963), James Rosenquist’s F-111 (1964–65), Jo Baer’s Primary Light Group: Red, Green, Blue (1964-65), Robert Smithson’s drawing A Heap of Language (1966), Bonnie Maclean’s poster for the Yardbirds and the Doors (1967), Eva Hesse’s Repetition Nineteen (1968), a group of works related to Superstudio’s The Continuous Monument: New York Extrusion Project, New York, New York (1969), and Nalini Malani’s film Dream Houses (1969), among many others.

Each gallery is dedicated to works from a single year, and the galleries proceed in chronological order. This approach provides a framework for displaying a wide-ranging selection of objects from the Museum’s collection, offering visitors a rare opportunity to see an automobile in proximity to an oil painting, an etching juxtaposed with an architectural model, or a film alongside a sculpture. The organizational principles vary throughout: some galleries explore the potential of unexpected connections across mediums and genres while others gather works that are similar in materials or function. 

From the Collection: 1960–1969 is made possible by Hyundai Card and Hyundai Capital America.
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Nan Goldin: The Ballad of Sexual Dependency

June 11, 2016–April 16, 2017

Contemporary Galleries, second floor

Beginning in June 2016, The Museum of Modern Art is reinstalling its second-floor contemporary galleries with three large-scale, single-work installations by contemporary artists Teiji Furuhashi, Nan Goldin, and Tony Oursler. Presented in distinct galleries, the featured works on view are Furuhashi’s Lovers (1994), Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004), and Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16). Immersive in their construction and generous in size, the three large-scale galleries provide MoMA’s visitors with a unique opportunity to have deep encounters with these monumental works.

Comprising almost 700 snapshot-like portraits sequenced against an evocative music soundtrack, Nan Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a deeply personal narrative, formed out of the artist’s own experiences around Boston, New York, Berlin, and elsewhere in the late 1970s, 1980s, and beyond. Titled after a song in Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s The Threepenny Opera, Goldin’s Ballad is itself a kind of downtown opera; its protagonists—including the artist herself—are captured in intimate moments of love and loss. They experience ecstasy and pain through sex and drug use; they revel at dance clubs and bond with their children at home; and they suffer from domestic violence and the ravages of AIDS. “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is the diary I let people read,” Goldin wrote. “The diary is my form of control over my life. It allows me to obsessively record every detail. It enables me to remember.” The Ballad developed through multiple improvised live performances, for which Goldin ran through the slides by hand and friends helped prepare the soundtrack—from Maria Callas to The Velvet Underground—for an audience not unlike the subjects of the pictures. The Ballad is presented in its original 35mm format, along with photographs from the Museum’s collection that also appear as images in the slide show. Introducing the installation is a selection of materials from the artist’s archive, including posters and flyers announcing early iterations of The Ballad. Live performances will periodically accompany The Ballad during the course of the Museum’s presentation; performance details will be announced during the course of the exhibition presentation. The installation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1; Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, MoMA; and Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

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Tony Oursler: Imponderable

June 18, 2016–April 16, 2017

Yoshiko and Akio Morita Gallery and Contemporary Galleries, second floor

Beginning in June 2016, The Museum of Modern Art is reinstalling its second-floor contemporary galleries with three large-scale, single-work installations by contemporary artists Teiji Furuhashi, Nan Goldin, and Tony Oursler. Presented in distinct galleries, the featured works on view are Furuhashi’s Lovers (1994), Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004), and Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16). Immersive in their construction and generous in size, the three large-scale galleries provide MoMA’s visitors with a unique opportunity to have deep encounters with these monumental works.

Tony Oursler’s Imponderable offers an alternative depiction of modernism that reveals the intersection of technological advancements and occult phenomena over the last two centuries. Presented in a “5-D” cinematic environment utilizing a contemporary form of Pepper’s ghost—a 19th-century phantasmagoric device—and a range of sensory effects, Imponderable is an immersive feature-length film inspired by Oursler’s own archive of ephemera relating to stage magic, spirit photography, pseudoscience, telekinesis, and other manifestations of the paranormal. Drawing on these objects, Imponderable weaves together a social, spiritual, and empirical history of the virtual image that overlaps with the artist’s own family history. The cast of characters, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Mina “Margery” Crandon, and members of Oursler’s family, is portrayed by an eclectic ensemble of artists, musicians, and performers, including Kim Gordon, Jim Fletcher, Keith Sanborn, and Constance DeJong. Bringing together Oursler’s ongoing interest in mysticism, psychedelia, popular culture, and media history, the work uses macabre humor and theatrical surrealism to reflect on the irrational relationship between belief systems and the authenticity of images. Imponderable is presented in conjunction with selections from Oursler’s archive relating to the film. The exhibition is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, and Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA. 

This exhibition coincides with Tony Oursler: The Imponderable Archive, on view at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, June 25–October 30, 2016.

Imponderable was originally commissioned and produced by the LUMA Foundation for the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France, and LUMA Westbau, Zurich, Switzerland, 2015.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Generous funding for Tony Oursler: Imponderable is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

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FORTY

June 19, 2016–August 28, 2016

MoMA PS1

Organized by P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center founder, Alanna Heiss, FORTY features work by over 40 artists who were key participants in the 1970s alternative art spaces movement and the early years of P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center. In 1976, Alanna Heiss founded P.S.1 as the latest venture in a series of pioneering projects organized through her non-profit organization, the Institute for Art and Urban Resources, which included the Clocktower Gallery in lower Manhattan and other disused spaces across New York City. With both the intellectual and physical room to experiment, nearly 80 artists created work for P.S.1’s inaugural 1976 show, Rooms, which has since become a landmark in the art history of 1970s New York. The artists used classrooms, stairwells, windows, closets, bathrooms, the boiler room, courtyard, and attic—often engaging directly with the existing architecture. Rooms catalyzed changes in the forms and methods of making art, and expanded ideas about how it could be shown.

Four decades later, FORTY revisits the work of many of the artists who participated in the inaugural exhibition, in some cases featuring works shown in Rooms. Presented across the museum’s second floor galleries, FORTY revisits the radical vision and experimental spirit that characterized P.S.1’s early years.

FORTY features work by Cecile Abish, Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, John Baldessari, Jennifer Bartlett, Lynda Benglis, James Bishop, Daniel Buren, Colette, Ron Gorchov, Dan Graham, Robert Grosvenor, Marcia Hafif, David Hammons, Jene Highstein, Nancy Holt, Bill Jensen, Richard “Dickie” Landry, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Gordon Matta-Clark, John McCracken, Mary Miss, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Brian O’Doherty, Dennis Oppenheim, Nam June Paik, Howardena Pindell, Robert Ryman, Alan Saret, Joel Shapiro, Judith Shea, Charles Simonds, Keith Sonnier, Pat Steir, Michelle Stuart, Lawrence Weiner, Doug Wheeler, Jackie Winsor, and Robert Yasuda.

Listening stations throughout the exhibition highlight a series of audio conversations between Alanna Heiss and participating artists. Produced in connection with FORTY by Clocktower Productions, a non-profit arts organization and radio station directed by Alanna Heiss, the series provides visitors with an intimate view into P.S.1’s early history. The full audio guide is available online at: momaps1.org/forty.

Organized by Alanna Heiss, Founding Director, MoMA PS1, and Director, Clocktower Productions, with Beatrice Johnson, Associate Curator, Clocktower Productions; and Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

The exhibition is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America.

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Teiji Furuhashi: Lovers

July 30, 2016–April 16, 2017

Contemporary Galleries, second floor

Beginning in June 2016, The Museum of Modern Art is reinstalling its second-floor contemporary galleries with three large-scale, single-work installations by contemporary artists Teiji Furuhashi, Nan Goldin, and Tony Oursler. Presented in distinct galleries, the featured works on view are Furuhashi’s Lovers (1994), Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004), and Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16). Immersive in their construction and generous in size, the three large-scale galleries provide MoMA’s visitors with a unique opportunity to have deep encounters with these monumental works.

Lovers is an immersive, room-sized multimedia installation by Japanese artist Teiji Furuhashi (1960–1995). Life-sized images of the artist and other members of the Kyoto-based artist collective Dumb Type are projected onto the walls of a darkened room from a tower of computer-controlled video and slide projectors at its center. The figures move like specters around the perimeter of the space, in a looped choreographic sequence made variable by a visitor-activated sensor, which intervenes to restart one of the projections when triggered. Confined to their autonomous projections, these eponymous “lovers” overlap at moments within the sequence, whether running past each other or pausing in a gesture of embrace, yet their bodies never make contact. Made just one year before Furuhashi’s death from an AIDS-related illness, Lovers speaks to what the artist has described as “the theme of contemporary love in an ultra-romantic way.” Presented for the first time since its inaugural exhibition at MoMA in 1995, the installation showcases the results of an extensive conservation effort recently completed by the Museum’s media conservators. The installation is organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, MoMA, and Director, MoMA PS1; Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film, MoMA; and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA. 

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

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Kai Althoff: and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern)

September 18, 2016–January 22, 2017

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery, sixth floor

Press Preview: Tuesday, September 13, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

On the occasion of Kai Althoff: and then leave me to the common swifts (und dann überlasst mich den Mauerseglern), the artist provides the following statement:

“The Museum of Modern Art granted me all freedom in using the gallery’s space and the Museum’s profound resources to present my work in the manner that I deem appropriate at this time of its existence and my life. I am very thankful for this, for even if I strain and press myself to come to a conclusion regarding the past, a lot of the things—and many call this work—I made up until today, I cannot defend or think of it as something people need to see or bother with. These were often just done for myself in the very first place.

Yet to leave it to others to put them in order and arrange them for display and consumption as a somewhat logical consequence deriving from this lack of my own ability to analyze and emotionally realize their gravity feels impossible and wrong; I am still alive, and this is an institution with a history that one cannot forego naïvely, though it may mean nothing much to me. Thus I feel I have to just show it in the manner that my mere self tells me to now. I have to look at things I have fabricated earlier in life, and I will give in to my immediate reaction emotionally and handle them accordingly, when deciding what to do with them now. This is why my gratitude for the above mentioned freedom from the institution is so huge.

Mind you, this is not all my pure will, but comes from the task of putting together a show, which I was asked to do, despite my confidence terrifyingly wobbling. And that it is for the right reasons, it being so wobbly, because of how wrong one can be in reality, when one thinks one does something significantly grand with the mind, heart and hands. But in the moment of making, the object you muster gains power over you and sometimes indeed this power may stem from the highest entity, from all that is beyond words and for a human to grapple. This I believe must have a reason, which in itself is more beautiful than a failed result, or a mediocre result. This happens in everybody’s life. There is no reason really why my things are exhibited in a museum and others’ are not.

And yet it is true: sometimes results are really something more. If there is such within what I did, I am not to say. But the people, who will come to see it can tell. I trust them totally, whether they care about art or not. Whether they are informed or ignorant and full of resentment. They do not need to know of more than what they will experience, and they should know, there is nothing to be understood. They have already understood enough, they can answer questions themselves and the questions they cannot answer themselves when walking, seeing, smelling and feeling while strutting through this exhibition are superfluous for now, and may clarify sometime later, or remain shelled forever.”

Kai Althoff

Organized by Laura Hoptman, Curator, and Margaret Ewing, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by the Ringier Collection, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Special thanks to Craig Robins and Jackie Soffer and to Erik Bruce Fabrik.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter

October 01, 2016–January 22, 2017

Dunn Gallery, second floor

Press Preview: Thursday, September 29, 2016, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

The ways in which architecture and design have addressed contemporary notions of shelter, as seen through migration and global refugee emergencies, will be explored in the exhibition Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter. Bringing together works by architects, designers, and artists in a range of mediums and scales that respond to the complex circumstances brought about by forced displacement, the exhibition focuses on conditions that disrupt conventional images of the built environment as an arbiter of modernity and globalization. The prevalence of shelters and refugee camps calls into question the “safety” that they represent. Insecurities is organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, with Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Recent United Nations figures suggest that 65 million individuals worldwide are refugees, asylum seekers, and internally displaced persons. Where borders once marked the peripheries of nations, today, manifold territories on sea and land have blurred one’s potential confinement within spaces that are determined by external powers. Under these conditions, shelter has been redefined through constant movement or escape. By extension, refugee camps, while once considered to be temporary, are no longer so, and have become a locus through which to examine how human rights intersect with and complicate the making of cities.

Insecurities brings together a range of objects, including the jointly-designed IKEA Foundation-UNHCR-Better Shelter modular emergency structure, along with works by Estudio Teddy Cruz, Henk Wildschut, and Tiffany Chung, among others. Insecurities raises questions regarding how the design and representation of shelter as a source of security and stability ultimately reflects how refugees are living in permanent upheaval today.

A complementary website on Medium includes short essays and additional visual material by scholars, architects, artists, and designers from around the world.

Insecurities is part of Citizens and Borders, a series of discrete projects at MoMA related to works in the collection offering a critical perspective on histories of migration, territory, and displacement.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.
 
Additional support is provided by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.
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How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior

October 01, 2016–April 23, 2017

Third Floor Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, September 29, 2016, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

With How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior, The Museum of Modern Art examines a range of environments—domestic interiors, exhibition displays, and retail spaces—with the aim of exploring the complex collaborative partnerships, materials, and processes that have shaped the modernist interior. The exhibition focuses on specific interior spaces from the 1920s to the 1950s. Rather than concentrating on isolated masterworks, attention is given to the synthesis of design elements within each setting, and to the connection of external factors and attitudes—aesthetic, social, technological, and political—that these propositions express in material and spatial form.

Bringing together a number of recent acquisitions by the Department of Architecture and Design of work by major women architect-designers, How Should We Live? looks at several designers’ own living spaces and at frequently neglected areas in the field of design, including textile furnishings, wallpapers, kitchens, temporary exhibitions, and promotional displays. Noted partnerships featured in the exhibition will include Lilly Reich and Mies van der Rohe, Grete Lihotzky and Ernst May, Eileen Gray and Jean Badovici, Aino and Alvar Aalto, Charles and Ray Eames, Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter, and Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier.

Divided into three chronological groupings—the late 1920s to the early 1930s, the late 1930s to the mid-1940s, and the late 1940s into the 1950s—the exhibition brings together over 200 objects in total, but highlights a number of large-scale interiors by the aforementioned designers, including Lihotzky’s Frankfurt Kitchen (1926–27), Reich and Mies’s Velvet and Silk Café (1927), and Perriand and Le Corbusier’s study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil (1959).

Organized by Juliet Kinchin, Curator, with Luke Baker, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Making Faces: Images of Exploitation and Empowerment in Cinema

October 14, 2016–May 07, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Lobby

Making Faces presents a selection of images from the Department of Film’s extensive collection of film stills that explore the representation of historical “otherness” onscreen. This exhibition examines the attempts of commercial film studios to aestheticize identity at various historical moments. Photographic enlargements capture both conscious and unconscious deviations from cultural, social, racial, and gender expectations from the silent era through the Blaxploitation films of the 1970s.

Organized by Ashley Swinnerton, Collection Specialist, and Dessane Cassell, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Film.

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Projects 105: Cinthia Marcelle

October 23, 2016–September 04, 2017

Duplex Gallery and Cinema, MoMA PS1

Projects 105 presents Education by Stone (2016), a new site-specific installation by Cinthia Marcelle (Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1974) and the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York. Recently selected to represent Brazil at the 2017 Venice Biennale, Marcelle is known for her installations, performances, and videos, which stage forms of labor to produce poetic situations. Occupying MoMA PS1’s Duplex gallery, the installation will insert chalk, a pedagogical material to which she has re-turned throughout her career, in the building’s formerly scholastic space. Numerous rods of chalk will be lodged into the fissures and openings of the gallery’s brick walls from floor to ceiling, revealing the material’s inherent instability and fragility.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Cinthia Marcelle has had solo exhibitions in South America and Europe. She recently participated in the 11th Sharjah Biennial (2015), and will represent Brazil in the 57th Venice Biennale (2017). In 2006, she was the recipient of the International Prize for Performance for her work Gray Demonstration (2006). In 2010, she was awarded the Future Generation Prize.

Organized by Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by The Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Sascha Braunig: Shivers

October 23, 2016–March 12, 2017

MoMA PS1

With more than twenty works made over the last five years, Shivers showcases Braunig’s unique approach to the studio portrait. Beginning with meticulously rendered paintings of fantastical sculptural constructions, the artist has deployed a range of pictorial techniques to depict bodies under duress. The figures in her work are compressed by their environments, stretched and twisted across armatures, and often overwhelmed by their surroundings. Some are irradiated by industrial light, sutured into uncomfortable hybrids, and hollowed out. Drawing inspiration from the distorted bodies that litter the histories of modern painting, Braunig adapts these legacies to the discomforts and instabilities of contemporary life. In more recent works, her figures seem to turn on themselves, testing their own limits and those of the settings that confine them. While evocatively dystopic, her paintings also subtly empower their vulnerable subjects, advocating a humanist art for an age in which individual experience seems threatened by forces beyond our control.

Sascha Braunig: Shivers is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1.

The exhibition is supported by the Ava Olivia Knoll Fund and The Tom Slaughter Emerging Artists Endowment Fund.

Additional funding is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Mark Leckey: Containers and Their Drivers

October 23, 2016–March 05, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first comprehensive survey of the pioneering British artist Mark Leckey in the United States, and the largest exhibition of his work to date. Since coming to prominence in the late 1990s, his dynamic and varied practice has helped give form to the transition from analog to digital culture, and powerfully influenced younger generations of artists. Occupying two floors of MoMA PS1, the exhibition will bring together major bodies of Leckey’s art, including a broad array of video works and sculptural installations alongside new pieces made specifically for the exhibition. Among the highlights will be Leckey’s breakthrough film Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore (1999), which uses sampled footage to trace dance subcultures in British nightclubs from the 1970s to 1990s; a selection of the artist’s Sound System sculptures (2001-2012), functioning stacks of audio speakers that recall those used in street music parties in London; his pedagogical lecture performances; GreenScreenRefrigeratorAction (2010), a video and installation that consider “smart” objects and our increasingly technological environment; a significant installation UniAddDumThs(2014), which Leckey created as a “copy” of a touring exhibition, The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things, that he had curated the year before; and an expanded presentation of works relating to his recent autobiographical film Dream English Kid 1964–1999 AD (2015).

Mark Leckey: Containers and Their Drivers is co-organized by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art.

Mark Leckey (b. 1964, United Kingdom) was awarded the Turner Prize in 2008 and has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at institutions including Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany (2015); WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels, Belgium (2014); the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2013); Nottingham Contemporary, Nottingham, UK (2013); Banff Centre, Banff, Canada (2012); and the Serpentine Gallery, London, UK, (2011). He has participated in the Carnegie International (2013), the 55th Venice Biennale (2013), and the 8th Gwangju Biennial (2010). Leckey lives and works in London.

 

The exhibition is made possible by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Major support is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art and the Maurice Marciano Family Foundation.

Additional funding is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.

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The Shape of Things: Photographs from Robert B. Menschel

October 29, 2016–May 07, 2017

The Paul J. Sachs Galleries, second floor

The Shape of Things: Photographs from Robert B. Menschel presents an engaging survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s multifaceted collection of photography. Borrowing its title from the eponymous work by Carrie Mae Weems, the exhibition is drawn entirely from works acquired over the past 40 years with the support of Robert B. Menschel, telling the story of photography from its beginnings.

Covering more than 150 years of photography—from an 1843 view of Paris by William Henry Fox Talbot, the English father of photography, to An-My Lê’s depictions of US military exercises in preparation for war in Iraq and Afghanistan—the exhibition underscores an equal attention to the past and the present, and a strong belief that they complement each other; and that each generation reinvents photography. Since Menschel joined the Committee on Photography at MoMA in 1977, over 500 works have entered the collection through his support, including 162 photographs he recently donated from his personal collection.
 

Organized by Quentin Bajac, the Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, with Katerina Stathopoulou, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography, MoMA.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction

November 21, 2016–March 19, 2017

The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor

Press Preview: Tuesday, November 15, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction is the first major exhibition in the U.S. to encompass the full range of Picabia’s audacious, provocative, and profoundly influential career. MoMA’s first-ever monographic exhibition of the artist, Francis Picabia brings together some 200 works in multiple mediums to explore the artist’s critical place in the history of 20th-century art.

Among the great modern artists, Francis Picabia (French, 1879–1953) remains one of the most elusive; he vigorously avoided any one singular style or medium, and his work encompassed painting, performance, poetry, publishing, and film. Though he is best known as one of the leaders of the Dada movement, his career ranged widely—and wildly—from Impressionism to radical abstraction, from Dadaist provocation to pseudo-classicism, and from photo-based realism to art informel. Picabia’s contributions to a diverse range of artistic mediums, along with his consistent inconsistencies, make him especially relevant for contemporary artists, and his career as a whole challenges familiar narratives of modernism.

Francis Picabia—conceived in partnership with the Kunsthaus Zürich, where its presentation is scheduled to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Cabaret Voltaire, in 1916—assembles key selections and bodies of work, ranging in date from the first decade of the 20th century through the early 1950s. Picabia’s work as a painter—albeit one whose oeuvre consistently contests the term—will be represented, along with his activities as a publisher and contributor to vanguard journals, and his forays into screenwriting and theater. The core of the exhibition comprises some 125 paintings, along with approximately 45 key works on paper, one film, and a carefully chosen selection of printed matter.

Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Kunsthaus Zürich.

Organized by Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Cathérine Hug, Curator, Kunsthaus Zürich; with Talia Kwartler, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by Lawrence B. Benenson.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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One and One Is Four: The Bauhaus Photocollages of Josef Albers

November 23, 2016–April 02, 2017

Floor 5

Josef Albers (American, born Germany, 1888–1976) is a central figure in 20th-century art, both as a practitioner and as a teacher at the Bauhaus, Black Mountain College, and Yale University. Best known for his iconic series Homages to the Square, Albers made paintings, drawings, and prints and designed furniture and typography. The least familiar aspect of his extraordinary career is his inventive engagement with photography, which was only discovered after his death. The highlight of this work is undoubtedly the photocollages featuring photographs he made at the Bauhaus between 1928 and 1932. At once expansive and restrained, this remarkable body of work anticipates concerns that Albers would pursue throughout his career: seriality, perception, and the relationship between handcraft and mechanical production.

The first serious exploration of Albers’s photographic practice occurred in a modest exhibition at MoMA in 1988, The Photographs of Josef Albers. In 2015, the Museum acquired 10 photocollages by Albers—adding to the two donated by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation almost three decades ago—making its collection the most significant anywhere outside the Foundation. This installation celebrates both this landmark acquisition and the publication of One and One Is Four: The Bauhaus Photocollages of Josef Albers, which focuses exclusively on this deeply personal and inventive aspect of Albers’s work and makes many of these photocollages available for the first time.

Organized by Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography.

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A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde

December 03, 2016–March 12, 2017

South Gallery, third floor

The Museum of Modern Art presents A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde, an exhibition that brings together 260 works from MoMA’s collection, tracing the arc of a period of artistic innovation between 1912 and 1935. Planned in anticipation of the centennial year of the 1917 Russian Revolution, the exhibition highlights breakthrough developments in the conception of Suprematism and Constructivism, as well as in avant-garde poetry, theater, photography, and film, by such figures as Alexandra Exter, Natalia Goncharova, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Lyubov Popova, Alexandr Rodchenko, Olga Rozanova, Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg, and Dziga Vertov, among others.

The exhibition features a rich cross-section of works across several mediums—opening with displays of pioneering non-objective paintings, prints, and drawings from the years leading up to and immediately following the Revolution, followed by a suite of galleries featuring photography, film, graphic design, and utilitarian objects, a transition that reflects the shift of avant-garde production in the 1920s. Made in response to changing social and political conditions, these works probe and suggest the myriad ways that a revolution can manifest itself in an object.

Organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, Department of Photography and Sarah Suzuki, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Alexandra Bachzetsis’s Massacre: Variations on a Theme

January 17, 2017–January 31, 2017

Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

The Museum of Modern Art presents Alexandra Bachzetsis’s Massacre: Variations on a Theme, a new performance commission consisting of a video installation on view during regular Museum hours, and four ticketed live performances on the evenings of January 24, 25, 27, and 28. Comprising choreography for three dancers and a musical composition for two pianos, Bachzetsis’s performance takes the form of a feverish interchange between violent physical movement and excessive mechanical repetition, with a physical and visual vocabulary drawn from a variety of sources, including Tarantism, classic Northern Soul dancing, and Surrealist imagery. Tickets for the performances are $12 and can be purchased on ShowClix beginning December 16. 

The work of Alexandra Bachzetsis (b. 1974) frequently brings together the tropes and gestures of popular culture with ancient rituals and the choreographic language of landmark figures in dance such as Trisha Brown. In Massacre—literally a “ballet mécanique,” with nods to the brutalistic, industrial rhythms and Dada sensibility of Fernand Léger and Dudley Murphy’s landmark 1924 film—three female dancers perform to a live score for two pianos, one of which is an automatic player piano. The performance alternates between the spasmodic gestures of Tarantism, a dancing mania that appeared in medieval Europe and was believed at the time to be caused by the bite of a tarantula; the circular, up-tempo rhythms of Northern Soul dancing; and the tentative, instinctive cavorting typical of primates. Each sequence of movements is transmitted, almost virally, from one performer to the next.

The images, gestures, and sounds that form Massacre also draw on many precedents from Dada and Surrealism—notably representations of the female form within the work of Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, and Hans Bellmer—as well as a fascination with the formation of gender and sexuality within a culture increasingly shaped by technology.

Massacre: Variations on a Theme is commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Organized at MoMA by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, with Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, and produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art and by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Pianos provided by Yamaha Artist Services, New York.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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MoMA Presents: Ewan McNicol and Anna Sandilands’s Uncertain

March 09, 2017–March 15, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art and IFP’s Screen Forward series present a weeklong presentation of Ewan McNicol and Anna Sandilands’s feature debut Uncertain—previously featured in the 2015 edition of MoMA’s annual Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near series. Uncertain, Texas (population 94), is the obscure home of the film’s three protagonists. Seventy-four-year-old Henry’s precarious living as a fisherman is threatened by a gradual parasitic infestation of the town’s lake. Hunting for sport rather than sustenance, middle-aged ex-con Wayne spends his nights waiting with a rifle, and infinite patience, to kill “Mr. Ed,” a legendarily large wild boar. And 21-year-old diabetic Zach kills small-town boredom and personal angst by drinking so prodigiously his doctor warns he’ll be dead by 35. Uncertain is an exemplary portrait of three generations of men processing personal and political trauma with the scarcest of resources. Levelheaded and deftly shot, the film evokes the traditions of vérité cinema and Southern gothic alike.

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

Uncertain. 2015. USA. Directed by Ewan McNicol, Anna Sandilands. 82 min.
Thursday, March 9, 7:00pm. T2. (Followed by a Q&A with McNicol and Sandilands)
Friday, March 10, 7:00pm. T2.
Saturday, March 11, 4:00pm. T2.
Sunday, March 12, 5:00pm. T2.
Monday, March 13, 7:30pm. T2.
Tuesday, March 14, 7:30pm. T1.
Wednesday, March 15, 4:00pm. T2.

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New Directors/New Films 2017

March 15, 2017–March 26, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center announce the complete lineup for the 46th annual New Directors/New Films (ND/NF), March 15-26. Since 1972, the festival has been an annual rite of early spring in New York City, bringing exciting discoveries from around the world to adventurous moviegoers. Dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging and dynamic filmmaking talent, this year’s festival will screen 29 features and nine short films.

The opening, centerpiece, and closing night selections showcase three exciting new voices in American independent cinema: Geremy Jasper’s Patti Cake$, a breakout hit of Sundance, is opening night; Eliza Hittman’s portrait of a Brooklyn teenager’s sexual awakening, Beach Rats, is the centerpiece selection; and Dustin Guy Defa closes the festival with Person to Person, a day-in-the-life snapshot of a group of eccentric New York characters. This year’s lineup boasts nine North American premieres, seven U.S. premieres, and two world premieres, with features and shorts from 32 countries across five continents.

Organized by a selection committee comprising Rajendra Roy, the Celeste Bartos Chief Curator; La Frances Hui, Associate Curator; Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator and Izzy Lee, Department Assistant, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Dennis Lim, Director of Programming; Florenze Almozini, Associate Director of Programming; Dan Sullivan, Assistant Programmer, and Tyler Wilson, Programming Coordinator, the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

New Directors/New Films is presented by The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center and is supported by the Annual Film Fund of The Museum of Modern Art, Film Society’s New Wave, The New York Times, American Airlines, Variety, Shutterstock, and Row NYC.

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Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection

March 19, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Gallery

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 14, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Unfinished Conversations brings together works by more than a dozen artists, made in the past decade and recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art. The artists that make up this intergenerational selection address current anxiety and unrest around the world and offer critical reflections on the present moment.

The exhibition considers the intertwining themes of social protest, the effect of history on the formation of identity, and how art juxtaposes fact and fiction. From Cairo to St. Petersburg, from The Hague to Recife, the artists in the exhibition observe and interpret acts of state violence and the resistance and activism they provoke. They reexamine historical moments, evoking images of the past and claiming their places within it. They take on contemporary struggles for power, intervening into debates about government surveillance and labor exploitation. Together, these artists look back to traditions both within and beyond the visual arts to imagine possibilities for an uncertain future.

The title of the exhibition is inspired by John Akomfrah’s three-channel video installation The Unfinished Conversation (2012), which chronicles the life and work of the Jamaican-born British cultural theorist Stuart Hall (1932–2014). Hall recognized the power that museum collections have to both shape and reflect culture and communities, contending that they are sources of inspiration “which create thought-provoking visions of our past. They provide testimony to the darkest and brightest of human history.”

Unfinished Conversations includes works by John Akomfrah, Jonathas de Andrade, Anna Boghiguian, Andrea Bowers, Paul Chan, Simon Denny, Samuel Fosso, Iman Issa, Erik van Lieshout, Cameron Rowland, Wolfgang Tillmans, Adrián Villar Rojas, Kara Walker, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

Organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art and Director MoMA PS1; Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, with Elizabeth Henderson, Department Coordinator, Office of the Chief Curator at Large. 

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Additional support for Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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.com/.cn

March 21, 2017–April 30, 2017

K11 Art Foundation Pop-up Space, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

The K11 Art Foundation (KAF) and MoMA PS1 co-present .com/.cn, the first project jointly presented by the two institutions as part of an ongoing research partnership. Co-curated by Klaus Biesenbach and Peter Eleey of MoMA PS1 in New York, com/.cn includes work by Darren Bader, Cao Fei, DIS, Aleksandra Domanovic, Greg Edwards, Li Ming, Liang Wei, Lin Ke, Liu Shiyuan, Miao Ying, Laura Owens, Oliver Payne, Sondra Perry, Wang Xin, and Anicka Yi.

.com/.cn showcases artistic practices in China and the West that respond to, or are affected by, our digital ecosystem. Frequently described as a “network” or a “cloud,” this system is often assumed to be universal, unencumbered by territory, language, law, or national culture. However, distinct regional internets have developed under varying forms of state control, each conditioning different social behaviors, economies, and modes of thought. These variations are particularly evident in comparing artistic responses to the available internets of China and the West, and their respective political and economic systems.

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Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid

March 29, 2017–April 02, 2017

Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

The starting point for Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s Work/Travail/Arbeid is a simple question: Can choreography be performed in the form of an exhibition? To answer that question, one of today’s most important dancer/choreographers reimagined her stage performance Vortex Temporum (2013)—choreographed to the eponymous work by the late French composer Gérard Grisey—for a museum space, away from a conventional theater setting.

Work/Travail/Arbeid is not De Keersmaeker’s first project to be performed in the museum space; in 2011 she performed the solo Violin Phase, part of her very first piece Fase: Four Movements to the Music of Steve Reich (1982), in MoMA’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium. But with Work/Travail/Arbeid the artist imagines the choreography in relation to the practices and protocols of an exhibition. The dancers from De Keersmaeker’s company, Rosas, and the musicians, from the Ictus ensemble, are not simply bringing dance into a museum; they are reinterpreting dance in the space of MoMA’s Marron Atrium in the form of a five-day exhibition, accessible continuously to the audience during public hours. The original hour-long piece has been expanded to a nine-hour cycle, with each hour offering different choreography and combinations of seven dancers and seven musicians. (Vortex Temporum is originally a sextet for piano, flute, clarinet, violin, viola, and cello.) Throughout her career De Keersmaeker has focused on the relationship between music and dance: rather than allow the dance to simply illustrate the music, De Keersmaeker uses music as a defining structure. The relation to music in Vortex Temporum, for example, influenced how she reconceived it for the exhibition. Time and harmonic space are expanded and condensed, creating the vortexes of time suggested by the work’s title.

Work/Travail/Arbeid is an itinerant exhibition, first staged at WIELS in Brussels over nine weeks in 2015; then at Centre Pompidou over nine days in a large square space with glass walls, which invited the city itself into the work; and then moving to Tate Modern in London, in the long rectangular space of the Turbine Hall. Each space presented different challenges of adaptation and reconceptualization, a dynamic that continues with the version being re-choreographed and re-created for the unique dimensions of MoMA’s Marron Atrium.

In each of those cases the result is a project that transforms the very material conditions that have long been essential to dance—and in particular the rigorous structure and choreographic language for which De Keersmaeker is known—into an entirely new form of exhibition. The expanded duration of Work/Travail/Arbeid reveals new insights into the complex conceptual, technical, and physical labor that is essential to the practice of dance.

Organized by Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art; produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and by The General Delegation of the Government of Flanders to the USA.

Piano provided by Steinway & Sons.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with Rosas, Ictus, and WIELS Contemporary Art Centre.

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Latin American Cinema: The State of the Art

March 30, 2017–April 09, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Latin American Cinema: The State of the Art highlights exciting new voices in film from countries such as Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Perú, and Venezuela from March 30 through April 9 in The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters. The seven-film series includes works that illuminate young adult life in Latin America, including Rara (2016) and Alba (2016). Several screenings will feature post-screening discussions with filmmakers, including both Rara and Alba, the opening night film, Magallanes (2015), and Un caballo llamado Elefante (2016).

The series showcases films created with the support of Ibermedia—the intergovernmental organization which, for two decades, has advanced the making of fiction and nonfiction films in Latin America, Portugal, Spain, and, most recently, Italy. By supporting projects in various stages of the filmmaking process, from development and production to distribution, exhibition, and promotion, Ibermedia has been instrumental in elevating artistically significant works and nurturing emerging voices in cinema. Filmmakers who have been supported by Ibermedia include Manoel de Oliveira, Lucrecia Martel, and Miguel Gomes.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Modern Matinees: Mr. Cary Grant

April 05, 2017–May 31, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Cary Grant (American, b. Great Britain, 1904–1986) has always been described as a versatile actor. He possessed a keen wit and comic timing that made him a natural with the rapid banter of screwball comedies, and his charm and elegant good looks propelled him into the rarified company of cinema’s great leading men. From the start of his film career, in 1932, to its conclusion, in 1966, Grant worked with a who’s-who of iconic directors—from George Cukor to Alfred Hitchcock—on everything from outrageous physical comedies to intense dramas and thrillers.

The Bristol, England–born Archibald Leach was spellbound by vaudeville, and joined an acrobatic act called The Penders as a stilt walker. In 1920, Leach arrived in New York, where The Penders performed at the Hippodrome, and he remained in the States for several years. An uninspiring screen test at Paramount Pictures in 1931 nonetheless garnered him a contract—and a demand by studio head B. P. Schulberg that he change his name. Thus Cary Grant was born.

Elegant, mischievous, good-humored, masculine, cheeky, and sensual but never overbearing or pompous, Grant’s greatest gift was his peerless versatility. This series demonstrates that range with highlights from Grant’s three decades in American cinema, drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection. All films are from the US and star Cary Grant.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Maureen Gallace

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

The first survey of paintings by American artist Maureen Gallace, Clear Day features nearly 70 works spanning the artist’s career. For more than 25 years, Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has painted genre scenes drawn from the American landscape and still life traditions. Her small canvases and panels most commonly depict rural pastorals and coastlines, typically featuring nondescript barns or cottages amid dunes and foliage that evoke a nostalgic New England. Recalling holiday cards and vacation snapshots, Gallace’s paintings quietly disturb the reassuring sentimentality of such pictures. Often lacking doors or windows, her houses may seem locked up, or disquietingly open and vulnerable to the elements. Her lush gardens and yards can be obstructed by fences, and paths lead the viewer astray; infinite vistas over the ocean are stacked and collapsed into shallow compositions. From the outset of her career, Gallace has deployed a range of abstract compositional tools to frustrate the romantic enticements of her subject matter and the painterly seductions of her surfaces, giving rise to a quietly remarkable and contemporary body of work.

Maureen Gallace (b. 1960) has exhibited widely, including solo exhibitions at Maureen Paley, London (2016); 303 Gallery, New York (2015); La Conservera, Murcia, Spain (2011); The Art Institute of Chicago (2006); Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2004); Dallas Museum of Art (2003); and Museum Schloss-Hardenberg, Velbert, Germany (1996). Group shows in which she has participated include September 11, MoMA PS1 (2011) and the Whitney Biennial (2010).

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Ian Cheng: EMISSARIES

April 9–September 25, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. museum solo exhibition for Ian Cheng, featuring the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy (2015–17), a series of live simulation works created using a video game engine. Described by the artist as “a video game that plays itself,” the works are comprised of computer-generated simulations like those used in predictive technologies for complex scenarios such as climate change or elections. Populated by a cast of characters and wildlife that interact, intervene, and recombine in open-ended narratives, Cheng’s simulations evolve endlessly as self-contained ecosystems. The exhibition EMISSARIES marks the completion of this series of works, which contemplate timeless questions about evolution, the origins of human consciousness, and ways of relating to a chaotic existence. The trilogy was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is on display for the first time at MoMA PS1.

EMISSARIES is presented as a large-scale installation that transforms the gallery into a portal-like environment for Cheng’s simulations to build, generate, regress, and progress.  The 10-foot-tall projections allow each simulation to unfold at life-size, positioning viewers as observers who can follow the lives of specific characters as they interact within the simulated worlds and each other in an ever-changing environment.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; with Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents Tomáš Rafa: New Nationalisms, an exhibition featuring the work of the Slovakian artist and documentary filmmaker. Since 2009, Rafa (b. Žilina, 1979) has employed the methods of cinéma verité to document what he refers to as “new nationalisms” across Central Europe, creating vivid and stirring portraits of the resurgence of extreme right-wing, xenophobic, and neo-fascist groups in the region.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; and Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1, and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Past Skin

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

In today’s technological environment, we can style, extend, and broadcast ourselves at will, projecting into digital realms that in turn shape us. The six artists in Past Skin take up science historian and cyber-feminist Donna Haraway’s provocation, “Why should our body end at the skin?,” testing the growing porosity between our bodies and habitats in a contemporary world where virtuality is ubiquitous and surreality is increasingly normalized. As much as we exert influence on our bodies and surroundings, the technologies that enable this influence also influence us. No longer simply “users” of technology, we become players renegotiating the stakes of our world, engineering natural and synthetic environments to fulfill social imperatives and emotional needs. Featuring 20 works across a variety of media—including painting, sculpture, drawing, sound, video, and virtual reality—by artists Cui Jie, Jordan Kasey, Hannah Levy, Abigail Lucien, Jillian Mayer, MSHR, and Madelon Vriesendorp, Past Skin highlights works that merge figures with landscapes to examine the state of the contemporary body in and beyond nature.

Past Skin is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

 

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A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976–2000

April 9–September 10, 2017

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents A BIT OF MATTER: The MoMA PS1 Archives, 1976-2000, a selection of archival materials documenting the vast array of artists who worked and exhibited in the museum’s building over the course of its first 25 years. Surveying a period that spans from the institution’s inaugural 1976 exhibition Rooms to its merger with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000, the exhibition brings together hundreds of objects drawn from the MoMA PS1 Archives, including artist’s proposals, exhibition posters, photographs, correspondence, flyers, postcards, residency applications, and other ephemera.

The exhibition is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1; Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1; and Jonathan Lill, Leon Levy Foundation Project Manager, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

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Ecstasy and Irony: Czech Cinema, 1927–1943

April 11, 2017–April 23, 2017

Czech cinema is known today largely for the extraordinary creative flowering, known as the Czechoslovak New Wave, that took place during a relaxation of Soviet domination in the 1960s, producing such major artists as Milos Forman and Ivan Passer. But before (and even during) World War II, Czechoslovakia was home to a highly sophisticated and formally advanced film industry. Programmed in collaboration with the Czech National Film Archive (NFA), this program looks at the wide range of that prewar achievement, including pioneering modernist works like  Přemysl Pražský’s Battalion, Karl Anton’s Tonka of the Gallows, Carl Junghans’s Such Is Life and Vladislav Vančura’s On the Sunny Side; the pointed political comedies of Voskovec and Werich; and the brilliant avant-garde work of Gustav Machatý, including the boldly symbolist Erotikon and his early sound masterpiece From Saturday to Sunday, screening here in the world premiere of a new restoration from the NFA. A selection of rarely screened prints from MoMA’s archive adds a sense of the more popular cinema of the period, with major stars such as Oldřich Nový (in Martin Frič’s Lubitschian masterpiece Kristián) and Hugo Haas (in his film of Karel Čapek’s 1937 anti-Nazi allegory The White Disease).

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Michal Bregant, Executive Director, Národní filmový archive/National Film Archive of the Czech Republic.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

April 15, 2017–August 13, 2017

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, April 11, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Remarks will be livestreamed at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning but still relatively under-recognized achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features nearly 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles, and ceramics by more than 50 artists. Within a trajectory that is at once loosely chronological and synchronous, it includes works that range from the boldly gestural canvases of Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Joan Mitchell; the radical geometries by Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, and Gego; and the reductive abstractions of Agnes Martin, Anne Truitt, and Jo Baer; to the fiber weavings of Magdalena Abakanowicz, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney; and the process-oriented sculptures of Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, and Eva Hesse. The exhibition will also feature many little-known treasures such as collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and recent acquisitions on view for the first time at MoMA by Ruth Asawa, Carol Rama, and Alma Woodsey Thomas.

 

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, Department of Photography, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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Making Faces on Film: A Collaboration with BFI Black Star

April 18, 2017–April 26, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art, in collaboration with the British Film Institute, presents Making Faces on Film, which highlights visions of black representation, empowerment, and exploitation in cinema from the silent-film era through the 1970s. On view April 18 through 26 in the Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters, the series explores how images of blackness have been historically constructed and challenged both within and outside the mainstream film industry. Making Faces on Film, jointly inspired by the MoMA exhibition Making Faces: Images of Exploitation and Empowerment in Cinema and the recent BFI Black Star season, reflects the ethos of both—exploring representations of historical others in film, and the versatility and power of black actors.

Providing vital context for ongoing conversations about the complexities of representing race on screen, Making Faces on Film spotlights a range of iconic performances and forms of storytelling. The series includes the earliest known black-cast film, Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913), starring Bert Williams (who is highlighted here as America’s first pop star); the debut of Sidney Poitier in the taut race-relations noir No Way Out (1950); and a celebration of black female empowerment in the larger-than-life blaxploitation persona of Cleopatra Jones (1973), contrasted with Bush Mama (1975), a vérité-style docudrama from the LA Rebellion movement. A double feature of the delightful musical Stormy Weather (1943), starring Lena Horne and Bill Robinson, and Julie Dash’s Illusions (1982) depicts hard-won opportunities for black performers in the Golden Age of Hollywood. The film series also juxtaposes the iconic with the contemporary, with newly commissioned jazz accompaniment by Braxton Cook for the Body and Soul (1925) screening, and by Braxton Cook with Taber Gable for Lime Kiln Club Field Day.

Introductions by academics, including Michelle Materre, Brandon Harris, and Ed Guerrero, provide current perspectives, as does a night of recent short films by Ephraim Asili, Akosua Adoma Owusu, and Lauren Kelley on April 20, organized at The Studio Museum in Harlem. On April 17, in anticipation of the series, a special Modern Mondays evening with Ja’Tovia Gary presents a selection of screenings and a conversation with the Brooklyn-based filmmaker and documentarian, whose work centers on images of blackness, femininity, and nontraditional origins.

Organized by Dessane Cassell, Joint Fellow, Department of Film, MoMA, and The Studio Museum in Harlem; and Ashley Clark, Season Programmer, BFI Black Star in conjunction with the British Film Institute.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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MoMA Presents: Wojciech Has’s The Noose and How to Be Loved

April 27, 2017–May 03, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Pawel Pawlikowski, director of the Academy Award–winning Ida, has called Wojciech Has (1925–2000) “a completely unrecognized genius, probably the most talented Polish director since the war, with his own sensibility and vision.”

Celebrating the publication of Annette Insdorf’s Intimations: The Cinema of Wojciech Has (Northwestern University Press, 2017), MoMA presents the New York premiere theatrical runs of Has’s feature debut, The Noose (1958), an expressionistic portrait of an alcoholic at the end of his rope; and How to Be Loved (1963), a chamber piece involving a famous radio actress haunted by her wartime past. Insdorf, a professor of film at Columbia University’s School of the Arts and moderator of the Reel Pieces series at Manhattan’s 92nd Street Y, will introduce the opening-night screenings on April 27, and will also sign copies of her book on May 3 at 6:00 p.m.     

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art. Presented in association with The Adam Mickiewicz Institute (Grzegorz Skorupski) and the KADR Studio, Warsaw. Special thanks to Hanna Hartowicz, New York Polish Film Festival; and Tomek Smolarski, Polish Cultural Institute New York. 

 

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Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW

April 30, 2017–July 30, 2017

Floor Six, The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, and The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW is the first major survey in New York of the artist Louise Lawler (American, b. 1947), spanning the 40-year creative output of one of the most influential artists working in the fields of image production and institutional critique. The exhibition takes its title from one of Lawler’s most iconic works, Why Pictures Now (1982), a black-and-white photograph showing a matchbook propped up in an ashtray. Reminiscent of an advertising photograph or a film noir still, it asks the viewer to consider why the work takes the form of a picture, and why the artist is making pictures now. Lawler came of age as part of the Pictures Generation, a loosely knit, highly independent group of artists named for an influential exhibition, Pictures, organized in 1977 by art historian Douglas Crimp at Artists Space in New York. These artists used photography and appropriation-driven strategies to examine the functions and codes of representation. Lawler’s signature style was established in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when she began taking pictures of other artists’ works displayed in collectors’ homes, museums, storage spaces, and auction houses to question the value, meaning, and use of art. WHY PICTURES NOW is organized by Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator, with Kelly Sidley, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and by The Modern Women’s Fund.

Generous funding is provided by the Walton Family Foundation, David Dechman and Michel Mercure, Fotene Demoulas and Tom Coté, Tracy and Gary Mezzatesta, Susan and Arthur Fleischer, Patrice and Louis Friedman, Mark Diker, and by Ann and Mel Schaffer. 

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Son of Universal: More Rediscovered Gems from the Laemmle Years

May 05, 2017–May 16, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Following last summer’s monthlong series Universal Pictures: Restorations and Rediscoveries, MoMA presents another selection of extremely rare films produced during the risk-taking reign of studio head Carl Laemmle, Jr. Work to be screened includes Tod Browning’s ferocious 1930 gangster film Outside the Law, starring a pre–Little Cesar Edward G. Robinson; Tay Garnett’s stylistically audacious allegory Destination Unknown (1931); E. A. Dupont’s risqué Broadway romp Ladies Must Love (1933), and two programs of long-unseen, newly restored musical and comedy shorts, assembled by guest curator Ron Hutchinson of the Vitaphone Project. For individual film listings, visit moma.org/film.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film.

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Moustapha Alassane, Pioneer of the Golden Age of Nigerien Cinema

May 12, 2017–May 15, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

This first North American retrospective of Moustapha Alassane (1942–2015), a pioneer of populist cinema in newly independent Niger in the 1960s and 1970s, is presented in association with La Cinematheque Afrique de l’Institut français. A fabulist who sheathed the sharp sting of his political satire within playful stories of water genies, pugilistic frogs, cowboys, and brave fishermen, Alassane parodied colonialist attitudes toward black Africans, the corrupt despotism of local officials, and the shallow materialism of Niger’s youth in a series of animated, fictional, and ethnographic films that remain beloved and influential even today. The lure of cinema, with its magical play of shadow and light, inspired Alassane to give up his career as a mechanic and turn toward making art for the masses. His earliest animated films were simple projections of cardboard cutouts, but his work quickly matured, leading to friendships and collaborations with Zalia Souley, the dean of Nigerien movie acting, and the French documentarian Jean Rouch and the Canadian animator Norman McLaren. Alassane’s films are vital and imaginative records of Nigerien traditions and rituals: his first feature, Aoure (1962), presents the married life of a young Zharma (ethnic Muslim) couple on the banks of the Niger River; his 1973 film Shaki documents the ascension of a Yoruban king and the syncretic intermingling of traditional customs and beliefs with those of Islam and Protestantism. All films are from Niger, directed by Moustapha Alassane, and in French and Hausa with English subtitles, unless otherwise noted. 

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art, with Amélie Garin-Davet, French Embassy in New York. Special thanks to Mathieu Fournet.

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MoMA Presents Lynn Hershman Leeson’s Tania Libre

May 18, 2017–May 24, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Following its successful premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year, MoMA presents a weeklong theatrical run of Lynn Hershman Leeson’s Tania Libre (2017). Hershman Leeson’s documentary centers on the Cuban artist Tania Bruguera, who, in late 2014, in the weeks following Raul Castro’s and Barak Obama’s public commitments to renew diplomatic ties between Cuba and the US, was repeatedly questioned and placed under house arrest by the Castro government for staging a “treasonous” art performance in Havana’s Plaza of the Revolution. An international outpouring of support helped bring about Bruguera’s release, but other Cuban artists, dissidents, and journalists still remain in prison for subversive acts both real and imagined.

So much of Tania Bruguera’s art and activism has been a response to living under a repressive dictatorship. Tania Libre approaches this subject in a fascinating and novel way, following a therapy session in which Bruguera and Dr. Frank Ochberg, a pioneer in the study of post-traumatic stress, explore the psychological and physical effects of her interrogations and her family past. In Hershman Leeson—whose work is in MoMA’s collection and who was recently awarded the Golden Gate Persistence of Vision Award at the San Francisco Film Festival—Bruguera has found a portraitist who has dedicated more than four decades of radically innovative filmmaking and art to issues of identity, memory, surveillance, and censorship. On May 18 , Robyn Hullihan, Interim Executive Director of the Trust for Trauma Journalism, joins Hershman Leeson in introducing the opening-night screening of Tania Libre.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

Tania Libre. 2017. USA. Produced, directed, and edited by Lynn Hershman Leeson. With Tania Bruguera, Dr. Frank Ochberg. Courtesy Hotwire Productions, San Francisco. In Spanish, English; English subtitles. 73 min.

Thursday, May 18, 4:30 (introduced by Hershman Leeson and Robyn Hullihan, Trust for Trauma Journalism); Friday, May 19, 6:30; Saturday, May 20, 3:00; Sunday, May 21, 5:00; Monday, May 22, 4:00; Tuesday, May 23, 4:00; Wednesday, May 24, 6:30. T2

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Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends

May 21, 2017–September 17, 2017

Floor Four, Collection Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. View a video of the remarks.

In 1959, Robert Rauschenberg wrote, “Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made. (I try to act in that gap between the two.)” His work in this gap shaped artistic practice for decades to come.

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, the first 21st-century retrospective of the artist, presents work from six decades of his widely celebrated career in fresh ways, bringing together over 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Acclaimed artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas is collaborating on the exhibition’s design to foreground Rauschenberg’s work with dance and performance. MoMA’s presentation is structured as an “open monograph”—as other artists came into Rauschenberg’s creative life, they come into the exhibition, mapping the exchange of ideas. These figures include Trisha Brown, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Sari Dienes, Jasper Johns, Billy Klüver, Paul Taylor, David Tudor, Cy Twombly, Susan Weil, and many others.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition design was created in collaboration with the artist Charles Atlas.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Robert Rauschenberg.

The exhibition is supported at Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by Glenn and Eva Dubin, The Dana Foundation, Donald B. Marron, the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund, Monique M. Schoen Warshaw, Mrs. Ronnie F. Heyman, Helen and Charles Schwab, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III in honor of Jerry I. Speyer, and by Tiffany & Co.

Generous funding is provided by west elm.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio+ is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

 

 

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Projects 106: Martine Syms

May 27, 2017–July 16, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

Projects 106: Martine Syms, the first US solo museum exhibition by Martine Syms (b. 1988, Los Angeles), is an immersive installation including photographs and staged objects, and centering around a new feature-length film, Incense Sweaters & Ice.

Shot on location in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, Incense Sweaters & Ice follows three protagonists—Mrs. Queen Esther Bernetta White, Girl, and WB (“whiteboy”)—as they navigate dramas of surveillance, moving between watching, being watched, and remaining unseen. Accompanying the film is a suite of photographs sized to standard American movie posters and a metal mesh structure inspired by the geographies of the Great Migration.

Using video and performance, Syms examines representations of blackness and its relationship to narrative, vernacular, feminist thought, and radical traditions. Her artwork has been exhibited and screened extensively, including presentations at the Berlin Biennale, Manifesta 11, ICA London, The Hammer Museum, the New Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Initiated by MoMA in 1971 as a platform for new and experimental art, the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series, now presented at both The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1, provides a forum for the most urgent international voices in contemporary art. Projects 106: Martine Syms will be accompanied by an illustrated brochure. On the occasion of her exhibition, Syms will premiere a new lecture-performance as part of MoMA’s educational programming.

Projects 106: Martine Syms is organized by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to Brent Freaney at Special—Offer.

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A New Golden Age: Contemporary Philippine Cinema

June 01, 2017–June 25, 2017

MoMA presents a survey of Philippine cinema from around 2000 to the present, a period known as the Third Golden Age of Philippine cinema (following the first golden age, in the 1950s, and the second, from the 1970s to the early 1980s). The Philippines’ current wave of sustained creativity is unusual in its diversity of genre and style, audacious formal experimentation, and multiplicity of personal/social/political perspectives. Defying simple description, this dizzying array of distinct cinematic statements makes it an exceptionally unique, vibrant movement. From Lav Diaz’s minimalist tales rendered at epic lengths or Brillante Mendoza’s gritty realist portrayals of the margins of society, to Raya Martin’s experimentation with storytelling and form, Ditsi Carolino’s stark documentaries following the disenfranchised, and Erik Matti’s riveting thrillers, contemporary Filipino filmmakers are pushing cinematic boundaries and heating up the global film scene.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

Special thanks to Tess Rances and Vicky Belarmino of Cinemalaya, Gil Quito, Huei-Yin Chen, and intern Dalin Liu.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.

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Modern Matinees: Becoming Jennifer Jones

June 01, 2017–June 30, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Phylis Lee Isley was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1919 to parents who operated a traveling tent show. Isley’s education extended to Northwestern University and the American Academy for Dramatic Arts in New York City, where she met actor and future husband Robert Walker in 1939. Before Hollywood called, Isley and Walker returned to Tulsa to find steady work on radio programs. When the couple finally arrived in Hollywood, there was limited work, with stardom years away.

Ready to return to the theater, Isley auditioned at the New York offices of David O. Selznick for an out-of-town run of Rose Franken’s comedy Claudia. Insecure and inexperienced, she left the producer’s office distraught and unaware that Selznick—who had purchased the film rights to the play—had overheard her audition. In short order, he offered Isley a movie contract with his production company.

Ever the genius producer, Selznick took control of Isley’s nascent career, transforming her into “Jennifer Jones.” What Jones needed next was a prominent role in a high profile picture, and The Song of Bernadette (1943) could not have been a more ideal showcase for her metamorphosis. When Jones was cast as the peasant girl who has visions of the Virgin Mary, Selznick kept her away from the press, photographers, and, legend has it, the film’s premiere, in order to retain the illusion of her youth, chastity, and inscrutability. The newly minted Jennifer Jones walked away with that year’s Best Actress Oscar.

King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946) was another defining moment. Cast as a Native American/Caucasian woman who enters the lives of two brothers living on a remote Arizona ranch, Jones was uneasy about her character’s brazen sexuality—as were the censors. Nonetheless, the film went on to great success and earned Jones another of her five Academy Award nominations.

Becoming Jennifer Jones, our glimpse at the evolution of a great American actress, features a selection of films drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

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Inbox: Charles Atlas: The Illusion of Democracy

June 03, 2017–July 30, 2017

Exhibition Galleries, Second Floor

Throughout his forty-year career, the groundbreaking filmmaker and video artist Charles Atlas (American, born 1949) has collaborated with key figures from a range of creative disciplines, expanding the relationships between visual art, dance, music, theater, and television. In the late 1970s, together with the choreographer Merce Cunningham, Atlas pioneered “media-dance,” in which dance works were created and performed specifically for the camera. Atlas’s experimental narrative works from the 1980s integrate fiction and documentary with vibrant, stylized portraits of urban subcultures.

With his trilogy The Illusion of Democracy (2008–12), Atlas has abandoned the presence of human bodies in favor of numerical figures, animating a constantly expanding and contracting universe based on six digits. Casting 1 through 6 as the protagonists of these intricately choreographed video installations, Atlas pushes the limits of their “numberness” and evokes the pervasiveness of mathematical algorithms in our increasingly technologized society. In Plato’s Alley (2008), pulsing vertical and horizontal white lines take shape as a grid populated by the ensemble, and in Painting by Numbers (2011), a sea of digits swells and subsides over six acts that culminate in a climactic finale. In 143652 (2012), bars of color slowly yet relentlessly scan back and forth, at once erasing and transforming each figure. With its methodical abstraction and politically suggestive title, the trilogy is an introspective study in order and chaos.    

Charles Atlas has collaborated on the design of the exhibition Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends, currently on view in the fourth-floor Collection Galleries.

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Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12, 2017–October 01, 2017

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Thursday, June 8, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow in theater. Remarks will be livestreamed.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright that critically engages his multifaceted practice. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise nearly 400 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, and photographs, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Beyond the Frame: International Cinema by Magnum Photographers

June 24, 2017–July 01, 2017

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Magnum Photos, established in 1947 by Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and others as an independent cooperative of photographers, has produced some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. On the occasion of Magnum’s 70th anniversary, this program explores the agency’s rich relationship to cinema through the lens of travelogues and art films. The artists represented here used moving images as an extension or counterpart to their photographic work to develop personal and auteurist storytelling. Expanding on the agency’s transatlantic history, Beyond the Frame spotlights work centered on Africa, Latin America, the US, and Europe, from the 1960s to the present. Photojournalism, fiction, and avant-garde media are alternately at play in the diverse treatments of conflict, social issues, and everyday moments. With selections from the agency’s Magnum Eye (1991–93) and Magnum in Motion (2004–today) initiatives, the series also investigates the technological and artistic transition from narrative cinema to video, and finally, to contemporary creators operating in a hybrid and online media field. Born out of the Second World War, Magnum’s vibrant and independent platform is as essential as ever, allowing both the social role and transcendent artistic quality of images to flourish. For screening details, please visit moma.org/film.

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Magnum Photos and Susan Meiselas.

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MoMA Presents: Filipa César’s Spell Reel

June 27, 2017–July 03, 2017

“The first image is in black and white, upside down and projected into a black box that then becomes the frame. It now hovers like a time capsule near a man’s face. He looks down, listening in on a female guerrilla fighter and translating her words from Fulani. Within the capsule, money is counted and paid out as a new currency, the numbers of the years run backwards in the black box. A 16-mm film glides through the man’s hands and is transferred to a laptop screen frame by frame.

Filipa César’s Spell Reel is the result of a multifaceted research and digitisation project that she initiated in 2011 with Sana na N’Hada and Flora Gomes. Having studied film in Cuba, the two began using the camera to observe the fight for independence in Guinea-Bissau (1963–74). After the decaying visual and audio material was digitised in Berlin, the filmmakers travelled with a mobile cinema to the places where the footage had originally been shot and showed it to audiences for the first time, adding their own commentary. They then moved on, also returning to Berlin. Spell Reel watches an archive at work to produce the present” (2017 Berlin International Film Festival notes).

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

Spell Reel. 2017. Germany/Portugal/France/Guinea-Bissau. Directed by Filipa César. In Portuguese, Fula, Guinea-Bissau Creole, English, French; English subtitles. 96 min.
Tue, Jun 27, 7:00 T1; Wed, Jun 28, 7:00 T2; Thu, Jun 29, 7:00 T2; Fri, Jun 30, 7:30 T1; Sat, Jul 1, 7:00 T2; Sun, Jul 2, 2:00 T2; Mon, Jul 3, 4:00 T2

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Landmark 20th Season of Warm Up Begins July 1

July 01, 2017–September 02, 2017

MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series Warm Up celebrates its 20th season in 2017, with ten Saturdays presenting the best in live and electronic music—both local and global—across a range of genres. Warm Up 2017 begins on Saturday, July 1 and runs through Saturday, September 2, featuring a to-be-announced lineup of emerging and established artists as part of an ambitious and wide-ranging program.

Advance tickets are now available for all Warm Up 2017 dates. In celebration of Warm Up’s founding year, MoMA PS1 will offer a special “1998” ticket package providing access to all ten dates for only $98, available for a limited time only. Full ticketing information can be found within the full press release, in the press kit section of this page, or at mo.ma/warmup .

Over its 20 seasons, Warm Up has featured more than 750 artists, including pop artists Solange, Jamie XX, and Grimes, experimental musicians Arca, Black Dice, and Four Tet, and legendary DJs like DJ Premier, Ritchie Hawtin, and Derrick May. One of the longest-running music programs within a museum, Warm Up has a history of supporting seminal artists before they come to prominence and providing a platform for experimentation, unique collaborations, and new material. 

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Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps

August 19, 2017–October 09, 2017

Floor Three, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents Projects 107: Lone Wolf Recital Corps. The Lone Wolf Recital Corps, a multidisciplinary performance collective founded in 1986 by artist and musician Terry Adkins (American, 1953–2014), has an accumulative, rotating membership of collaborators in various musical and visual arts disciplines. During Adkins’s lifetime the Corps performed within and in conjunction with Adkins’s exhibitions; described by Adkins as “recitals,” these performances incorporated spoken word, live music, video projection, and costumed, choreographed movement. For Adkins, these “installation based experiences [issued] from an ongoing quest to reinsert the legacies of unheralded immortal figures to their rightful place within the panorama of history.” The Lone Wolf Recital Corps’ performances, which Adkins orchestrated with the collaborative improvisation of the Corps, have commemorated and celebrated such figures as John Brown, John Coltrane, Matthew Henson, Bessie Smith, and others.

Projects 107 will be the first exhibition to reunite the Lone Wolf Recital Corps since Adkins’s death. Conceived as a series of live performances by the reconstituted Corps, a changing group of artists will reprise selections from the group’s repertoire in an installation of Adkins’ sculptures. The exhibition will be supplemented by documentary video of earlier recitals, as well as performance props, costumes, and ephemera that trace the history of the Corps.

Projects 107 will bring together an intergenerational roster of artists and musicians, including Sanford Biggers, Don Byron, Jean-Paul Bourelly, Vincent Chancey, Arthur Flowers, Charles Gaines, Tyehimba Jess, Rashid Johnson, Demetrius Oliver, Cavassa Nickens, Clifford Owens, Kamau Patton, Dread Scott, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Robert Wisdom, Tukufu Zuberi, and others.

Organized by Akili Tommasino, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by the Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

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Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries, and Floor Two, Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,400 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 220 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available now in process at moma.org/bourgeoisprints, and ultimately documenting over 4,600 printed sheets in all.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Six, Exhibition Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the wide range of relationships between clothing and functionality, culture, aesthetics, politics, labor, economy, and technology in the exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern? In examining the ways in which wearable items are designed, manufactured, distributed, and used, the exhibition will present a selection of 111 examples of garments, footwear, and accessories that have had a strong impact on history and society in the 20th and 21st centuries, and continue to hold currency today. Comprised of examples as well-known, universal, and transformative as Levi’s 501 jeans and the bikini; as coveted as the Prada nylon backpack and the Hermès Birkin bag; and as culturally charged and historically rich as the Pashmina shawl, the dashiki, the kippah, and the keffiyeh, the exhibition will allow viewers to explore the influence of these items and their designers on Western culture over many decades.

Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition will present items along three tiers: archetype, stereotype, and prototype. In the installation, each item will be presented in the incarnation that made it significant in the last 100 (or so) years—the stereotype—accompanied by contextual material tracing back to its historical archetypes. In some cases, when innovation, opportunity, or necessity call for it, the item will be complemented by a new commission, or prototype. Thus, within the exhibition, designers, artists, scientists, engineers, and manufacturers will be invited to respond to some of these “indispensable items” with pioneering materials, approaches, and design revisions—extending this conversation into the near and distant future, and connecting the history of these garments with their present recombination and use.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at medium.com/items. The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at mo.ma/items. It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first U.S. retrospective of the work of Carolee Schneemann, spanning the artist’s prolific six-decade career. As one of the most influential artists of the second part of the twentieth century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into subjectivity, the social construction of the female body, and the cultural biases of art history have had significant influence on subsequent generations of artists. Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings of the 1950s and their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s, which integrated objects, mechanical elements, and modes of deconstruction. In the late 1960s Schneemann began positioning her own body within her work, performing the roles of “both image and image-maker.” As a central protagonist of the New York downtown avant-garde community, she explored hybrid artistic forms culminating in experimental theater events. By tracing the developments that led to Schneemann’s groundbreaking innovations in performance, film, and installation in the 1970s, as well as her increasingly spatialized multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, the exhibition embeds Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of painting.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting is organized by the Museum der Moderne Salzburg. The exhibition is curated by Sabine Breitwieser, Director, Museum der Moderne Salzburg; and consulting curator Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipolli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, New York; and organized at MoMA PS1 by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

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Cathy Wilkes

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition in New York focused on Glasgow-based artist Cathy Wilkes (b. 1966), in conjunction with the inaugural Lassnig Art Prize. Since the start of her career in the 1990s, Wilkes has created sculptural tableaux that engage with the rituals of life. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child-rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, in which Wilkes’s art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences to reach beyond herself while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking.

Wilkes is the first artist to receive the Lassnig Art Prize, a biennial award established by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in June 2016 to honor the achievements of mid-career artists. The Lassnig Art Prize was originally envisioned by pioneering Austrian artist Maria Lassnig before her death in 2014 at the age of 94, at height of her artistic powers. Having achieved recognition only later in life, she hoped to encourage the efforts of fellow career artists not yet familiar to the public. In 2014, MoMA PS1 presented Maria Lassnig’s first comprehensive American museum survey to universal acclaim.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

October 31, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Galleries

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the public’s imagination around the world. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition examining the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of downtown New York’s seminal alternative space in full. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.

 

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Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, Exhibition Galleries

This is the first U.S. survey to encompass Stephen Shore’s career in photography, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms. This major exhibition tracks the artist from his wunderkind beginnings—works made when he was just 14 years old were acquired by Edward Steichen, the Director of the Department of Photography at MoMA, and he had a solo exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art when he was 24 years old—through his continual, restless interrogation of image making. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works, along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Shore (American, b. 1947) has worked with many formats and mediums of photography, and this gathering of hundreds of his works will allow for a fuller understanding of the diversity of his output. The exhibition will feature historic and recent prints of black-and-white and color photographs, books, periodicals, films, portfolios, and digital works, including many that have never been published or exhibited, from his Conceptual projects, the American Surfaces and Uncommon Places series, his landscapes of the 1980s, commissions, and his recent explorations of Israel and Ukraine.

Shore’s first survey in New York in 10 years, this exhibition will both establish the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argue for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

Organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont & Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

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