Advance Schedule of Exhibitions for MoMA and MoMA PS1

Modern Mondays


The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2

Building upon the Museum’s eight-decade tradition of fostering cinematic innovation and experimentation, Modern Mondays invites artists working in the expanded field of film, video, performance, and sound to present their work in an intimate setting. A platform for both emerging artists and pioneering figures who have changed the way we think about the moving image, this series premieres new projects and rediscovers landmark works. Considering avant-garde narratives from the 21st century, the program also celebrates legacies of influential historical figures in a contemporary context. Each evening presents a unique opportunity for audiences to engage in dialogue with artists, along with curators and other guests.

Organized by the Department of Film and the Department of Media and Performance Art.

An Evening in Honor of Carolee Schneemann
Monday, March 5, 6:30 p.m., Theater 2

In conjunction with the MoMA PS1 retrospective Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting, this screening event and discussion in celebration of the artist’s work features special guests Melissa Ragona, Associate Professor of Contemporary Art and Critical Studies, School of Art, Carnegie Mellon University, on the role of sound in Schneemann’s work; Jenny Jaskey, Director, The Artist’s Institute, on the experimental film Plumb Line (1968–72); artist Amy Sillman, on Schneemann as painter; and Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipoli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, on the Lebanon Series (1981–99). A conversation and Q&A with Schneemann follows.

An Evening with Michael Holman
Monday, March 12, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

 Throughout the 1980s, artist and impresario Michael Holman thrived at the intersection of Manhattan’s No Wave and hip-hop scenes, producing pioneering work across music, performance, and television. In this live appearance, Holman revisits an early performance with his Gray bandmate, Wayne Clifford, in which Super8 and analog video loops were manipulated live, much like a DJ at a turntable, in the spirit of the band’s structural aesthetics. At MoMA, the new iteration of this loop performance, titled The Subjective Gaze, will consist of improvised moving images by Holman and sound by Nick Taylor, also of Gray, as a starting point in an expansive exploration of loops as a motif across scientific, spiritual, and artistic realms, in a hypnotizing study of the inherent structures underlying creativity.

This program accompanies Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983.

An Evening with Morgan Fisher
Monday, March 19, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

Point Counterpoint: Avant-Garde Film Scores, 1955–1973 culminates in a special Modern Mondays evening with the Los Angeles–based artist Morgan Fisher, who presents the North American premiere of his latest work, Another Movie (2017), in dialogue with Bruce Conner’s A MOVIE (1958). In his 50 years of making films, paintings, and installations, Fisher has explored the defining properties of each artistic medium in ways that are conceptually provocative, sensual, and even humorous. Reflecting on the relationship between sound and image, he will introduce his 1973 film Pictures and Sound Rushes as a prelude to considering the use of Ottorino Respighi’s symphonic tone poem Pines of Rome(1924) in Bruce Conner’s classic experimental film A MOVIE and in Fisher’s Another Movie, made some 60 years later. Fisher writes, “Conner turns the music to his purposes by putting images to it that are radically different from the four scenes Respighi said his music describes. Another Movieuses Respighi’s composition in its entirety, and it literalizes the third movement, which Conner omitted. This leaves the rest of Respighi’s music to be haunted by our memory of Conner’s indelible imagery—by turns pathetic, exotic, ridiculous, comical, catastrophic, grotesque, banal, glorious.” 

An Evening of Computer Films with Ken Knowlton
Monday, March 26, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

Ken Knowlton, formerly of the Computer Techniques Research Department at Bell Labs, was one of the critical computer researchers who pioneered computer-animated films. This evening features screenings and a conversation illustrating the history of computer-animated films and Knowlton’s involvement in their development.

This program accompanies Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989.

An Evening with Shannon Plumb
Monday, April 16, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

Shannon Plumb (American, 1970) becomes a literal one-woman show when she stars as all of the characters in her humorous, often caustic short films. She weaves her life as an artist, wife, and mother into these comedic works, morphing the ordinary into the astonishing by channeling the physicality of Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, and Lucille Ball. There is also a charming low-tech aesthetic in Plumb’s work, particularly with her preference for Super 8mm film and handmade costumes and props. But the payoff is sophisticated, shrewd, and wholly original, offering deft commentary on fashion, domesticity, body image, and the curious world of contemporary art.

In 2013 Plumb’s first feature film, Towheads, a self-assured visualization of modern-day motherly responsibility, premiered in MoMA’s New Directors/New Films festival. Plumb again played all of the key roles, defining her fictional characters using wigs, stuck-on mustaches, and the nobility of a woman pushed to the edge by two young sons and a distant husband. Many of these familial themes are persistent in Plumb’s work—a result of her constant intertwining of real life and art making.

Shannon Plumb joins us to screen several of her films—including Rattles and CherriesRollercoaster, and Olympics—and premiere a performance from her new work Chopped Liver.

An Evening with Candy Kugel
Monday, April 23, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2

In Candy Kugel’s new film I, Candy (2018), the process of deconstructing a childhood drawing triggers the artist’s reflections on a personal history with anti-Semitism, political activism, and life choices affected by luck and determination. Displaying an encyclopedic range of animation techniques with remarkable dexterity, I, Candy is a testament to Kugel’s pioneering 45-year career in the field. Animation artist and historian John Canemaker joins Kugel to discuss her legacy as a woman artist in the traditionally male business of independent animation in New York.

An Evening with Tamer El Said
Monday, April 30, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
The filmmaker joins us for a discussion of the occasion of MoMA’s weeklong run of his In the Last Days of the City.

MoMA Announces Major Gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

October 17, 2016

The Museum of Modern Art announced that it has received a major gift from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, which will add more than 100 works of modern art by major artists from Latin America to the Museum’s collection, and establish the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America. The Cisneros Institute will be dedicated to an expansive approach to the study and interpretation of modern and contemporary art from Latin America.

The gift includes 102 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, made between the 1940s and the 1990s by 37 artists working in Brazil, Venezuela, and the Río de la Plata region of Argentina and Uruguay, including Lygia Clark, Hélio Oiticica, Lygia Pape, Jesús Rafael Soto, Alejandro Otero, and Tomás Maldonado. They join 40 works previously given by Patricia and Gustavo Cisneros over the last 16 years; Mrs. Cisneros is a longtime MoMA Trustee and a member of several acquisitions and funding committees, including the Latin American and Caribbean Fund, of which she is chairman and founder.

The Cisneros Institute, to be located on MoMA’s Midtown Manhattan campus, will offer opportunities for curatorial research and travel, host visiting scholars and artists, convene an annual international conference, and produce research publications on art from Latin America. It is poised to become the preeminent research center in the field, building on MoMA’s history of collecting, exhibiting, and studying the art and artists of the region, dating back to 1931. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works by artists from Latin America.

The breadth of this gift is unprecedented, and the accompanying research initiative devoted to the study of the works and their integration into the overall narrative of modern art will greatly enrich MoMA’s collection and scholarly activities. As an integral program of The Museum of Modern Art, the Cisneros Institute represents a singular commitment to the region, and will foster intensive research on and engagement with the region’s art and artists.

For more information and a full list of works, please visit:


Constantin Brancusi Sculpture

July 22, 2018-February 2019

Floor Two, Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Poet Erza Pound spoke of artist Constantin Brancusi’s work as providing “the master keys to the world of form.” Over a career that spanned half a century, his innovations transformed sculpture as it had been known, and influenced generations of artists to come. After moving to Paris in 1904 from his native Romania, Brancusi affected the appearance of Romanian peasant—a long beard, work shirt and sandals—while embedding himself in avant-garde art circles. He soon began pushing modernist sculpture to the threshold of abstraction, developing a new, simplified vocabulary—graceful crescents, gleaming ovoids, and rough-hewn blocks—that often evoked rather than resembled the things named in their titles, such as Bird in Space and Fish. He placed the natural properties of his materials on display, carving directly into wood and stone, polishing metal to high reflectivity. The bases for his sculptures were often built of stacked elements—wood cubes, cylindrical slices, pyramidal blocks or cruciform stones—becoming an integral component of the work itself and hinting at the possibility of infinite rearrangement, an idea that would prove fertile for future decades.

Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, this concise presentation of Brancusi’s career features 11 of the artist’s sculptures, a selection of drawings and photographs, and a rich collection of archival material chronicling the artist’s production and his relationships with his sitters, patrons, and The Museum of Modern Art.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture


Young Architects Program 2018: Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine

June-September 2018

Hide & Seek by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, in collaboration with Clayton Binkley of ARUP, has been named the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program. Opening in June 2018, this year’s construction is a responsive, kinetic environment that features nine intersecting elements arrayed across the entirety of the MoMA PS1 courtyard. Drawn from among five finalists, Hide & Seek will serve as a temporary urban landscape for the 21st season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series, and remain on view through the summer.

Inspired by the crowd, the street, and the jostle of relationships found in the contemporary city, Hide & Seek enables surprising connections throughout the adjoining courtyards of MoMA PS1 and the surrounding streets. Each of the horizontal structures contains two inward-facing, gimbaled mirrors suspended from a frame. The mirrors move in the wind or with human touch, permitting dislocating views and unique spatial relationships across the space that foster unexpected interactions. As the vanishing points disappear into the depths of the mirrors, the illusion of space expands beyond the physical boundaries of the Museum and bends into new forms, creating visual connections within the courtyard and onto the streets outside. In reference to these unpredictable gestures, the upper registers of the steel structure will be filled with a cloud of mist and light, responding to the activity and life of Warm Up at night. Scriptive elements, including a runway and a large-scale hammock, invite visitors into performance and establish platforms for improvisation.

Bloomberg Philanthropies has supported the Young Architects Program since 2007. In 2016, MoMA PS1 and The Museum of Modern Art were thrilled to announce that this lead sponsorship had been extended for three years, enabling the Young Architects Program to thrive and excite audiences through summer 2018.

MoMA PS1 Building Images


Images of MoMA PS1’s building are located through Press Access.


Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures

February 1–15 and August 9–23, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The Museum of Modern Art announces Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures, a two-part series organized by MoMA in association with The Film Foundation and Paramount Pictures. The 30-film program begins on February 1 at 7:00 p.m. with Alfred Santell’s seldom-seen masterwork That Brennan Girl (1946), and continues through February 15; part two of the series will begin August 9 and run through August 23. Curated by Scorsese, the program celebrates a new beginning for the Republic library, which is currently being restored and returned to wide distribution by Paramount. 

“From the ’30s through the ’50s, the different studio logos at the head of every picture carried their own associations and expectations,” said Martin Scorsese. “And for me, the name Republic over the eagle on the mountain peak meant something special. Republic Pictures was what was known as a ‘poverty row’ studio, but what their pictures lacked in resources and prestige they made up for in inventiveness, surprise, and, in certain cases, true innovation. Among the many ‘B’ pictures produced at Republic in the studio’s heyday, there are so many titles that have been overlooked or forgotten; waiting for decades to be seen again. I’m truly excited that MoMA will be presenting 30 of these films, some in newly restored versions courtesy of Paramount Pictures and The Film Foundation. For two weeks this February and two weeks in August, you need to go to MoMA. I can promise you that you have some discoveries in store.” 

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.



The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries, Fifth Floor


Fifth floor

The Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries feature on the fifth floor roughly span the years 1880 to 1940. Within an overall chronological flow, galleries highlight individual stylistic movements, artists, and themes, including Post-Impressionism, Cubism, the work of Henri Matisse, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, and Surrealism, among other subjects. An ongoing program of periodic reinstallations allows the curators to present a wide range of artworks in various configurations, reflecting the view that there are countless ways to explore the history of modern art and the Museum’s rich collection. 

Browse selected works on view.



Touring and Off-Site Exhibitions


Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain
February 21–May 22, 2017

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (KNW), Düsseldorf, Germany
March 4–June 11, 2017

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from the Museum of Modern Art
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virgina
March 10–June 18, 2017

Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire
September 30–April 9, 2017

Robert Rauschenberg
Tate Modern, London, England
November 30, 2016–April 9, 2017

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California
November 4, 2017–March 25, 2018

Masterworks from MoMA
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
June 8–October 7, 2018


Young Architects Program International


With its international partnerships, Young Architects Program (YAP) offers selected young designers and architects across the globe the opportunity to create designs that promote diverse uses such as rest, play, and relaxation as well as hosting a series of live events such as shows, music, dance, exhibitions, and performances. In addition architects are encouraged to address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling, to create highly innovative projects that provide shade, seating, and water. To achieve these goals, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are currently partnering with the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI) in Rome, CONSTRUCTO in Chile, and Istanbul Modern in Turkey (on a biennial cycle).

In May 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA) in Seoul announced a new partnership that further expands the international YAP to South Korea. YAP Korea provides opportunities for emerging architects in South Korea to create temporary exterior installations for summer programming at the MMCA.

A dedicated YAP International website,, features the selected proposals and designs from the winner of YAP International. The website also includes an archive of past MoMA/MoMA PS1 YAP finalists and winning proposals, interviews with the curators, and installation videos.


Max Ernst: Beyond Painting

September 23, 2017–January 01, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany. 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went “beyond painting” to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II. Featuring approximately 100 works drawn from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition includes paintings that challenged material and compositional conventions; collages and overpaintings utilizing found printed reproductions; frottages (rubbings); illustrated books and collage novels; sculptures of painted stone and bronze; and prints made using a range of techniques. Several major, multipart projects represent key moments in Ernst’s long career, ranging from early Dada and Surrealist portfolios of the late 1910s and 1920s to his late masterpiece—a recent acquisition to MoMA’s collection—65 Maximiliana, ou l’exercice illégale de l’astronomie (1964). This illustrated book comprises 34 aquatints complemented by imaginative typographic designs and a secret hieroglyphic script of the artist’s own invention.

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, and Anne Umland, The Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, with Talia Kwartler, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.



Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait

September 24, 2017–January 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Tuesday, September 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,200 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Marron Atrium.

The artist’s creative process is the organizing principle behind the exhibition. Over the course of her career, Bourgeois constantly revisited the themes of her art, all of which emerged from emotions she struggled with for a lifetime. Also, she said there was no “rivalry” between the mediums in which she worked, noting that “they say the same thing in different ways.” Here, her prints and illustrated books will be seen in the context of related sculptures, drawings, and paintings, and within thematic groupings that explore motifs of architecture, the body, and nature, as well as investigations of abstraction and works made from old garments and household fabrics. In addition, the evolving states and variants of her prints will be emphasized in order to reveal Bourgeois’s creative thinking as it unfolded.  

Bringing together some 300 works, the exhibition celebrates the Museum’s archive of Bourgeois prints as well as the completion of the online catalogue raisonné, Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, available in process at, now documenting over 4,000 printed sheets.

Organized by Deborah Wye, Chief Curator Emerita, Prints and Illustrated Books, with Sewon Kang, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Kenneth C. Griffin Charitable Fund and by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Generous funding is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Special thanks to The Easton Foundation for its long-standing support of the Louise Bourgeois print archive at The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.




Items: Is Fashion Modern?

October 01, 2017–January 28, 2018

The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor

The Museum of Modern Art presents Items: Is Fashion Modern?, an investigation of 111 garments and accessories that have had a profound effect on the world over the last century, on view October 1, 2017, through January 28, 2018. Filling the entire sixth floor of the Museum, the exhibition explores fashion thematically, displaying 111 powerful and enduring manifestations of the ways in which fashion—a crucial field of design—touches everyone, everywhere. Like other forms of design, fashion exists within a complex system that involves politics and economics as much as it involves style, technology, and culture. The exhibition examines this complex system using each item as a lens. The 111 typologies are presented in the incarnation that made them significant in the last 100 years (the “stereotype”) alongside contextual materials—images or videos—that trace each item’s history and origins through to its archetypal form. Several concept items (the Little Black Dress, for instance) are represented by more than one example in order to fully underscore the breadth of the concept’s impact, bringing the actual total number of objects in the exhibition to around 350. About 30 items will be complemented by a new prototype—a commissioned or loaned piece inspired by advancements in technology, social dynamics, aesthetics, or political awareness.

The title of the exhibition reprises the question that architect and curator Bernard Rudofsky raised with his 1944 MoMA exhibition Are Clothes Modern?, which is the only other instance of MoMA fully addressing this field of design. In his exhibition, Rudofsky explored individual and collective relationships with mid-century clothing in the waning moments of WWII, when traditional attitudes still prevailed, women still poured their bodies into uncompromising silhouettes, and menswear still demanded superfluous pockets, buttons, cuffs, and collars. For the Items exhibition, Rudofsky’s question provides a springboard (and a foil) from which to consider the ways in which fashion is designed, manufactured, marketed, distributed, worn, and disposed of today.

An ongoing research archive reflecting on the exhibition’s broader processes is being published at The live stream from a two-day gathering of key designers, curators, critics, scholars, activists, and entrepreneurs to address the question “Is fashion modern?”, organized by MoMA in May 2016, can be found at It includes over 35 presentations by, among others, legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, model Hari Nef, activist DeRay Mckesson, designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, curator Harold Koda, and athlete Aimee Mullins.

Organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, and Michelle Millar Fisher, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.
Major support is provided by WGSN.
Sincere thanks to the members of Friends of Items, a special patron group generously supporting the Museum in celebration of the exhibition.
Paint provided by Farrow & Ball.
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Charles White—Leonardo da Vinci. Curated by David Hammons

October 07, 2017–January 03, 2018

Charles White (1918–1979) taught drawing in Los Angeles from the mid-1960s until the end of his life, and mentored a generation of students. Among them is David Hammons (American, born 1943), who studied with White early in his career. This exhibition, curated by Hammons, includes White’s monumental work Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)(1973), from The Museum of Modern Art’s collection, and a brush and ink drawing on blue prepared paper by the Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci, lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from the British Royal Collection. Created over 450 years apart, the two works share surprising formal connections and reveal a devotion to drawing by both artists, linking their lasting influence on future generations. Appearing a year prior to the forthcoming MoMA exhibition Charles White: A Retrospective, this project begins the Museum’s consideration of White’s work and his legacy.

Charles White–Leonardo da Vinci. Curated by David Hammons is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is made possible through The Agnes Gund Artist’s Choice Fund endowed by Iara Lee and George Gund III, Lulie and Gordon Gund, Ann and Graham Gund, and Sarah and Geoffrey Gund.


MoMA and the Fondation Louis Vuitton Announce the Co-Organized Exhibition Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris

October 11, 2017–March 05, 2018

Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, France

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Fondation Louis Vuitton announce the first comprehensive exhibition in France to present MoMA’s unparalleled collection: Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris, on view at Fondation Louis Vuitton from October 11, 2017, through March 5, 2018.

An integrated, cross-disciplinary selection of 200 works, drawn from all six of the Museum’s curatorial departments and reflecting the history of the institution and its collecting, will fill the entirety of the Fondation’s Frank Gehry–designed building. Curated jointly by the two institutions, the display brings together paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, films, media works, performances, and architecture and design objects, tracing the evolution and multifaceted scope of MoMA’s collection. The exhibition was conceived in relation to the architecture and interior spaces of the Fondation Louis Vuitton building, allowing a compelling historical narrative across its four floors.

Etre moderne features masterworks by artists including Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Paul Cézanne, Marcel Duchamp, Walker Evans, Jasper Johns, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Gustav Klimt, Yayoi Kusama, René Magritte, Pablo Picasso, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Yvonne Rainer, Frank Stella, and Paul Signac. A selection of rarely shown documentary material from MoMA’s Archives will be incorporated in the galleries, tracing the history of the Museum and contextualizing the works.

Etre moderne: Le MoMA à Paris is co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Fondation Louis Vuitton, under the direction of Glenn Lowry (Director, The Museum of Modern Art) and Suzanne Pagé (Artistic Director, Fondation Louis Vuitton). The exhibition is curated by Quentin Bajac (The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, MoMA), assisted by Katerina Stathopoulou (Assistant Curator, MoMA), with Olivier Michelon (Curator, Fondation Louis Vuitton). The archival section is organized by Michelle Elligott (Chief of Archives, MoMA).


Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018


MoMA PS1 will present the first comprehensive retrospective of the work of Carolee Schneemann (American, b. 1939) in the United States, bringing together over 300 works spanning her prolific six-decade career. As one of the most groundbreaking artists of the second half of the twentieth century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into the social construction of the female body and the sexual and cultural biases implicit in traditional art historical narratives have had an indelible impact on subsequent generations of artists.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings from the 1950s, charting their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s—which integrated found objects, mechanical elements, and painterly interventions. A central protagonist of New York City’s downtown avant-garde community, Schneemann explored hybrid art forms that culminated in experimental theater events. She was a co-founder of the innovative Judson Dance Theater and the first visual artist to choreograph for the ensemble. During this period, Schneemann began to position her own body in her work with the intent of performing the roles of “both image-maker and image.” Responding to representations of sexuality made predominantly from the perspective of male artists, Schneemann’s provocative pieces foregrounded her body in ways that challenged prevailing attitudes about female sexuality. In parallel, Schneemann’s outrage over the atrocities of the Vietnam War are starkly reflected in several of her works from the mid-1960s.

The exhibition grounds Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of her lifelong commitment to painting and action, tracing the early developments that would lead to her iconic performances and films from the 1960s and 1970s, through to her multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s exploring feminist iconography, intimacy, and personal loss, as well as political disasters, captivity, and the destruction of war.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting is organized by the Museum der Moderne Salzburg. The exhibition is curated by Sabine Breitwieser, Director, Museum der Moderne Salzburg; and consulting curator Branden W. Joseph, Frank Gallipolli Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Columbia University, New York; and organized at MoMA PS1 by Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Assistant Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, The Museum of Modern Art; with Oliver Shultz, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

Major support is provided by Lonti Ebers and The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.
Additional support is provided by the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.


Cathy Wilkes

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018


MoMA PS1 presents the first monographic exhibition of Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. On view from October 22, 2017 through March 11, 2018, the exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016.

Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures, and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking.

Organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.


Naeem Mohaiemen: There Is No Last Man

October 22, 2017–March 11, 2018

In his films, installations, and essays, Naeem Mohaiemen (b. London, 1969) researches memories of leftist political utopias, and the contemporary legacies of decolonization. Bringing together two distinct works, Naeem Mohaiemen: There Is No Last Man imagines a relationship between two lonely narrators, each trapped at the edge of history.

Tripoli Cancelled (2017), a fiction film loosely inspired by the artist’s father, follows the daily rituals of a man stranded in an abandoned airport. The film follows him through his daily routine of walking, smoking, writing letters to his wife, staging scenes with mannequins in flight attendant uniforms, and reading from the dark British children’s book Watership Down (1972). Mohaiemen shot the film in Ellinikon Airport in Athens, Greece, loosely inspired by his father’s experience of being stuck in this same airport for nine days in 1977 after losing his passport. Designed by architect Eero Saarinen in the 1960s, Ellinikon was abandoned in 2001 and was recently used to house refugees entering Greece, and then proposed as a site for luxury real estate development during European Union negotiations over Greek debt.

Volume Eleven (flaw in the algorithm of cosmopolitanism) (2016) comprises diptychs that investigate six problematic essays by Mohaiemen’s great uncle, the Bengali writer Syed Mujtaba Ali, who mistakenly embraced German military might as an antidote to British colonial rule in India. When the artist began translating Ali’s short stories of the late 1930s, he was dismayed to discover several writings in which Ali expressed a hope that Nazi Germany would defeat Britain and liberate India from colonial rule. Volume Elevenexplores the intellectual underpinnings of this short-lived fascination with German political thought among a wide range of Indian intellectuals of the period.

The exhibition title responds to Francis Fukuyama’s book The End of History and the Last Man (1992), which proposed that Western liberal democracy and capitalism would be the final shared fate of humanity. Mohaiemen’s work suggests that there will be no “last man” or “end of history” in an era marked by the growing prominence of non-Western histories that acknowledge multiple viewpoints and perspectives on the development of modernity. The artist often works through the literature generated in the aftermath of political defeats, bringing the traumas of history into conversation with his own family narratives. Here, two men struggle at the margins of larger events, telling themselves fables and fictions to keep living.

Naeem Mohaiemen: There Is No Last Man is organized by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1, with Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator.


You Are Now One of Us: Film at Club 57

October 29, 2017–February 14, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

In conjunction with the Club 57 gallery exhibition, this series explores the films that took a central role in defining the club’s programming. Selected from actual Club 57 screening schedules, it spans horror, science fiction, musicals, psychedelia, 1960s mod, European art cinema, TV programs, artist’s cinema, and more. At the club, this unruly mix of genres took on new meaning through collective experience and active spectatorship against the backdrop of post-punk New York.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with John “Lypsinka” Epperson, guest curator.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.


Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

October 31, 2017–April 08, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, October 31, with remarks to follow.

Remarks were livestreamed.

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the public’s imagination around the world. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition examining the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of downtown New York’s seminal alternative space in full. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Club 57 is accompanied by three film series: You Are Now One Of Us: Film at Club 57, co-organized with guest curator and defining Club 57 artist John “Lypsinka” Epperson (October 29, 2017–February 2018); New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive (December 1, 2017–April 2018), and This Is Now: Film and Video After Punk 1978–1985 (March 15, 2018–March 25,2018), presented in spring 2018 in partnership with LUX and British Film Institute.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.


The Long Run

November 11, 2017–November 04, 2018

Floor Four, The David Geffen Galleries

Innovation in art is often characterized as a singular event—a bolt of lightning that strikes once and forever changes what follows.  “The Long Run” provides an alternate view: by chronicling the continued experimentation of artists long after their breakthrough moments, it suggests that invention results from sustained critical thinking, persistent observation, and countless hours in the studio.  Each work in this presentation exemplifies an artist’s distinct evolution.  For some, this results from continually testing the boundaries of a given medium, for others it reflects the pressures of social, economic, and political circumstances.  Often, it is a combination of both.  “The Long Run” includes monographic galleries and rooms that bring together artists broad ranging in background and approach, drawn from MoMA’s collection.  All the artists in this presentation are united by a ceaseless desire to make meaningful work, year after year, across decades.   They include Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Joan Jonas, Helen Levitt, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O’Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, Frank Stella, and many others.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

Leadership support for the exhibition is provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation.

Major support is provided by Denise Littlefield Sobel.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.


Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989

November 13, 2017–April 08, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Drawn primarily from MoMA’s collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies’ capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment.

Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, and Apple Computer. The exhibition combines artworks, design objects, and architectural proposals to trace how computers transformed aesthetics and hierarchies, revealing how these thinking machines reshaped art making, working life, and social connections.

Organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Giampaolo Bianconi, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.


Stephen Shore

November 19, 2017–May 28, 2018

Floor Three, The Robert B. Menschel Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents the most comprehensive exhibition ever organized of photographer Stephen Shore’s work, on view from November 19, 2017, until May 28, 2018. The exhibition tracks the artist’s work chronologically, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current work with digital platforms. Stephen Shore establishes the artist’s full oeuvre in the context of his time—from his days at Andy Warhol’s Factory through the rise of American color photography and the transition to large-scale digital photography—and argues for his singular vision and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities. The exhibition will include hundreds of photographic works along with additional materials including books, ephemera, and objects.

Born in 1947, Shore spearheaded the New Color Photography movement in the United States in the 1970s, and became a major catalyst in the renewal of documentary photography in the late 1990s, both in the US and Europe, blending the tradition of American photographers such as Walker Evans with influences from various artistic movements, including Pop, Conceptualism, and even Photo-Realism. Shore’s images seem to achieve perfect neutrality, in both subject matter and approach. His approach cannot be reduced to a style but is best summed up with a few principles from which he has seldom deviated: the search for maximum clarity, the absence of retouching and reframing, and respect for natural light. Above all, he exercises discipline, limiting his shots as much as possible—one shot of a subject, and very little editing afterward.

Stephen Shore is organized by Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, with Kristen Gaylord, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, MoMA.

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for Stephen Shore is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund, an anonymous donor, The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by David Dechman and Michel Mercure.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

Support for the publication is provided by the Jo Carole Lauder Publications Fund of The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.



New York Film and Video: No Wave–Transgressive

December 01, 2017–April 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Presented as part of the Club 57 exhibition, this survey celebrates film and video created during New York’s post-punk period, including landmark examples of No Wave, Cinema of Transgression, and independent films that grew out of the East Village scene and were first exhibited in area venues like Club 57, New Cinema, Millennium, and others. The richly diverse artists working during the heyday of the downtown scene left a vibrant legacy of Super8 filmmaking; collaborative works that have resonance as neighborhood home movies; and cinema that engages auteurist and genre cinema traditions, or upends them completely. Many of the filmmakers will be present, and we will premiere a number of recent MoMA preservations of little-seen and iconic titles alike.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.


To Save and Project: The 15th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation

January 18, 2018–February 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The 15th edition of MoMA’s annual international festival of newly preserved films, To Save and Project, features a diverse selection of titles from Asia, Europe, Africa, Latin America, Australia, and the US, in formats ranging from 16mm to Cinerama.

A strong selection of films by women includes narrative features by two major artists, Chantal Akerman and Ida Lupino, as well as avant-garde work by Sheila Paige, Peggy Ahwesh, Barbara Hammer, and Maria Lassnig, and a selection of the travelogues shot in the 1920s and ’30s by the international adventurer Aloha Wanderwell.

Two classics of African cinema, Gaston Kaboré’s Wend Kuuni(1982) and Med Hondo’s Soleil Ô (1970), join work from the Philippines, Hong Kong, and Mexico to illustrate the global reach of current preservation practice, while the classical Hollywood cinema is represented by three restorations from MoMA: Douglas Fairbanks’s The Three Musketeers (1921) and two rediscoveries from William K. Howard, Transatlantic (1931) and Sherlock Holmes (1932).

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Special thanks to Cindi Rowell and Brittany Shaw.

Electronic subtitling provided by Sub-Ti Ltd.

This exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.


Winter/Spring 2018 VW Sunday Sessions

January 28, 2018–April 15, 2018

The sixth season of MoMA PS1’s VW Sunday Sessions continues on January 28, with twelve more weekly programs that address a range of current social and political issues, explore the life and legacy of alternative spaces, and foster cross-disciplinary collaboration. Encompassing performance, music, dance, conversation, and film, VW Sunday Sessions underscores how live art forms encourage engagement with our contemporary world. Featuring a wide range of artists, curators, collectives, and activist groups, the full schedule of programs follows below.


Maria Lassnig: New York Films 1970–1980

February 01, 2018–June 18, 2018


MoMA PS1 presents the world premiere of a series of experimental films the artist Maria Lassnig made in New York City in the 1970s. This presentation focuses on a selection of newly discovered and restored films that examine ways of looking and seeing bound up in bodily sensation. Newly restored by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in close collaboration with the Austrian Film Museum, these films incorporate animation, sound, and poetic voiceovers that encourage entry into the artist’s internal world. The restoration was carried out in close collaboration with the Austrian Film Museum under the directorships of Alexander Horwath and Michael Loebenstein, who were indispensable to the restoration of these documents that attest to core principles of Lassnig’s thinking and practice across canvas and celluloid.

Maria Lassnig: New York Films 1970–1980 highlights both finished films and film fragments, all produced using 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8, comprised of live-action footage, animated drawings, animated paper cut-outs, and documentary footage of the artist’s studio and her surroundings in New York. These newly surfaced films enrich and complicate our understandings of Lassnig’s approach to figuration and self-portraiture, as well as other key themes that she investigated throughout her career, including the social roles assigned to women, the tension between public engagement and private seclusion, and questions of technological advancement, especially of imaging technologies and shifts in the way images circulate.

To kick off this exhibition, a world premiere screening accompanied by a comprehensive presentation detailing the restoration process will take place on January 29 at The Museum of Modern Art as part of the museum’s Modern Mondays series as well as To Save and Project: The 15th MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation.

Organized by Jocelyn Miller, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.


Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000)

February 03, 2018–March 11, 2018

Floor two, Collection Galleries

The Museum of Modern Art presents a major performance installation by Tania Bruguera (Cuban, born 1968), Untitled (Havana, 2000), for the first time since acquiring it in 2015, from February 3 through March 11, 2018. Initially conceived for the 7th Havana Biennial, the work was first presented in the Cabaña Fortress, a military bunker used as a jail for prisoners of conscience during the Cuban Revolution. The Fortress was used from colonial times through the early years of the Revolution as a site where the counter-revolutionary opposition was submitted to torture and execution by firing squad. Combining milled sugarcane, video footage of Fidel Castro, and live performance presented in near-total darkness, the work suggests the contradictions of life following the Cuban Revolution. The work, which was on view for mere hours before being shut down by the Cuban government in 2000, signifies Bruguera’s complex relationship to authority.

Tania Bruguera: Untitled (Havana, 2000) is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, and performances produced by Lizzie Gorfaine, Performance Producer, with Kate Scherer, Assistant Performance Coordinator.

The exhibition is made possible by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.
Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund.
Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.
Special thanks to Air Water & Earth and to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.

Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil

February 11, 2018–June 03, 2018

Floor Two, The Paul J. Sachs Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, February 6, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure for the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features nearly 120 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila―as she is affectionately known in Brazil―studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her “military service in Cubism,” ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette. The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Brazil, through Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, charting her involvement with an increasingly international artistic community, and her role in the emergence of modernism in Brazil; in 1928, Tarsila painted Abaporu, which quickly spawned the Anthropophagous Manifesto, and became the banner for this transformative artistic movement that sought to digest external influences and produce an art for and of Brazil itself.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, former Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Stephanie D’Alessandro, former Gary C. and Frances Comer Curator of International Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago; with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Major support for the New York presentation is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Modern Women’s Fund, and by the Vicky and Joseph Safra Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Clarice Oliveira Tavares, Yvonne Dadoo Ader, and by the Consulate General of Brazil in New York.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.



Doc Fortnight 2018: MoMA’s International Festival of Nonfiction Film and Media

February 15, 2018–February 26, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Doc Fortnight, MoMA’s annual international festival of nonfiction film, returns for its 17th year with 12 days of innovative approaches to documentary filmmaking from February 15-26. Featuring a diverse assortment of feature and short films from across the globe, the festival continues to highlight the vibrant and varied styles of independent filmmakers—both emerging and established—around the world.

Recognizing the recent passing of award-winning filmmaker, Jonathan Demme, this year’s festival includes a retrospective of several documentaries made during his prolific career. At a time of escalating sociopolitical tension, Doc Fortnight continues its history of showcasing nonfiction film that challenges our perceptions of the changing world and the traditional model of documentary cinema.

Organized by Kathy Brew, Guest Curator, with Gianna Collier-Pitts

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Film Fund.


MoMA Presents: Joshua Bonnetta and J. P. Sniadecki’s El Mar La Mar

February 23, 2018–March 01, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

What is seen tells the stories of what is unseen. Filmed over two years in the treacherous Sonoran Desert near the US-Mexico border, El Mar La Mar enlightens the current debates on border security and immigration, but in unexpected ways.

Grainy 16mm-turned-digital images of the endless horizon, sun-scorched land, and bare sky introduce a forbidding terrain. Shots of empty water bottles, pocket-sized religious artifacts, and broken shoes bear witness to the hardship thousands have endured, while voiceovers recount tales of desperation, sightings of death, and encounters with mysterious creatures. Intricate sonic elements bring the desert to life, but not without eliciting fear. Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab alumnus J. P. Sniadecki and multimedia artist Joshua Bonnetta take a truly experimental approach to documentary in this meditative, complex work of filmic poetry.

Organized by La Frances Hui, Associate Curator, Department of Film.

El Mar La Mar. 2017. USA. Directed by Joshua Bonnetta, J. P. Sniadecki. 16mm converted to DCP. English, Spanish; English subtitles. 94 min.

Friday, February 23, 7:00 p.m, includes discussion with the filmmakers, Theater 2 
Saturday, February 24, 4:00 p.m., includes discussion with the filmmakers, Theater 2
Sunday, February 25, 5:00 p.m., Theater 2
Monday, February 26, 4:00 p.m., Theater 2
Tuesday, February 27, 6:30 p.m., Education and Research Building, The Celeste Bartos Theater 3
Wednesday, February 28, 6:30 p.m., Theater 2
Thursday, March 1, 7:00 p.m., Theater 1


Modern Matinees: Delmer Daves and H. C. Potter in Resonance

March 01, 2018–April 27, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Delmer Daves and H. C. Potter were contemporaries and friends who, while not necessarily household names, were essential contract directors during the Golden Age of the Hollywood studio system. This brief survey, which includes prints from MoMA’s collection, captures both in top form.

Delmer Daves (1904–1977) studied law at Stanford University but became intrigued by the industry emerging in his backyard and ended up working as a prop boy on Westerns while completing his degree. In 1929 his script So This Is College was produced for MGM, and he went on to write screenplays for The Petrified Forest (1936) and Love Affair (1939), among others. In 1943 Daves made his directorial debut with Destination Tokyo, starring Cary Grant, though he truly found his niche when he returned to Westerns. In films like Broken Arrow (1950) and 3:10 to Yuma(1957), introspective, conflicted men must confront both nature and human violence. Late in his career, in 1963, Daves adapted Earl Hamner, Jr.’s novel Spencer’s Mountain, a starring vehicle for Henry Fonda and Maureen O’Hara that went on to become the basis for the popular television series The Waltons.

Henry Codman “Hank” Potter (1904–1977), born into a prominent New York family, graduated from Yale University and, in 1927, cofounded the Hampton Players, one America’s first summer theater groups. He soon advanced to Broadway, where his success eventually led to his first Hollywood feature, Beloved Enemy (1936), a romantic drama obsessed by the seemingly eternal British/Irish divide. However, Potter’s true strength was the comedy film—the more hysteria and doubletalk between characters, the better! Best known for quick-witted classics such as Hellzapoppin’ (1941), Mr. Lucky (1943), and the iconic Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948), Potter hit his directorial stride inveigling comical and sometimes tart performances from his actors (including Cary Grant, who shines as both Mr. Blandings and Mr. Lucky). In 1949, while under contract at RKO during Howard Hughes’s ownership of the studio, Potter ran into some difficulties with the eccentric Texan. Just days before photography commenced on a film tentatively titled The High Frontier, which would involve use of the United States Air Force’s massive B-36, Potter received a telegram saying the production was cancelled. There was no further communication from Hughes, and Potter’s notable career lost momentum.

Organized by Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film.


El Indio: The Films of Emilio Fernández

March 01, 2018–March 13, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The son of a Kickapoo Indian and a revolutionary general, Emilio Fernández—known to generations of Mexican filmgoers as “El Indio”—was the most celebrated filmmaker to emerge from the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. Influenced equally by Hollywood narrative and Soviet montage techniques, Fernández brought an image of an eternal, elemental Mexico to the international festival circuit of the 1940s and ’50s, winning awards in Cannes (María Candelaria), Venice (La perla), and Karolvy Vary (Río Escondido). With a creative team that regularly included cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa, writer Mauricio Magdaleno, and stars such as Dolores del Río, Pedro Armendáriz, María Félix, Arturo de Córdova, and Ninón Sevilla, Fernández created an authentic Latino voice that continues to enchant and amaze, now returned to its full force and timbre in magnificent new restorations from the Mexican archives.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Curator, Department of Film. Presented with the generous assistance of the Morelia International Film Festival, Cineteca Nacional de Mexico, Filmoteca de la UNAM, and Televisa Foundation. Special thanks to Daniela Michel and Chloë Roddick (Morelia International Film Festival) and Mauricio Maillé (Televisa Foundation).

Electronic subtitling provided by Sub-Ti Ltd.


Cuban Cinema under Censorship

March 09, 2018–March 11, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

This exhibition aims to review more than half a century of censorship in Cuban cinema, which can be traced to a kind of foundational moment: Orlando Jiménez Leal and Sabá Cabrera Infante’s PM (1961). This short film’s censorship by the Institute of Cuban Film was among the first delimitations of cultural policy under the nascent socialist regime led by Fidel Castro. Likewise, Conducta Impropia (Improper Conduct) (1983, Orlando Jiménez Leal, Néstor Almendros), though not produced in Cuba, was also banned in the country: the film denounced the systematic persecution and repression of the gay community and an intelligentsia who “maladjusted” to the requirements put in place by the Cuban authorities. In the ensuing decades censorship by the Instituto Cubano de Arte e Industria Cinematográficos (Cuban Institute of Cinematographic Art and Industry), or ICAIC, was usually “aired out” within the institution. But in the new century, with the emergence of cinema that was independent from institutions and the editorial criteria of the state, the list of censored or repressed works increased rapidly. Manuel Zayas’s Odd People Out (2004) complements the investigation begun by Improper Conductfrom a documentary angle, while Carlos Lechuga’s Santa & Andrés (2016) does the same through fiction. The latter film was the subject of a public state veto, a rarity among recent productions. Also featured in this series, Eliécer Jiménez’s Persona (2014), Miguel Coyula’s Nadie (Nobody) (2016), Juan Carlos Cremata’s Crematorio (Crematorium) (2013), Ricardo Figueredo and Anthony Bubaire’s Despertar (Awakening) (2011), and Marcelo Martin’s El tren de la linea norte (The Train on the Northern Railway) (2015) represent just some of the films—mostly documentaries—that have been subject to state vetoes and suffered from political suppression in the last decade.

Presented in conjunction with Tania Burguera’s installation Untitled (Havana, 2000).

Organized by Dean Luis Reyes, Guest Curator.


2018 VW Sunday Sessions Commission

March 11, 2018–March 11, 2018

For the 2018 VW Sunday Sessions commission, artist and performer Colin Self presents Siblings, the sixth and final part of The Elation Series, a sci-fi opera encompassing performance, music, sculpture, and video that he has been developing since 2011. The performance will be presented at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on March 11, 2018, closing day of MoMA PS1’s winter exhibitions.

A playful examination of Donna J. Haraway’s recent book Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, the performance offers new ways of re-configuring our relationship to the earth and its inhabitants in the wake of ecological devastation, foregrounding the necessity of new narrative structures to realize a better world. Structured like a game, Siblings functions as a participatory performance, assigning the audience roles and responsibilities. Divided into analysts, activists, archivists, and spies, these groups expand their subjective encounters of text, song, and dance into ruptures of narrative analysis.


Point Counterpoint: Avant-Garde Film Scores, 1955–1973

March 14, 2018–March 22, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

As part of Carnegie Hall’s citywide festival The ’60s: The Years that Changed America, The Museum of Modern Art presents a film series celebrating the use of avant-garde and modern classical music in international cinema between 1955 and 1973. A follow-up to MoMA’s 2008 exhibition Jazz Score, the series features the film work of Pierre Boulez, Daphne Oram, Yoko Ono, Arvo Pärt, Steve Reich, Tôru Takemitsu, Edgard Varèse, and other revolutionary composers of the 20th century. Avant-Garde Film Scoresculminates on March 19 with a special Modern Mondays evening with the artist Morgan Fisher, who premieres his latest film, Another Movie (2018), in dialogue with Bruce Conner’s A Movie (1958) and with Ottorino Respighi’s 1924 orchestral tone poem Pines of Rome, the music used in the scores of both.

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, and Maddi Lopez de Arkaute, Intern, Department of Film. Special thanks to Olivia Priedite.


This Is Now: Film and Video After Punk

March 15, 2018–March 25, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

This touring program from LUX and British Film Institute explores the nexus of Britain’s post-punk and avant-garde film and video scenes through a wealth of newly preserved work from 1979 to 1985. The New York premiere of This Is Us is presented in conjunction with Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983, providing an evocative counterpoint to Club 57’s look back at the same period in New York City. Newly available as a mode of expression and experimentation for artists, filmmakers, and club kids alike, inexpensive and direct technologies, from Super8 to VHS, allowed them to explore such themes as the intertwining of performance and identity on screen and the subversion of mainstream Thatcherite society and its image systems. From John Maybury’s lyrical tableau of Siouxsie Sioux and assemblages from the Scratch Video collective to early work by Isaac Julien and Cerith Wyn Evans, this energetic mix represents a pioneering period from an alternative scene that still resonates three decades later.

Presented in in partnership with LUX and British Film Institute. Organized at MoMA by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator and Ron Magliozzi, Curator, Department of Film.


Irresistible Forces, Immovable Objects: The Films of Amir Naderi

March 16, 2018–March 27, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Amir Naderi’s journey as a filmmaker began in Iran, where he was born in the southern port city of Abadan in 1946. Orphaned as a child, he spent his formative years on the street (an existence dramatized in his 1984 feature The Runner). A job working in a movie theater led him to discover his true homeland—the cinema—and Naderi has remained a citizen of that refined world ever since, pursuing his passion for filmmaking around the globe with no regard for physical borders or language barriers.
Naderi made his first films in the 1970s at Iran’s famed Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults, working alongside Abbas Kiarostami. After The Runner and Water, Wind, Dust found critical favor on the international film festival circuit, Naderi relocated to New York. Themes of isolation and alienation, already present in his work, were amplified by his encounter with the city, and with Manhattan by Numbers (1993) Naderi began an extraordinary series of films—including A, B, C…Manhattan(1997), Marathon (2002), and Sound Barrier (2005)—in which characters map their desire for emotional connection onto the coldly rational structures of New York’s street grid and transportation systems.
With Vegas: Based on a True Story (2008) Naderi again expanded his territory, moving first to the American West, then to Japan (for the 2011 Cut), and back in time to medieval Italy for his most recent film, Monte (2016), the story of a poor farmer who picks a quarrel with no less a force than geography itself.
“Naderi’s cinema is honest like John Ford’s, poetic like Robert Flaherty’s, masculine like Howard Hawks’, mysterious as Alfred Hitchcock’s, powerful as Orson Welles’, humanistic like Jean Renoir’s, bitter and realistic like Vittorio De Sica’s and sometimes as dark and surrealistic as Luis Buñuel’s.” — Bahman Maghsoudlou

Being: New Photography 2018

March 18, 2018–August 19, 2018

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 13, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art presents Being: New Photography 2018, the latest presentation in MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series. Since its inception in 1985, New Photography has introduced more than 100 artists from around the globe, and it is a key component of the Museum’s contemporary program. Every two years, New Photography presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human. On view from March 18 through August 19, 2018, the exhibition includes over 80 new and recent works by 17 artists from eight countries. While at various stages in their careers, all are presenting their work at the Museum for the first time.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology.

The artists included are:

Sofia Borges (Brazilian, born 1984)
Matthew Connors (American, born 1976)
Sam Contis (American, born 1982)
Shilpa Gupta (Indian, born 1976)
Adelita Husni-Bey (Italian, born 1985)
Yazan Khalili (Palestinian, born Syria, 1981)
Harold Mendez (American, born 1977)
Aïda Muluneh (Ethiopian, born 1974)
Hương Ngô and Hồng-Ân Trương (American, born Hong Kong, 1979; American, born 1976)
B. Ingrid Olson (American, born 1987)
Joanna Piotrowska (Polish, born 1985)
Em Rooney (American, born 1983)
Paul Mpagi Sepuya (American, born 1982)
Andrzej Steinbach (German, born Poland, 1983)
Stephanie Syjuco (American, born Philippines, 1974)
Carmen Winant (American, born 1983)

Being: New Photography 2018 is organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund , David Dechman and Michel Mercure, and The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by Courtney Finch Taylor and by James G. Niven.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.


Come Together: Music Festival and Label Market

March 24, 2018–March 24, 2018

MoMA PS1 and iconic record shop Other Music have teamed up to present the second annual Come Together: Music Festival and Label Market on Saturday, March 24, offering live performances, films, workshops, and panels that celebrate the interactive ecosystem of local and international music communities, along with a label market featuring over 75 participants. Part of MoMA PS1’s VW Sunday Sessions, Come Together reasserts the central and essential role that communities play in both the creation and consumption of new sounds, recasting the fading record store experience for the current moment. This year features extended festival programming, with daytime programming and the label market from 12:00 through 6:00 p.m., and an expanded slate of performances from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.


New Directors/New Films 2018

March 28, 2018–April 08, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

Now in its 47th year, the renowned New Directors/New Films festival, presented jointly by The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, introduces New York audiences to the work of emerging or not-yet-established filmmakers from around the world. The festival takes place at the Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center and at The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters at MoMA.

Organized by a selection committee comprising Josh Siegel, Curator; La Frances Hui, Associate Curator; Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator and Brittany Shaw, Department Assistant, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Dennis Lim, Director of Programming; Florenze Almozini, Associate Director of Programming; Dan Sullivan, Assistant Programmer, and Tyler Wilson, Programming Coordinator, the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

New Directors/New Films is presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art and is supported by the Annual Film Fund of The Museum of Modern Art, Film Society’s New Wave, The New York Times, American Airlines, The Village Voice, Shutterstock, and Hudson Hotel. 

Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016

March 31, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Six, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, and Floor Two, The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

Press Preview: Tuesday, March 27, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

From March 27 to July 22, 2018, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the work of Adrian Piper (American, born 1948), the result of four-year collaboration between Piper, The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, and The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Comprising over 290 works gathered from public and private collections around the world, this inclusive retrospective, which will be seen in its entirety only at the Museum of Modern Art, will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor – the first time that entire level has been devoted to the work of a living artist. The exhibition will encompass the wide range of diverse mediums that Piper has explored for over 50 years: drawing, photography, works on paper, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sculpture, and sound. The exhibition will be Piper’s first American museum exhibition in over 10 years, and her first since receiving the Golden Lion Award for Best Artist in the 56th Venice Biennale of 2015 and Germany’s Käthe Kollwitz Prize for 2018.
“It has been a privilege for us all to work with Piper in mounting this uncompromising exhibition, which will vastly expand our understanding of the Conceptual and post-Conceptual movements and Piper’s pivotal position among both her peers and later generations of artists,” said Glenn D. Lowry, The Museum of Modern Art’s Director. 
“I have been deeply honored and very moved by the curators’ invitation to do this exhibition,” added Piper. “It is a pleasure to collaborate with them on it. The Museum of Modern Art is offering me a unique and invaluable opportunity to make a much larger selection of work available to a much larger and more global audience than has ever been possible before. It is a terrific adventure.”
Adrian Piper has consistently produced groundbreaking, transformative work that has profoundly shaped the form and content of Conceptual art since the 1960s. Strongly inflected by her longstanding involvement with philosophy and yoga, her pioneering investigations into the political, social, psychological, and spiritual potential of Conceptual art have had an incalculable influence on artists working today.
The exhibition is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and David Platzker, former Curator, The Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; with Tessa Ferreyros, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Major support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund and Lannan Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Marilyn and Larry Fields, and by Marieluise Hessel Artzt.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.


Kazuo Miyagawa: Japan’s Greatest Cinematographer

April 12, 2018–April 29, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

The most influential cinematographer of postwar Japanese cinema, Kazuo Miyagawa (1908–1999) worked intimately with Yasujirô Ozu, Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, and Kon Ichikawa on some of their most important films. It was Miyagawa who, in his astonishing versatility, helped perfect Ozu’s exquisitely framed tatami-level compositions in Floating Weeds (1959); the long, choreographed tracking sequences of Mizoguchi’s Ugetsu (1953); the multiple perspectives and jump cuts of Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950) and Yojimbo (1961); and the innovative use of cameras from different vantage points in Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad (1965).

This first major US retrospective of Miyagawa’s work in more than 35 years opens with a rare screening of Hiroshi Inagaki’s 1943 version of The Rickshaw Man and the 4K restoration premiere of Ozu’s Floating Weeds (1959), a special event introduced by Miyagawa’s son Ichiro and Miyagawa’s camera assistant Masahiro Miyajima. A career-spanning survey of Miyagawa’s cinematography then continues both at MoMA and Japan Society throughout the month. Additionally, new 4K restorations of Kenji Mizoguchi’s A Story From Chikamatsu (1953) and Sansho the Bailiff (1954), both shot by Miyagawa, will run at Film Forum from April 6 through 12.

Miyagawa admired the stark, high-contrast lighting of German Expressionist films of the 1920s, and when he began his career at the Nikkatsu studio in the 1930s, he elevated routine melodramas and musicals through his own stylized black-and-white photography, most notably in Masahiro Makino’s Singing Lovebirds (1939), using mirrors outdoors to create dappled sunlight, for example, or a telephoto lens to suggest emotional distance. But it was his later experimentation with color for which he became legendary. Miyagawa explored the painterly, dramatic, and symbolic qualities of color in films as varied as Mizoguchi’s New Tales of the Taira Clan (1955), Kazuo Ikehiro’s Zatoichi and the Chest of Gold (1964), and Masahira Shinoda’s Silence (1971), based on the same Shûsaku Endô’s novel as the later Martin Scorsese adaptation, as well as Shinoda’s Ballad of Orin (1977) and Gonza the Spearman (1986).

Miyagawa is credited with having invented a color technology, the “bleach bypass,” on Ichikawa’s Her Brother (1960), a process by which he gained greater control over saturation and tonality. The effect is to cast a silvery sheen over the color image, a look that has been used in countless films since then, from cinematographer Roger Deakins’s work on Michael Radford’s 1984 to Janusz Kamínski’s work on Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan (1998). Another of Miyagawa’s masterful achievements was on Kon Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad (1965), where he supervised 164 cameramen, who used 234 different lenses to capture the dramatic intensity of competition in extreme close-up. The enduring influence of Miyagawa’s innovations and artistic sensibility is further reflected in rare 35mm screenings of Hiroshi Inagaki’s Children Hand in Hand (1948), Kozaburo Yoshimura’s Reminiscence (1953) and Bamboo Doll of Echizen (1963), and Yasuzo Masumura’s Irezumi (The Spider Tattoo) (1966).

Organized by Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art; and Aiko Masubuchi and Kazu Watanabe, film programmers at Japan Society.

Special thanks to The National Film Archive of Tokyo, The Japan Foundation, Kadokawa, and Janus Films for the loan of prints and digital restorations.

The exhibition is made possible by MUFG.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund.


Fernando Palma Rodríguez

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018

MoMA PS1 will present the first US solo museum exhibition of artist Fernando Palma Rodríguez (Mexican, b. 1957), on view from April 15 to September 3, 2018. Since the early 1990s, Palma Rodríguez has combined his training as an artist and mechanical engineer to create kinetic works that utilize complex robotics and custom software to perform complex, narrative choreographies. His works respond to issues facing indigenous communities in Mexico, addressing human and land rights, including the violent targeting of these communities, and urgent environmental crises. These concerns have particular significance to the district of Milpa Alta, an agricultural region outside of Mexico City where Palma Rodríguez lives and runs Calpulli Tecalco, a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of indigenous culture.

Fernando Palma Rodríguez is organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1.

Special thanks to Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Oaxaca.


Julia Phillips: Failure Detection

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018


MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York–based artist Julia Phillips (b. 1985, German), featuring newly commissioned major works in combination with existing sculptures. Primarily working with ceramics, Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures mostly avoid direct figuration, however, and instead propose various interventions into and support structures for the body, emphasizing its absence from the works. Impressions of the human form are visible through elements like casts of orifices, handprints, and other traces, which indicate particular bodily placements in relation to her forms. While suggestive of functions that are overtly physical, these works also extend to the social and psychological. For Phillips, the body is entangled in the real and abstract spaces of politics, evident through indications given in her arrangements as well as the works’ titles, which are often directives for specific actions.

Julia Phillips (b. 1985, Hamburg, Germany) lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg. Phillips will also be included in the forthcoming New Museum Triennial.

Organized by Ruba Katrib, Curator, MoMA PS1.


Projects 108: Gauri Gill

April 15, 2018–September 03, 2018


MoMA PS1 presents the US premiere of photographer Gauri Gill’s most recent body of work, Acts of Appearance, a series of vivid color photographs for which the artist worked closely with members of an Adivasi community in Jawhar district, Maharashtra, India. Renowned for their papier-mâché objects, including traditional sacred masks, Gill’s collaborator-subjects wear masks made to represent living individuals as they engage in everyday village activities. A confluence of scenarios and narratives, situated across “reality” and dreamlike states, come together in the photographs, which at once portray the familiar experiences of community members as well as symbolic or playful representations against the backdrop of their home and culture. Acts of Appearance is presented alongside a selection of Gill’s older photographs from the series Notes from the Desert, reflecting upon the echoes between works made over several years in different locations across India, and emphasizing her sustained engagement with rural communities and local artists.

Trained as a painter and applied artist, Gill (b. 1970, Chandigarh, India) received a BFA from the Delhi College of Art, and then turned to photography as her primary medium, earning a second BFA from Parsons School of Design in New York and an MFA from Stanford University. In 2011, Gill received the Grange Prize (now known as the Aimia/AGO Photography prize). Her work has been presented internationally, including at documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, the 7th Moscow Biennale, and Prospect 4 in New Orleans, as well as at institutions including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Yale University Art Gallery; the Art Gallery of Ontario; and the Whitechapel Gallery, London; among others. She lives in New Delhi.

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

MoMA Presents: Tamer El Said’s In the Last Days of the City

April 27, 2018–May 03, 2018

The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters

This film within a film is a haunting yet lyric chronicle of recent years in the Arab world, where revolutions seemed to spark hope for change and yield further instability in one stroke. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Khalid Abdalla (The Kite RunnerThe Square) plays the protagonist of Tamer El Said’s ambitious feature debut, a filmmaker in Cairo attempting to capture the zeitgeist of his city as the world changes around him—from personal love and loss to the fall of the Mubarak regime. Throughout, friends send footage and stories from Berlin, Baghdad, and Beirut, creating a powerful, multilayered meditation on togetherness, the tactile hold of cities, and the meaning of homeland. Shot in 2008 and completed this year, the film explores the weight of the cinematic image as record and storytelling in an ongoing time of change.

Organized by Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator, Department of Film.

Akher Ayam El Madina (In the Last Days of the City). 2016. Egypt/Germany/Great Britain/United Arab Emirates. Directed by Tamer El Said. In Arabic; English subtitles. 118 min.

Friday, April 27, 7:00 p.m. Discussion with the filmmaker, Theater 2
Saturday, April 28, 7:00 p.m., Theater 1
Sunday, April 29, 4:00 p.m., Theater 1
Monday, April 30, 4:00 p.m., Theater 2
Tuesday, May 1, 4:30 p.m., Theater 2
Wednesday, May 2, 7:00 p.m., Theater 2
Thursday, May 3, 4:30 p.m., Theater 2


Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund

April 29, 2018–July 22, 2018

Floor Two, Collection Galleries

A studio visit provides an opportunity for some of the most meaningful encounters, conversations, and exchanges between artists, friends, curators, and collectors. Agnes Gund—or “Aggie,” as she is affectionately known—is one of the most dedicated and steadfast of studio visitors, consistently inspired by the thrill of looking and talking with artists in the presence of their artworks. This exhibition celebrates Gund’s contributions as art patron, collector, and longtime Trustee of The Museum of Modern Art. The presentation pays tribute to the more than 700 works of art she has funded over the past half century. These gifts have come steadily and reliably during her decades of service as a key member of several departmental acquisition committees and her tenure as the Museum’s President from 1991 to 2002.

Gund is committed to supporting a vast range of artists, from celebrated figures she counts among her close friends to emerging talents whose work she champions. “My friendships with artists,” she has said, “as well as a sensitivity to the challenges facing women artists and artists of color, have been formative in shaping my collection, which is deeply personal and deeply autobiographical.” The exhibition will reflect the depth of her collecting by bringing together a broad-ranging group of artworks from the 1950s to today in a non-chronological display that sets visitor favorites, seldom seen works, and recent acquisitions in dialogue with one another. While presenting only a small fraction of the works Gund has given to MoMA, the presentation aims to prove that our collection would not be what it is today without her deeply held convictions and unparalleled generosity.

Organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture.


Bodys Isek Kingelez

May 26, 2018–October 21, 2018

Floor Three, The Philip Johnson Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, May 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

MoMA presents a full retrospective of Bodys Isek Kingelez (1948–2015), the Congolese sculptor who worked with paper, commercial packaging, and materials from everyday life to create what he called “extreme maquettes” that encompass civic buildings, public monuments, and private pavilions. Bodys Isek Kingelez will span Kingelez’s career overthree decades, ranging from early works that were included in the landmark 1989 exhibition Magiciens de la terre at the Centre Pompidou, to his streamlined, dramatic forms of the 2000s. The first retrospective of Kingelez’s work and the first substantial monographic presentation of his work in the US, this exhibition will feature works from each of the key periods of his career, from early single-building sculptures, to spectacular sprawling cities, to futuristic late works, which incorporate increasingly unorthodox materials. Kingelez was previously featured in the MoMA exhibition Projects 59: Architecture as Metaphor (1997). Although his work has long been featured in major international exhibitions, this will be the first opportunity in New York to explore the full breadth of his career.

Accompanied by a scholarly catalogue with texts by Suzuki, architect David Adjaye, and art historian Chika Okeke-Agulu, among others, the exhibition will unfold as a chronological display with a thematic approach, bringing together a group of his earliest, never-before-seen sculptures, works made during the artist’s first trip to Paris in 1989, civic structures, public monuments, and fantastic takes on geographically-specific architectural tropes. The installation will capture his transition from single buildings to entire metropolises, culminating in a selection of Kingelez’s large-scale cities marked by soaring forms that characterize much of his late production. The exhibition will bring together rarely seen works from both public and private collections, including The Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection), Geneva; The Museum of Everything, London; and the Groninger Museum, Groningen, Netherlands.

Organized by Sarah Suzuki, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

Exhibition design produced in collaboration with the artist Carsten Höller (German, born 1961).

Allianz is a partner of contemporary art at MoMA.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.


Reza Abdoh

June 03, 2018–September 03, 2018


Though he was only 32 at the time of his passing, the Iranian-American theater director Reza Abdoh’s (1963–95) mark on the world of theater was unmistakable. Relentlessly inventive, he pushed his actors—and audiences—to their limits amid ambitious, unusual, disorienting stage sets. Abdoh’s aesthetic language borrowed from fairy tales, BDSM, talk shows, raves, video art, and the history of avant-garde theater. The exhibition, the first large-scale retrospective of Abdoh’s work, will highlight the diverse video works that Abdoh produced for his performances and an installation based on his 1991 production Bogeyman. The exhibition also includes contextual materials reflecting the club scenes in both Los Angeles and New York, the culture wars of the Reagan era, and the AIDS crisis. Abdoh died of AIDS in 1995.  

Co-organized by Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art; and Negar Azimi, Tiffany Malakooti, and Babak Radboy for Bidoun. The exhibition is co-produced with the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin, where it will be presented from February 2 to April 29, 2019 and organized in collaboration with Krist Gruijthuijsen, Director.

MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art

June 08, 2018–October 07, 2018

The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

In partnership with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne will present MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art as part of its Winter Masterpieces series. MoMA at NGV will provide a unique survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s iconic collection. Consisting of approximately 200 key works, arranged chronologically into eight thematic sections, the exhibition will trace the development of art and design from late-19th-century urban and industrial transformation, through to the digital and global present.

The emergence of a “new art” at the turn of the 20th century will be represented by some of MoMA’s earliest acquisitions, including masterworks by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne as well as an architectural model by Le Corbusier featured in MoMA’s first architecture exhibition in 1932. Works by pioneering Cubist and Futurist artists, including Pablo Picasso and Umberto Boccioni, will appear alongside the radically abstracted forms present in graphic design, furniture, and textiles from the Bauhaus and in works by artists such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian. The surreal visual language of paintings by artists like Salvador Dalí and Frida Kahlo and the spontaneity and tactility advanced in works by prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Alexander Calder and Jackson Pollock will also be included.

Developments in art from the 1960s to the 1980s, from Minimalism through Postmodernism, will be explored through the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Lynda Benglis, Sol LeWitt, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Keith Haring, among others. Significant works of late 20th-century and early 21st century art and design, including major pieces by Kara Walker, Rineke Dijkstra, Andreas Gursky, Olafur Eliasson, Huang Yong Ping, Mona Hatoum, El Anatsui and Camille Henrot, will foreground ideas around cultural and national identity, and mobility in a globalized world. Tomohiro Nishikado’s pioneering computer game Space Invaders and Shigetaka Kurita’s original set of 176 emoji will further complement the discussion of contemporary topics.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria.

Organized by Samantha Friedman, Associate Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; Juliet Kinchin, Curator of Modern Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art; and Miranda Wallace, Senior Curator, International Exhibition Projects, NGV.


Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980

July 15, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Robert Menschel Galleries

Press Preview: Tuesday, July 10, 9:30-11:30 a.m., with remarks to follow.

Remarks will be livestreamed.

The Museum of Modern Art will explore the architecture of the former Yugoslavia with Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, the first major US exhibition to study the remarkable body of work that sparked international interest during the 45 years of the country’s existence. The exhibition will include more than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region, introducing the exceptional built work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience for the first time.

The architecture that emerged during this period—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist “social condensers”—is a manifestation of the radical pluralism, hybridity, and idealism that characterized the Yugoslav state itself. Exploring themes of large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture, Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature work by important architects, including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić. From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition will examine the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character.

Organized by Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and Vladimir Kulić, guest curator, with Anna Kats, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.


Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done

September 16, 2018–February 03, 2019

Floor Two, Contemporary Galleries and the Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium

For a brief period in the early 1960s, a group of choreographers, visual artists, composers, and filmmakers made use of a local church to present performances that Village Voice critic Jill Johnston declared the most exciting new developments in dance in a generation. Redefining the kinds of movement that could count as dance, the Judson participants—Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Philip Corner, Bill Dixon, Judith Dunn, David Gordon, Alex Hay, Deborah Hay, Fred Herko, Robert Morris, Steve Paxton, Rudy Perez, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Rauschenberg, Carolee Schneemann, and Elaine Summers, among others—would go on to profoundly shape all fields of art in the second half of the 20th century. Taking its name from the Judson Memorial Church, a socially engaged Protestant congregation in New York’s Greenwich Village, Judson Dance Theater was organized as a series of open workshops from which its participants developed performances. Together, the artists challenged traditional understandings of choreography, expanding dance in ways that reconsidered its place in the world. They employed new compositional methods to strip dance of its theatrical conventions, incorporating “ordinary” movements—gestures typical of the street or home, for example, rather than a stage—into their work, along with games, simple tasks, and social dances to infuse their pieces with a sense of spontaneity.

Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done highlights the ongoing significance of the history of Judson Dance Theater, beginning with the workshops and classes led by Anna Halprin, Robert Ellis Dunn, and James Waring and exploring the influence of other figures working downtown such as Simone Forti and Andy Warhol, as well as venues for collective action like Judson Gallery and the Living Theatre. Through live performance and some 300 objects including film, photographic documentation, sculptural objects, scores, music, poetry, architectural drawings, and archival material, the exhibition celebrates the group’s multidisciplinary and collaborative ethos as well as the range of its participants. The Work Is Never Done includes a gallery exhibition, a print publication, and an ambitious performance program in the Museum’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium.

The exhibition is organized by Ana Janevski, Curator, and Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, with Martha Joseph, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

Leadership support is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Major support for the exhibition and publication is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.



Charles White: A Retrospective

October 07, 2018–January 13, 2019

Floor Three, The Edward Steichen Galleries

With Charles White: A Retrospective, The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago present the first major museum exhibition of Charles White’s oeuvre in over 30 years, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from October 7, 2018, through January 13, 2019. Covering the full breadth of his career with over 100 multidisciplinary works, the exhibition features drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, and contextual ephemera. Prior to its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will be on view at the Art Institute of Chicago from June 8 through September 3, 2018. Following its MoMA presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), where it will be on view in Spring 2019.

Beginning in the late 1930s and concluding with White’s premature death in 1979, the exhibition features a detailed overview of his work over a four-decade span of enormous change in the US that provided a constant wellspring of subject matter for the artist. The presentation reveals White as a responsive visual strategist who was open to exploring styles and techniques inspired by contemporary art and culture, and a savvy interpreter of an evolving political climate. White’s commitment to figuration, to directly addressing the social and political concerns of his time, and to mastering mediums that allowed for wide circulation of his art established him as a major figure, and one with significant influence on his peers and followers.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with groupings centered on the cities and creative communities in which White lived and worked. Each section will be supported by relevant ephemera and supporting materials detailing White’s working process, political and social activities, and role as a teacher.

Charles White: A Retrospective is organized by Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Sarah Kelly Oehler, Field-McCormick Chair and Curator of American Art, Art Institute of Chicago.

Charles White: A Retrospective is part of Art Design Chicago, an exploration of Chicago’s art and design legacy, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art with presenting partner The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation.

The exhibition is supported at The Museum of Modern Art and Art Institute of Chicago by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

The Terra Foundation for American Art is dedicated to fostering exploration, understanding, and enjoyment of the visual arts of the United States for national and international audiences. Recognizing the importance of experiencing original works of art, the foundation provides opportunities for interaction and study, beginning with the presentation and growth of its own art collection in Chicago. To further cross-cultural dialogue on American art, the foundation supports and collaborates on innovative exhibitions, research, and educational programs. Implicit in such activities is the belief that art has the potential both to distinguish cultures and to unite them.


Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts

October 21, 2018–March 17, 2019

The Museum of Modern Art, The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, sixth floor, and MoMA PS1

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 will collaborate on the first comprehensive retrospective in 25 years devoted to the work of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941). Co-organized by The Museum of Modern Art and Schaulager Basel, Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts will draw upon the rich holdings of both institutions and over 70 lenders. Encompassing Nauman’s entire career, the exhibition will occupy the Museum’s entire sixth floor and the whole of MoMA PS1. This joint presentation will provide an opportunity to experience Nauman’s command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and neon to performance, video, film, sculpture, and architecturally scaled environments. The exhibition’s title refers to the manifold appearances of disappearance in the artist’s work. For Nauman, disappearance is both a real phenomenon and an ample metaphor for grappling with the anxieties of both the creative process and of navigating the everyday world.

Since 1970, Nauman has frequently worked on a monumental scale, necessitating this expansive presentation across both of MoMA’s locations. Both venues include works in all mediums and from all phases of Nauman’s career, offering distinct but complementary perspectives on his wide-ranging practice. The characteristics of the two spaces have shaped the curatorial approach to each: the flexibility of The Museum of Modern Art’s sixth-floor exhibition galleries will accommodate six of the artist’s largest works, alongside a representative selection of his production across the decades; while the suite of former classrooms in MoMA PS1’s historic building will house over 120 works in a more traditional retrospective format. At The Museum of Modern Art, the exhibition moves swiftly from Nauman’s early work examining his own body to works that directly involve the viewer, who must navigate a series of room-sized installations that dictate movement and stress the senses. At MoMA PS1, Disappearing Acts will unfold chronologically, but with strategic interruptions to highlight consistencies in a seemingly disparate body of work, as Nauman revisits earlier motifs and concerns with new urgency.

Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

The exhibition is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Laurenz Foundation Curator and Advisor to the Director, with Heidi Naef, Senior Curator, Schaulager, Basel, and Isabel Friedli, Curator, Schaulager, Basel, Magnus Schaefer, Assistant Curator, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

The exhibition is made possible by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

Major support is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions.

Generous funding is provided by Sully Bonnelly and Robert R. Littman and by Ellen and William Taubman.

Additional support is provided by The Museum of Modern Art’s Annual Exhibition Fund and the MoMA PS1 Annual Exhibition Fund.